DarkStation's Scores

  • Games
For 3,654 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Resident Evil 3
Lowest review score: 10 Deer Hunter: Reloaded
Score distribution:
3657 game reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Gensou Skydrift has little going for it. There’s little to appreciate for fans of Touhou or racing games. The story doesn’t have much charm in it to justify getting it for the campaign and the character dialogue is forgettable gibberish. The racing is unappealing due to the often abysmal track design as well as the driving that feels clunky and simplistic. Gensou Skydrift is a title that’s only worth playing for the sheer novelty of playing a Touhou racing game where characters ride on top of each other.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    "Style over substance" is a reflexively-bandied phrase that's diminished in meaning over time. Although I partly agree to its usage here to highlight certain gameplay flaws, I don't think that should tarnish Narita Boy's immense successes. Studio Koba designed what they knew best – reverent 80s nostalgia, inspired techno-spirituality, beautiful 2D art, & more – with a sincerity rarely seen today.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While frustrating at times, Signs of the Sojourner does a fantastic job of nailing the actual flow of communication in the form of a card game. It also provides an excellent sense of freedom. By the time I got to one of the game’s multiple endings, I really felt like my actions and choices had earned it. I only wish that it had gone on a bit longer. Just when I really felt like I was getting everything the game was throwing at me, it ended. Still, I appreciate a game that leaves me wanting more and the different paths I could have taken provide enticement for a second trip.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If you go into this game expecting horror and mind-blowing puzzles, you’ll be disappointed. However, the storyline and the artwork justifies the purpose of the game, especially if you actually understand the story *cough* unlike me *cough*. If anything, I’ll at least be picking up a Lovecraft book from my local library so I can fake it better next time.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The writing has its fair share of material that’s worth a few sharp exhales through the nose and sensible chuckling but the committed delivery of the cast is a nice surprise and adds value. If you’re a fan of the Explosm! webcomic series and shorts, then Freakpocalypse is bound to hold a measure of interest. Just don’t go in expecting too much.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There are some things you expect coming into a Square Enix produced JRPG. You expect some grinding, you expect some weird dialogue, you even expect it to take a while to get going (I’m looking at you Final Fantasy XIII and the 30 hours it took to get good). What you don’t expect is for the game to feel like it’s just going through the motions with its story, for the central class system to not feel worthwhile, and for the battle system’s main claim to fame being you get to skip your turn to go later. Turns out Defaulting on this one is the right move.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The decision on this game comes down to the pros vs the cons, and whether you think you'd be happy to enjoy it as it is, or if you'd rather wait until some more updates. The load times and staggers can be mildly irritating and can amass during longer play sessions, but are by no means game-breaking or a reason entirely not to give it a go. Especially for those looking to play a little more casually, or in shorter bursts, or maybe aren't now accustomed to the world of SSD loading times, I still have to recommend this title as worth a go - just perhaps not necessarily the one to pick above the others.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Star Renegades is fine enough a game in its genre but it hangs too tightly onto its rigorous gameplay loop, exhausting fun out of repeated attempts.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Cathedral lacks vision where it counts. The title is focused on appealing to the hardcore with its retro presentation and difficulty that borders on irritating. The visuals and audio are certainly reminiscent of titles from the past, however, they lack that special polish that would elevate them beyond the superficial way they ape how games looked and sounded back then. Level design lacked care in checkpoint placement and enemy locations as well as quality of life features, which stacked tedium upon tedium. Overall, I have trouble recommending Cathedral; though it certainly has a niche appeal, its faults made the experience less than satisfactory.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    By blending social deduction with survival mechanics Other Ocean has successfully avoided any Among Us clone accusations. Regardless of my tempered enthusiasm from Day One DLC and some polish concerns, Project Winter is a well-devised game that can lead to moments of intense distrust and cooperation few online games can equal.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ghosts 'N Goblins Resurrection is a bona fide niche title that will only hold appeal to the masochistic. Even on its easiest setting, where dying leads to an instant respawn, I can’t have fun with a game that amounts to slamming your head against a rock wall. It might have been better for Capcom and Nintendo to make the original games available through the Nintendo Online service because Resurrection is an experience modified to make it somewhat more digestible to a new audience. Choosing different difficulties is a nice touch but after beating the game on Page, which was insane even with no-cost respawning, what incentive did I have to go back and do it all again while adding even more painful roadblocks? Yeah, no thanks. I’m too old to put up for this sort of thing now.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Werewolf: The Apocalypse - Earthblood is such a schlocky, longwinded title that's complimentary for this schlocky "B-game." There's a potent stealth-action template and renowned universe to explore that — sadly — neither of said hopes are fully actualized here. That said, the valiant attempt deserves some credit. Should genre fans go in with modest expectations, perhaps they'll excitedly sink their teeth and claws into it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Anodyne 2: Return to Dust is a bit too long for its 12-ish hours running time, considering its simple gameplay both inside and out of dungeons. Reiterating the same ideas over and again works only for so far. Of course, all games can be called repetitive but it’s only highlighted by Anodyne 2’s pedestrian pace and too many dungeons. The game could have used tightening up its dramaturgy and gameplay to better hit home its heartfelt, timely message (of course, there’s a bad ending, too, that is really bleak). As it is now, the road towards the finale that is worth seeing goes on too long. However, for a two-person development team, Anodyne 2 is a true passion project of games of yesteryear. It’s targeted at people who experienced the exciting transition from 2D consoles to 3D games in the mid-90s and who long after those days when the new technology (that now looks charmingly aged) vowed an entire generation of gamers.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Natsuki Chronicles accommodates newcomers and veterans of the genre without diluting the experience for either. The tight, challenging gameplay and great presentation provide a game that’s well worth playing. Admittedly, the difficulty may be off-putting to some, especially with the occasional difficulty spike. However, Natsuki Chronicles provides the tools to master the gameplay without the tedium often associated with games of its genre. I would wholeheartedly recommend the game to those that appreciate high quality shoot ‘em ups or even just someone looking for a good introduction to the genre.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    Another Dawn is less of a game and more of a reeking pustule residing on a game storefront. While it can't be called "broken" insofar that it can barely be finished, this wretched shooter made me wish the opposite so I’d have a reason to leave earlier.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Outside the career mode there are no significant improvements made to the game, though. The physics and the gameplay remain great and it feels like it’s even more important this time around to balance your rider with the right thumbstick of the controller, especially when landing jumps. When playing the game on PC, I couldn’t help but notice how the visuals drag behind the standards of modern gaming. Character models are the same as before and by each year they get more outdated. Landscapes look bland and boring and there are hardly any particle effects which would have helped to improve the feel of ripping through mud and gravel. Of course, it’s always great when a yearly iteration of a sports game has had courage to revamp its core experience. Granted, the new career mode allows long-lasting gameplay but it’s simply not fun to play anymore.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As a drama about two people falling in and out of love, the script is an amalgam of every relationship ever presented on television and in film, so it is easily relatable if rather trite. If you like abstract puzzles framed around a grounded narrative, then Maquette does offer some value but I don’t see it leaving any long-lasting impressions.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you’re a fan of SHMUPs or action games and platformers, I think the titles are here to be worth your time but for fans of other genres, it’s probably worth holding out to see what future events Capcom plans to hold in this stadium.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Taxi Chaos is like the usual knock-off. At first, it might look and feel the same as the quality product it was fashioned after, but when you get to know it better, it turns out to be just a cheap copy of the original (cheap not in the way of its price because this costs a whopping 30 bucks, mind you). ”But wait”, I hear you cry. ”What if I have never played Crazy Taxi, could I enjoy Taxi Chaos then?” I’m afraid I can’t answer that question because I simply can’t turn off my sweet memory of Crazy Taxi (that I can return to any day, thanks to the backwards compatible X360 version of the game!).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Gods Will Fall is a beautiful mess of ideas that sometimes innovate and surprise and sometimes fall face first into the abyss. The gambling mechanic of entering a dungeon and hoping you rolled an easier area to be better prepared for harder areas later is frankly, awful. As much as I loved almost every other aspect of this game, this one issue brought down an otherwise standout game by at least a full point for me. I may sound a little harsh on this game, but ultimately, I would still encourage people to give this game a shot. There are so many good ideas in here that, despite my hangups, I would still wholeheartedly recommend this to people looking for a fresh take on the roguelike genre.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Nerve is certainly a rollercoaster of an experience, more so than most titles. It is genuinely exhilarating when you fully master a level and move at top speed from the beginning to the end. However, the lengthy memorization process and saturation of visual effects made the lows exceedingly difficult to bear. The narrow focus on exclusively being a hardcore experience left me divided as I found it difficult to play for extended periods of time without getting overburdened by the fast flashing lights and unsatisfying, tedious practice phases. I can only recommend the game to those that are absolutely in love with the idea of a punishing, fast paced title with some of highest highs and lowest lows within the medium.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Werewolf: The Apocalypse – Heart of the Forest is an interesting mix of werewolf myths based on a role-playing codex and real-life eco-activism in the form of a low-key interactive story. There really was protests in Białowieża national forest in 2016 where the game draws its inspiration from. Usually, visual novels are a whole lot less involving as choices in them are often just superficial. Here, though, you must really go under Maia’s skin and talk and act like you would in her place. The game does not try to embrace the world but is a strictly controlled experience. Its prose is punctual and sufficiently descriptive and keeps pace with today’s important matters. The angle is strongly on the side of spirituality and nature, as well as accepting what really makes you. Aided by strong visual sense and deep but not preaching writing, Werewolf: The Apocalypse – Heart of the Forest is a reminiscent of the fact that good gaming entertainment needs nothing more than an intriguing story and necessary means to convey it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While it isn’t perfect, Ys IX: Monstrum Nox is one of the best action-RPGs I’ve played in recent years. With fantastic combat, a compelling story and characters, and exploration which is among my favorite in any recent game, after a slow first hour or two it grabbed me and never let go. Whether you’re a series veteran or you’ve never played an Ys game in your life, you’ll find an adventure that’s well worth taking.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In the end, I enjoyed myself most when I stopped comparing Nioh to Souls games and appreciated it for what it is. Nioh has fast-paced, challenging combat with a deep loot and upgrade system. With well-designed levels and a ton of content, it's easy to sink a lot of time into this visit to Sengoku era Japan.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Pedestrian is one of the best puzzle experiences I’ve had on the console. It starts off strong and carries that energy throughout the rest of the adventure, dishing out new mechanics and obstacles at a comfortable pace that never had me feeling bored or disinterested. Mix together the gameplay with an animated setting and a jaunty musical score and the end result is a delectable delight of video game entertainment.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Little Nightmares II builds greatly upon what the first title achieved, and pushes with great effort to accomplish even more in its setting, design, and gameplay - and it absolutely succeeds in every area of the game. From start to finish of this 4-5 hour experience, you’ll be sat on the edge of your seat, wanting nothing more than to go back in the opposite direction, but the world design and your curiosity will compel you to delve ever deeper into the horrors that await. I am confident that fans of the first game will absolutely love this installment, and any newcomers should go back and play both of these games without a doubt. The settings are both creepy and beautiful, and I really hope to see more from Tarsier Studios in the future.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Medium may lack the sparkle and glam of big games because of its introverted and personal nature but that’s the very reason its take on mental issues holds up so exceptionally well.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Not only does the game look gorgeous but the control system has been enhanced for the Dual Sense with haptic feedbacks and life-like rumble effects as you tear across the pavement. Newcomers to motorcycle racing (or people just wanting a new game for their new PS5) are going to face an uphill climb as they acclimate themselves to the unique complexities of Ride 4’s gameplay demands. There are systems in place to make the experience a bit easier but I would have liked to see a stronger emphasis on the fundamentals of controlling a high-speed bike - and the initial license exam would have been the perfect opportunity for that. As it stands, there might be some substantial hurdles for the player to overcome before they get to a point where they feel like they’ve got a proper handle on Ride 4’s deep approach to simulated racing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Skul: The Hero Slayer has a lot going for it, but it is also muddled with design issues. For all of its creative skull designs, interesting build options, and cool and flashy attacks, I found the experience as a whole to be draining. It’s a case where the core gameplay loop is hindered by its overbearing rogue elements. A genre reliant on repetition has to accommodate for it by offsetting the recursive elements of the game, no matter how good the combat is. Skul: The Hero Slayer is certainly enjoyable on occasion, but its roguelite ingredients ultimately harm the title as a whole.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, this is a fun, deceivingly complex game that portrays mental health in a unique and mostly accurate light. Between the simplified gameplay and lovely and dark graphics, this game is one to add to your collection especially if you enjoy problem solving and puzzles.This reminds me - better go call my therapist.

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