Bob Hope

Biography: Legendary entertainer Bob Hope was born in Eltham, London, England the fifth of seven sons. His father William Henry Hope was a stonemason and his mother Avis Townes a singer. Emmigrating to the United States on March 30, 1908 aboard the SS Philadelphia the family settled in Cleveland, Ohio. As a youth Bob sold two-cent newspapers on the streets of Cleveland to supplement his family's income. On one occasion a gentleman in a limousine waited while Hope, who didn't have change for a dime, rushed into a nearby store to get change. When he returned he received a lecture about the importance of keeping change in order to take advantage of all business opportunities. The man was oil magnate John D. Rockefeller, founder of Standard Oil Company.

Bob and his gift for mimic entered many dancing and amateur contests, winning an award for his Charlie Chaplin impersonation. He briefly boxed under the name Packy East. It was silent film comedian Fatty Arbuckle who saw his performance and
Legendary entertainer Bob Hope was born in Eltham, London, England the fifth of seven sons. His father William Henry Hope was a stonemason and his mother Avis Townes a singer. Emmigrating to the United States on March 30, 1908 aboard the SS Philadelphia the family settled in Cleveland, Ohio. As a youth Bob sold two-cent newspapers on the streets of Cleveland to supplement his family's income. On one occasion a gentleman in a limousine waited while Hope, who didn't have change for a dime, rushed into a nearby store to get change. When he returned he received a lecture about the importance of keeping change in order to take advantage of all business opportunities. The man was oil magnate John D. Rockefeller, founder of Standard Oil Company.

Bob and his gift for mimic entered many dancing and amateur contests, winning an award for his Charlie Chaplin impersonation. He briefly boxed under the name Packy East. It was silent film comedian Fatty Arbuckle who saw his performance and got Bob steady work with the Hurley Jolly Follies. Bob spent five years on the vaudeville circuit and received bit parts in the films "The Sidewalks of New York" (1927) and "Smiles" (1928). Returning to New York he appeared in several musicals.

Bob appeared in a number of short comedies during the 30's and was finally signed by Paramount for the 1938 film "The Big Broadcast of 1938". It was in this picture that his signature song was performed by him, "Thanks For the Memory". Bob was a hit and he continued to work for Paramount until the 1950's.

Bob Hope's first regular radio series for NBC was the Woodbury Soap Hour, a year later Bob starred in The Pepsodent Radio Show starring Bob Hope it continued until 1953. Very busy Bob Hope was doing radio, film and television as well as his USO Tours overseas. After The Bob Hope Show began on NBC and lasted an outstanding 35 years. Ever the humanitarian, Bob loved to golf and was a huge supporter of sports. In 1960, the Bob Hope Desert Classic was founded sponsored by Chrysler.

In 2000, Bob's health was declining, his struggles with pneumonia and gastrointestinal problems plagued him and on July 27, 2003, Bob Hope died at his home in Toluca Lake. His legend will always live on. Thanks for the Memory!
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Bob Hope's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average career score: 74
Highest Metascore: 74 The Muppet Movie
Lowest Metascore: 74 The Muppet Movie
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
1 movie review
Title: Year: Credit: User score:
74 The Muppet Movie Jun 22, 1979 Ice Cream Vendor 8.5