Judd Winick

Biography: Judd Winick is an American comic book and comic strip writer/artist famous for his stint on MTV's The Real World: San Francisco, as well for his work on such comic books as Green Lantern, Green Arrow, and Pedro and Me, his autobiographical graphic novel about his friendship with Real World castmate and AIDS educator Pedro Zamora. In 2001, Winick married his Real World co-star Pam Ling. They had been living as a couple since 1994, and had a baby in May of 2005.

Winick and his older brother, Orin, were raised in a middle-class family by liberal, “atypical parents” (his father, an insurance broker, and his mother, a homemaker) that Winick felt placed their sons’ happiness above their own. Despite this, Winick was unhappy as a young child, mostly because he found school boring and difficult. He found solace in drawing, a pastime he enjoyed for as long as he could remember, because it set him apart and made him noticed. He continued his artistic interests throughout his school
Judd Winick is an American comic book and comic strip writer/artist famous for his stint on MTV's The Real World: San Francisco, as well for his work on such comic books as Green Lantern, Green Arrow, and Pedro and Me, his autobiographical graphic novel about his friendship with Real World castmate and AIDS educator Pedro Zamora. In 2001, Winick married his Real World co-star Pam Ling. They had been living as a couple since 1994, and had a baby in May of 2005.

Winick and his older brother, Orin, were raised in a middle-class family by liberal, “atypical parents” (his father, an insurance broker, and his mother, a homemaker) that Winick felt placed their sons’ happiness above their own. Despite this, Winick was unhappy as a young child, mostly because he found school boring and difficult. He found solace in drawing, a pastime he enjoyed for as long as he could remember, because it set him apart and made him noticed. He continued his artistic interests throughout his school years, drawing, painting, and acting in school plays. He also maintained good grades and participated in soccer, track, and the student council. Winick began cartooning professionally at 16 when his single-panel strip, Nuts and Bolts, was picked up by Anton Publications, a newspaper publisher that produced town papers in the Tri-state area. The strip ran weekly, and Winick was paid $10 a week.

A seminal event that helped shape Winick’s liberal social views occurred during his third year of high school when a liberal social studies teacher that Winick admired, Lou Marrett, announced, by writing on the blackboard, the message, “I AM GAY The students were surprised and confused, having thought that Marrett was happily married, but Marrett explained that his wife was a beard, or a cover for his homosexuality.

Marrett made this announcement because he wanted to provoke his students into thinking about and asking challenging questions about its implications, such as whether the boys in the class were worried about him making a pass, whether the girls were similarly nervous before he made his “announcement,” whether they thought he should be allowed to teach, etc. Marrett revealed at the end of the class that he wasn’t really gay and that he only made this announcement as a thought experiment, which Winick says got him thinking about confronting important questions from different points of view.

Winick graduated from high school in 1988 and entered the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor’s School of Art, intending to emulate his cartoonist heroes Garry Trudeau and Berke Breathed. His comic strip, Nuts and Bolts, began running in the school’s newspaper, the Michigan Daily, in his freshman year, and he was selected to speak at graduation. UM also published a small print-run of a collection of his strips called Watching the Spin-Cycle: The Nuts and Bolts Collection. In his senior year, Universal Press Syndicate, which syndicates strips such as Cathy, Doonesbury, The Far Side, and Calvin and Hobbes, offered Winick a development contract, and by the summer of 1992, his success seemed assured.

In early 1993 Winick lived in a tiny apartment in Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts, with his roommate, fellow writer Brad Meltzer, struggling to develop Nuts and Bolts for UPS while working at a bookstore, but in early June that year, UPS decided not to renew Winick’s strip for syndication, feeling it could not compete in the current market. Unable to convince other syndicates to pick up the strip, Winick, dejected, was forced to move back in with his parents in July, doing unfulfilling T-shirt work for beer companies. Judd also had Nuts and Bolts in development with the children’s television network Nickelodeon as an animated series, even turning turned the human characters into mice, and proposing new titles like Young Urban Mice and Rat Race, but nothing came of it.
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Judd Winick's Scores

  • TV
Average career score: 65
Highest Metascore: 70 The Real World: Season 3
Lowest Metascore: 60 The Awesomes: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 2
  2. Negative: 0 out of 2
2 tv reviews
Title: Year: Credit: User score:
tbd The Awesomes: Season 2 Aug 4, 2014 Writer / Producer tbd
60 The Awesomes: Season 1 Aug 1, 2013 Writer 6.7
tbd The Life and Times of Juniper Lee: Season 3 Aug 16, 2006 Creator tbd
tbd The Life and Times of Juniper Lee: Season 1 May 30, 2005 Writer tbd
70 The Real World: Season 3 Jun 23, 1994 Season 3 - San Francisco tbd