Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,896 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Poetry
Lowest review score: 0 Porky's
Score distribution:
6896 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Bull is one of those quiet heartland indie dramas that can serve as a tonic after a steady diet of blockbuster. It’s about human connection, which is much on people’s minds in these days of global pandemic. And it’s about rodeo bull riders, a group of people I’ve always thought should have their heads examined.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This tale of a leather coat that wants to be God may not be the director’s finest work, but it’s certainly more than a fringe benefit.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The lead performers put it over, with Lewis very appealing as Ellie. She plays this small, fierce character as comfortable in her social invisibility yet increasingly exasperated by the insularity and ethnic slurs of her small town.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A meat-and-potatoes action movie that manages to extract the charisma from one of our most likable sides of beef.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    He (Kurzel) wants this “true history” to be a Rorschach blot of Australia’s national psychology, but he’s made something closer to splatter art instead.
  1. Even when events get intense, even violent, and they do, there’s nothing abrupt. Corpus Christi never erupts. It unfolds.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Abe
    A great measure of Abe’s success is that it made me hungry. More than that, it’s the first movie in quite some time to make me smile.
  2. Marcel Carne's Children of Paradise isn't just one of France's great love stories - it's one of film's. [23 Feb 1992, p.B35]
    • Boston Globe
  3. Balloon manages to combine slickness and sentimentality, predictability and implausibility. The fact that it’s based on a true story — the closing credits include photographs of the actual families — does not make up for the amassing of red herrings, close calls, and occasions for head-scratching.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watching Shea Whigham and Michael Shannon in The Quarry is like watching two highly qualified surgeons try to jolt a comatose patient back to life. They get the limbs twitching nicely, but the heart never turns over and starts running.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    That uncertainty is the strength of writer-director Tayarisha Poe’s debut feature and ultimately its undoing. There’s dramatic ambiguity and there’s a muddle, and you may spend the movie’s 97 minutes trying to untwine one from the other.
  4. Fatiguing for grown-ups, “TWT” may well scare, or at least unsettle, kids under 6. And kids much over 6 are likely to tire of the unrelenting cutesiness.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Love Wedding Repeat isn’t more than the sum of its fairly foolproof parts, and it suffers from a leading man who’s likable but who lacks the mad gleam of a true farceur. The rest of the cast pulls their weight.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s tempting to see Tigertail in the tradition of the Ingmar Bergman classic “Wild Strawberries,” with its emotionally constipated hero looking back over a lifetime of mistakes and missed connections. But the comparison only highlights Yang’s weaknesses as a first-time feature director: flat dialogue that mistakes subtext for text, glacially paced scenes that lack dramatic momentum, stolidly unimaginative camerawork, and a central character so unsympathetic that you end up siding with his ex-wife and daughter.
  5. Will print books ultimately disappear, replaced by digital versions? The ever-entertaining and insightful Fran Lebowitz offers anecdotal evidence to the contrary. She notes that on the subway she sees many people in their 20s reading actual books. So perhaps there is hope a new generation will revive the bound medium.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Much about the new film feels simultaneously playful and dangerous, with fanciful inventions like the whistling language taught to the hero by the gangsters so they can communicate out loud in secret.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Both leads are excellent; you expect as much from Vance but the surprise is the quietly charismatic Athie, who gives his role shades of geniality, ambition, frustration, and pig-headedness.
  6. The best thing about Akin’s film is the dance stuff. The movie begins with arresting black-and-white archival footage of Georgian dancing. The rehearsals in the dance studio come alive, thanks in no small part to the drum-and-accordion accompaniment. Kinetically, the style of dance is percussive and assertive. It doesn’t so much flow as boil.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Some of Loach’s movies have breathing room, but this isn’t one of them. That’s a feature, not a bug. Sorry We Missed You depicts the vise into which many people are forced to put head, hearts, and lives in order to pay the rent and feed their families. It dramatizes a daily sprint up an escalator that pulls workers backwards.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The performance of Flanagan, a first-time actress, is both harrowing and possessed of an eloquence that has no need for words. You come away from this movie weeping for the Autumns of this world but awed by their endurance.
  7. The experience of watching Crip Camp might inspire you to reexamine your attitudes about disabled people and how society treats them. Though occasionally sentimental and preachy, it is an essential reminder of a civil-rights struggle that many have forgotten and a cause that has yet to be fully achieved.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s a reason this movie was a critical and popular success in Brazil: It resonates. And despite the beauty of the weathered local faces this movie celebrates, it resonates for anyone, anywhere, watching it. “What do they call the inhabitants of Bacurau?” a young boy is asked. “People!” he responds. Just so.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film’s greatest strength is its lead actress, Haley Bennett, who’s on camera for almost the entire running time and who portrays a desperately lonely woman’s journey through self-destruction toward something like sanity.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie gets credit for showing the struggles he and millions of others with similar disorders live with on a daily basis. They’re not pretty, but — aside from Emma — they’re real.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    George Nolfi directs with a TV-movie straightforwardness and at two hours the film is overlong, but the story is an eye-opener and the central performances are terrific.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s pretty great — not quite “Fargo” with lobsters but close enough, and about as good as regional filmmaking gets. Filmed in Harpswell, Maine and environs — the cobwork of Bailey Island Bridge curves through one scene — Blow the Man Down delves cleverly and suspensefully beneath the surface of a small, well-appointed fishing town in winter. There are bodies and there is blood. There are also a lot of quietly furious women.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s of a piece with shaggy recent westerns like “The Sisters Brothers” and “Slow West,” and it owes a debt of gratitude as well to the work of Robert Altman, especially the classic “McCabe and Mrs. Miller.” (That First Cow marks the final appearance of Altman regular and “McCabe” costar Rene Auberjonois is a lovely poetic touch.)
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A clever, gory, often very funny piece of genre junk — a B+ movie — that carries a hidden warning: When we turn other people into cartoons of our worst fears, the only thing left to do is kill each other.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Way Back is the first real Sad Ben film. It’s earnest and old-fashioned and sturdily made, and I wish that were enough to make it good.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A scattershot satire about the vulgar, privileged one percent, British division, that’s almost as funny as it is furious.

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