Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,896 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 I'm Not There.
Lowest review score: 0 Gigli
Score distribution:
6896 movie reviews
  1. John Lewis: Good Trouble isn’t a great film, but it has a great subject — and excellent timing.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Force of Nature lives up, down, and sideways to all those demands; it’s hardly a great film, but it keeps you watching, and only partly in disbelief.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Hamilton stands as a reminder of how hard it is to get a democracy right, and how necessary it is to keep trying, as long as it takes.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Irresistible is a movie of the moment. Unfortunately, that moment is 2015.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A bad dopey Will Ferrell comedy – overlong, underwritten, as strained as its title, and running on schtick and storylines that are practically rims.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The gap between storytelling and story is rarely as wide as in The Last Tree, a coming-of-age drama that is rapturously shot and dramatically trite.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Miss Juneteenth is a simple story but a resonant one: modest but impactful, focused on one woman’s pride and her daughter’s future while unfolding in the bedrock of a known and loved environment. You can feel the history coming up through its pores.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The thrill of watching an Olivier Assayas movie is that you often have no idea where it’s going next. This time out, it seems, neither does he.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Under Murphy’s direction, the tone is darkly comic — not what you’d expect given that plot synopsis but to which the actors respond with deftness and creativity, like downhill skiers facing a challenging slalom.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The laughs in The King of Staten Island are earned, and they are frequent — a frequency that is no small accomplishment, given the pain and loss at the film’s center.
  2. One wonders if a director more playful than Kenneth Branagh might have come up with something less hectic and more fun — or even just as hectic and more fun. Taika Waititi, anyone? Jojo Rabbit is almost as odd a name as Artemis Fowl.
  3. This extremely dry film mixes humor and melancholy to distinctive, if muffled, effect. Take away the muffled part, and that’s very Nighy, too. In being winningly understated and sometimes maddeningly stylized, Sometimes Always Never is a bit like Alan.
  4. It’s a strange thing when a movie is at its most dynamic when it’s at its most didactic. But that’s the case with Da 5 Bloods. Lee is consciously juggling a lot of balls: not just fact and fiction, past and present, but also humor, action, family drama, and tragedy. The balls don’t stay in the air. The movie has the bumpety-bump pacing of a mini-series forced into a single overlong episode.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    By contrast, the undercard of Shirley is the bruising, scintillating war of wills between Jackson and her husband. Stanley Hyman was by all accounts a larger-than-life figure, and Stuhlbarg plays him with the exuberance of a clown and the insecurity of a bully.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Largely plotless, confidently self-indulgent, and more leering toward those acting students than seems wise, Tommaso is worth a look for the Rome locations and the burnished widescreen cinematography of Peter Zeitlinger. Above all it’s a showcase for Dafoe, who continues a remarkable late-career run.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Greeson writes dialogue that’s shallow but clever; and under Nisha Ganatra’s direction, The High Note tells a brisk, improbable tale.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Yet not only does this bares-bones “Close Encounters” make a virtue out of found locations and empty night-time streets, it has the confidence of a story sure in its telling. It feels original.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A sweet, slight drama of midlife readjustment, I Will Make You Mine is the belated final film in a trilogy about a struggling indie rocker and the three women in his life. The first two movies are “Surrogate Valentine” (2011) and “Daylight Savings” (2012), and they haunt the new film like a phantom limb. Do you need to have seen them to take in I Will Make You Mine? Yes, but that’s OK.
  5. Everyone in the documentary agrees that the undertaking was truly terrible and misconceived. The extensive footage here does nothing to contradict such a view.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    She (Tsai Chin) and she alone makes the movie worth your time. Written by Angela Cheng and Sasie Sealy and directed by Sealy, Lucky Grandma is a low-budget labor of love that’s very funny until you realize it has no idea where it’s going.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s nothing in Military Wives you haven’t seen before, but these are times of comfort food, and this formulaic comedy-drama about a group of British army-base spouses who start a choir is so determined to be uplifting that your up may be lifted in spite of itself.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So compelling is The Painter and the Thief — and ultimately so powerfully moving in its faith in human resilience — that you may not notice the illuminating ways in which Ree plays with form and viewpoint. The documentary won a special jury award for creative storytelling at the most recent Sundance Film Festival and it comes to streaming video as one of the year’s most affecting and subtly radical movie experiences.
  6. What makes Steve and Rob so funny is that they’re so human: petty, insecure, rivalrous, as well as charming and hilarious. Nothing’s more human than sadness, not even laughter, and laughter The Trip to Greece has to offer in plenty. What’s their next destination? Wherever it is, the important thing is that there be one.
  7. If anything, the film does a bit too much, going for variety and breadth sometimes at the expense of depth. There are a lot of bases to touch here, and touching pretty much all of them means several get touched too lightly. Jazz trumpeter and New Orleans native Terence Blanchard serves as a passionate, highly informed guide.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The British actor works his gonzo Method madness with such rigorous control, though, that he’s mesmerizing to watch even when the movie around him is losing its mind.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A sludgy action thriller with an out-of-shape star, Blood and Money doesn’t have a lot going for it other than its setting: the uncharted north Maine woods in the dead of winter.
  8. So it’s no small tribute to Feldstein — who really is something — to say that she’s the very best thing in How to Build a Girl despite being so wildly miscast. Her performance is a tour de force, even if it’s too forceful for either its own good or that of the movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s worth a look, if only to get in on the ground floor of a comic mind who will hopefully continue to grow. And it’s worth a listen, if only for observations like “You know what’s ironic? Arguing about Alanis Morissette with your gay boyfriend.”
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Dennehy had completed two more films before dying, at 81, on April 15, but Driveways is coming out on streaming platforms closest to his passing and it is the one to raise a glass to and maybe shed a tear over.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is a grim, at times lurid tale with hard observations about growing up poor, Black, and male in America — about the cycles of defeat that can land multiple generations in prison — and many of the details have the sting of the rap songs that permeate the soundtrack. Elsewhere, however, All Day and a Night plays like an urban crime thriller made with more earnestness than style.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Bull is one of those quiet heartland indie dramas that can serve as a tonic after a steady diet of blockbuster. It’s about human connection, which is much on people’s minds in these days of global pandemic. And it’s about rodeo bull riders, a group of people I’ve always thought should have their heads examined.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This tale of a leather coat that wants to be God may not be the director’s finest work, but it’s certainly more than a fringe benefit.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The lead performers put it over, with Lewis very appealing as Ellie. She plays this small, fierce character as comfortable in her social invisibility yet increasingly exasperated by the insularity and ethnic slurs of her small town.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A meat-and-potatoes action movie that manages to extract the charisma from one of our most likable sides of beef.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    He (Kurzel) wants this “true history” to be a Rorschach blot of Australia’s national psychology, but he’s made something closer to splatter art instead.
  9. Even when events get intense, even violent, and they do, there’s nothing abrupt. Corpus Christi never erupts. It unfolds.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Abe
    A great measure of Abe’s success is that it made me hungry. More than that, it’s the first movie in quite some time to make me smile.
  10. Marcel Carne's Children of Paradise isn't just one of France's great love stories - it's one of film's. [23 Feb 1992, p.B35]
    • Boston Globe
  11. Balloon manages to combine slickness and sentimentality, predictability and implausibility. The fact that it’s based on a true story — the closing credits include photographs of the actual families — does not make up for the amassing of red herrings, close calls, and occasions for head-scratching.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watching Shea Whigham and Michael Shannon in The Quarry is like watching two highly qualified surgeons try to jolt a comatose patient back to life. They get the limbs twitching nicely, but the heart never turns over and starts running.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    That uncertainty is the strength of writer-director Tayarisha Poe’s debut feature and ultimately its undoing. There’s dramatic ambiguity and there’s a muddle, and you may spend the movie’s 97 minutes trying to untwine one from the other.
  12. Fatiguing for grown-ups, “TWT” may well scare, or at least unsettle, kids under 6. And kids much over 6 are likely to tire of the unrelenting cutesiness.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Love Wedding Repeat isn’t more than the sum of its fairly foolproof parts, and it suffers from a leading man who’s likable but who lacks the mad gleam of a true farceur. The rest of the cast pulls their weight.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s tempting to see Tigertail in the tradition of the Ingmar Bergman classic “Wild Strawberries,” with its emotionally constipated hero looking back over a lifetime of mistakes and missed connections. But the comparison only highlights Yang’s weaknesses as a first-time feature director: flat dialogue that mistakes subtext for text, glacially paced scenes that lack dramatic momentum, stolidly unimaginative camerawork, and a central character so unsympathetic that you end up siding with his ex-wife and daughter.
  13. Will print books ultimately disappear, replaced by digital versions? The ever-entertaining and insightful Fran Lebowitz offers anecdotal evidence to the contrary. She notes that on the subway she sees many people in their 20s reading actual books. So perhaps there is hope a new generation will revive the bound medium.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Much about the new film feels simultaneously playful and dangerous, with fanciful inventions like the whistling language taught to the hero by the gangsters so they can communicate out loud in secret.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Both leads are excellent; you expect as much from Vance but the surprise is the quietly charismatic Athie, who gives his role shades of geniality, ambition, frustration, and pig-headedness.
  14. The best thing about Akin’s film is the dance stuff. The movie begins with arresting black-and-white archival footage of Georgian dancing. The rehearsals in the dance studio come alive, thanks in no small part to the drum-and-accordion accompaniment. Kinetically, the style of dance is percussive and assertive. It doesn’t so much flow as boil.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Some of Loach’s movies have breathing room, but this isn’t one of them. That’s a feature, not a bug. Sorry We Missed You depicts the vise into which many people are forced to put head, hearts, and lives in order to pay the rent and feed their families. It dramatizes a daily sprint up an escalator that pulls workers backwards.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The performance of Flanagan, a first-time actress, is both harrowing and possessed of an eloquence that has no need for words. You come away from this movie weeping for the Autumns of this world but awed by their endurance.
  15. The experience of watching Crip Camp might inspire you to reexamine your attitudes about disabled people and how society treats them. Though occasionally sentimental and preachy, it is an essential reminder of a civil-rights struggle that many have forgotten and a cause that has yet to be fully achieved.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s a reason this movie was a critical and popular success in Brazil: It resonates. And despite the beauty of the weathered local faces this movie celebrates, it resonates for anyone, anywhere, watching it. “What do they call the inhabitants of Bacurau?” a young boy is asked. “People!” he responds. Just so.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film’s greatest strength is its lead actress, Haley Bennett, who’s on camera for almost the entire running time and who portrays a desperately lonely woman’s journey through self-destruction toward something like sanity.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie gets credit for showing the struggles he and millions of others with similar disorders live with on a daily basis. They’re not pretty, but — aside from Emma — they’re real.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    George Nolfi directs with a TV-movie straightforwardness and at two hours the film is overlong, but the story is an eye-opener and the central performances are terrific.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s pretty great — not quite “Fargo” with lobsters but close enough, and about as good as regional filmmaking gets. Filmed in Harpswell, Maine and environs — the cobwork of Bailey Island Bridge curves through one scene — Blow the Man Down delves cleverly and suspensefully beneath the surface of a small, well-appointed fishing town in winter. There are bodies and there is blood. There are also a lot of quietly furious women.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s of a piece with shaggy recent westerns like “The Sisters Brothers” and “Slow West,” and it owes a debt of gratitude as well to the work of Robert Altman, especially the classic “McCabe and Mrs. Miller.” (That First Cow marks the final appearance of Altman regular and “McCabe” costar Rene Auberjonois is a lovely poetic touch.)
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A clever, gory, often very funny piece of genre junk — a B+ movie — that carries a hidden warning: When we turn other people into cartoons of our worst fears, the only thing left to do is kill each other.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Way Back is the first real Sad Ben film. It’s earnest and old-fashioned and sturdily made, and I wish that were enough to make it good.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A scattershot satire about the vulgar, privileged one percent, British division, that’s almost as funny as it is furious.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Wendy feels like a holding maneuver — a way for a gifted young storyteller to keep one foot in the innocence of childhood while figuring what he’s really going to do next.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is almost wholly lacking in the Pixar touch — that extra oomph of wit, invention, creative craziness, darkness, depth of feeling, whatever, that makes the company’s products among the very few items manufactured for children in our sold-out popular culture to not feel like products.
  16. Robertson’s ex-wife, Dominique. Her thoughtful presence is a very welcome departure from the standard rock-doc formula. She provides the kind of reality check — an under-the-influence Manuel almost got her killed when he totaled her Mustang, with her in the passenger seat — rarely found in such films. In that sense, it isn’t just the Band that was different but “Once Were Brothers” is, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s still a clever-clever cartoon version of the book, with broad physical business in place of wit and Austen’s insights on gender roles and social hypocrisy tossed overboard. But I guess if the Empire waists are high enough and the male leads strappingly repressed, nothing else really matters.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is floating into a fierce war of wills between Iya and Masha, one in which their locked stares gradually seem to become an eerie, eternal bond of sisterhood. They can’t look away. Neither may you.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a sly, twisty little chiller, not ashamed of its B-movie bona fides and better for it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Leave it to James to sum up a legendary, culture-altering talent: “She turned her lack of self-awareness into a triumph.” Both sides of that coin live on in our modern culture, and Kael’s voice fills every self-satisfied corner of the Internet. Two decades after her death, she’s still the ghost in the machine.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Cancer dramas are not uncommon; what lifts Ordinary Love just enough out of the ordinary is its concern with how a married couple survives the ordeal. Intimate, unsparing, and attuned to the micro-nuances of a longtime relationship, it is made special by the two actors at its center, both out-size talents who here relish the opportunity to play close and draw from life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Traitor is a coolly epic appraisal of a country’s struggle with its dark side rather than a mobbed-up melodrama. If it’s “Godfather” clichés you want, there’s always “The Godfather.”
  17. The documentary loses a bit when Dagg returns home, and an alarmingly perky score doesn’t help. Late in life, after her tenure struggles, she published a new edition of her dissertation and found herself rediscovered.
  18. When the best thing about a movie is the title, that’s never a good sign. It’s all downhill from there? Exactly, and that’s the case with Downhill.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Céline Sciamma’s extraordinary fourth feature and a movie of body, heart, and mind.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Assistant is a stealth bomb of a movie: It barely makes a noise but it leaves a crater in your heart.
  19. The title might trumpet Harley Quinn’s emancipation, but she again feels like a character trapped in a movie that’s mediocre at best.
  20. It’s a diverting if slightly undercooked throwback that could offer more genuine intrigue, but that’s still worth it to see the cast gamely chuck out the window manners and vanity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Clemency observes its characters with a steady, unmodulated pace and a minimum of frills.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s rough and observant, stacked with finely etched characters whose sympathies keep shifting along with ours.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    And while I understand Downey wanting to make a movie for his kids, the world might be better served if, at long last, he made one for himself.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An acceptable creature feature at best and a waterlogged “Alien” at worst, Underwater sneaks into town as a true January release: a shelf-sitting production that 20th Century Fox’s new owner, Disney, is putting outside the store like a loaf of stale bread. It’s there if you want it, and you could chew on worse.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As true-story dramas about innocent men on death row go, Just Mercy is just above average. I still hope it reaches the widest audience possible. To quote a statistic cited in the film, for every nine prisoners executed in this country, one is found to have been wrongfully convicted. That’s a number to shame a nation.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s the lack of depth that ultimately may keep you from committing to 1917 or even respecting it — the movie’s sense that war is simply something that happens to people rather than being caused by them. Don’t forget that World War I was once called The War to End All Wars. It wasn’t and according to the headlines it still isn’t, but this movie never stops running to bother ask why.
  21. “[Dance] gives you nothing back,” says Cage. “No manuscripts to store away, no paintings to show on walls and maybe hang in museums, no poems to be printed and sold, nothing but that single fleeting moment when you feel alive.” Kovgan’s film comes close to capturing that moment.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In Fabric is good bizarre fun, but after a while that’s all it is.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The achievement of this wonderful movie goes beyond the specifics of its production. Gerwig has reimagined the novel back to its roots, as the story of not just one woman but all the women Louisa May Alcott may have lived with or known or been. It is an offering — to her, to them, and to us.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Because Howard never stops moving, neither does the movie, and the effect is both exhausting and electrifying. Watching this latest bulletin from the Safdie brothers, Benny and Josh, is like grabbing hold of a high-voltage line: It doesn’t feel that great, but good luck letting go.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 12 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I truly believe our divided nation can be healed and brought together as one by Cats — the musical, the movie, the disaster. In other news, my eyes are burning. Oh God, my eyes.
  22. If there’s any way that Roach slips back into a creative pigeonhole, it’s by being overly keen on sticking his actors in prosthetic makeup. Richard Kind’s Rudy Giuliani, for one, elicits an unintended chuckle. And while Theron’s makeover is, again, uncanny, Kidman’s cleft chin is needlessly distracting. We’d buy her performance without it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie takes its place alongside Martin Scorsese’s “Silence” (2016) as a work of true solemnity, one that wonders what we owe the divine in our worldly life. If the Scorsese film is arguably about the profoundest of doubts, A Hidden Life is something different. It’s an act of faith. Maybe Malick knows we’ll be needing it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Arriving with a blockbuster sound and fury that has been dialed up to 11, the movie is a dismayingly safe act of franchise closure. In terms of pure narrative, it’s satisfying. What it very rarely is is inspired.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Hauser, who’s excellent, uses his bulk and heavy-lidded eyes to keep the character a cipher; Eastwood knows we’re judging Jewell as much as the real cops who mock this naïve wannabe behind his back.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    These documentaries are a time-lapse study of human life. They are a gift.
  23. Both Pryce and Hopkins are fine. But on the basis of the rest of the movie they shouldn’t have a prayer.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Atlantics is a stunner that sneaks up on you: A folk tale, a police procedural, a ghost story, a love story, a fable of empowerment — Mati Diop’s directorial debut never stops evolving in new directions and meanings. It’s a work of magical realism close to Gabriel Garcia Marquez and other masters of the game, and the confidence with which it has been made is thrilling.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The best audiences for this thrilling confabulation may be younger ones: They’ll feel their minds expand with inspiration and be less inclined to deflate back to earth afterward. Somebody did something amazing back in 1862; The Aeronauts commemorates it with artifice, enthusiasm, and a smattering of the truth.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s not her greatest work but it’s warm, witty, and thorough. It’s a little like visiting a beloved old aunt who you suddenly remember has more smarts and creativity — more balls — than anyone else you know.
  24. Wolf relies on the videos far too much. That over-reliance makes Recorder feel padded, as does his frequent use of reenactments.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a tale as old as time and a story ripped from the news feed; a dream of connection and an anvil to the heart. See it for the arrivals of a directorial talent and a stunning young actress, and see it to remind yourself of this country’s ancient and eternal sins.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Pound for pound, actor for actor, laugh for laugh, Knives Out may be the most entertaining movie of the year.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If they called it “Divorce Story,” you wouldn’t go see it. And you really should. Not only is Marriage Story possibly the magnum opus Noah Baumbach has been working toward for much of his career; not only does it give space to two or three or five of our finest working actors to re-enact the human condition as a daily tragicomedy; not only is it a “Kramer vs. Kramer” that refuses to take sides.
  25. Middling cop thriller, whose attention-grabbing city-on-lockdown premise is undercut by thin plotting and forced performances from the supporting cast.

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