Eurogamer's Scores

  • Games
For 4,687 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Never Alone
Lowest review score: 10 Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines
Score distribution:
5307 game reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    In retrospect, I think Nuts is a game specifically tailored for the plodders, but also the catastrophists. It's for people who shuffle through life methodically, but have minds forever spiralling outwards with plans of possible chaos and misfortune. People who watch squirrels and are maybe a little jealous of their obvious agency, of the glittering clarity of the world in which squirrels seem to operate. Nuts, at times, is a real trip. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 83 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    IO's final World of Assassination game is closer to a seasonal content update than a sequel, but it's a thrilling endeavour all the same. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 83 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    But let's not get carried away. Let's remember that one secret to WOW's success has always been its ability to modernise while staying true to itself, and never pretending to be anything other than the consummate old-school MMO. You can't have a dramatic reversal of fortune when you've actually had 16 years of consistent and smooth progress. You can't call it a comeback when you've always been the king. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Having all that to tinker with is enticing, but right now it's just a pleasure to be reminded of the potency of the formula Turtle Rock introduced all those years back, and to see where it can be pushed with modern technologies and techniques. It's a thrill to see a team back doing what they do best, and for what's shaping up to be a bloody good time. [Hands-on Impressions]
    • 77 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    When I started playing I was fascinated by the landscape beneath. I wanted to hear more about the abandoned, crumbling temples and foundries, the different forms of government and social relations you're told about when you visit each city. I craved an extended mission or two to dig into the origins of the Prophecy. I wondered about the possibility of an antagonist. But towards the end, I felt only indifference, which is a more rarefied, civilised kind of cruelty than the urge to pillage. It feels like this game drifts in the shadow of another game in which the Airborne Kingdom is exactly what it looks like: a ponderous, uncaring monster that eats the world in order to set itself free.
    • 79 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Ustwo follows up Assemble with Care with more quiet restorative magic. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 76 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    A dazzlingly different debut with a haunting sense of place and adventure. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 86 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Honestly, it's a dilemma. Technical issues are often passing, but what lingers is the lack of readiness, in the wider sense. The lack of requisite care. The story is a marvel, as is the sheer, red mist hostility of the world that houses it. The promised depth of systems are there, but mishandled. The maturity - and recall CD Projekt describing Cyberpunk, on announcement, as "a mature RPG for a mature audience" - is often not. Maturity in the immature sense, maybe: the teenage idea of it, that 'maturity' equals Rated M and can be found in nakedness, coarseness, blood and guts, when in actuality it's closer to something like the forced perspective gained from time. My lingering impression of Cyberpunk 2077 is of a game that's shouting over itself, relentlessly at odds with its own creative voice. Amidst it all, the nuance that does exist in Cyberpunk 2077, the intense, intoxicating humanity at its heart, is so nearly engulfed by all the noise. But I think I can still hear it, just about. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 79 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Phogs! is playful and wholesome and stuffed with adorable creatures in a world where everything's larger than life and just a teeny bit odd. There's barely a story, but it doesn't matter as you slip around this peculiar place with its peculiar people and a peculiar, if perfectly happy, two-headed doggy that adores being petted by friendly townsfolk. Bright, bold, and wonderfully accessible, Phogs! is phantastic stuff. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 65 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Awkward, riddled with plot holes and unintentionally offensive, this is Dontnod's worst offering to date. [Eurogamer Avoid]
    • 79 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    I feel for Immortals a bit. Blame Covid, blame budgets, blame Ubisoft, blame the paradoxically thrifty, endlessly repurposing way the publisher makes all its huge, expansive, generous games, but Immortals never really finds its own voice until the very end. It's a skilful, lovingly made product, but it is unmistakably a product, and the best games in this genre all feel like genuine adventures.
    • 63 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    A charismatic and enjoyable gangster sim that gets a big bogged down in admin. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 85 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    New tricks will make the headlines, but Sports Interactive's best move is to breathe new life into the brilliance that's already there. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 61 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Godfall offers obnoxiously stylish next-gen spectacle, but its appeal only runs skin deep.
    • 79 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Don't overlook this joyous explosion of colour and charm - I very nearly did, and I'm kicking myself for it. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 76 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Treyarch delivers an impressive package considering the circumstances, but Black Ops Cold War feels like a step back from last year.
    • 77 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Treyarch delivers an impressive package considering the circumstances, but Black Ops Cold War feels like a step back from last year.
    • 78 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Zelda gets the Dynasty Warriors treatment once more, folding in inspiration from Breath of the Wild for the best musou spin-off yet. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 65 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    In a world of compromised visions, The Falconeer is dazzlingly original. An aerial combat game unlike any other. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 92 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    There's friction between the original and this lavish remake, but this is a scintillating launch title that shows off the PS5's strengths. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 80 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Tetris Effect gets the multiplayer of its dreams with four delightful modes. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 80 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Robert Louis Stevenson used to play with his stepson's soldiers when he was sick in bed, an act that seems impossible to disentangle from his rangy, childlike, often febrile imagination. The Pathless is a little chillier than that - there are clear reminders throughout that key people from the team that made this also made stuff like Journey, with its cold poise - but it retains something of that dream of play. Speed and imagination and great beasts burning in the trees. I had fun.
    • 72 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Bugsnax is colourful, clever, and surprising - and you deserve to discover the deepest aspects of it for yourself. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 84 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It is a Viking saga which does at times struggle a little in reaching its destiny, and in its efforts to evolve the series has made some sacrifices to tell a stronger overall story. But it wins through, in the end quite easily, as it continues the Assassin's Creed saga for a new generation. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 85 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Given the circumstances that Marvel's Spider-Man: Miles Morales releases into, it's heartening to have a tale that's so eager to see the best in everyone, and that strives for diversity in a world divided. In that way, Spider-Man: Miles Morales' message of hope feels like the right sentiment for this very moment. It's escapism with a social conscience, a timely, tremendous thing right now. Insomniac's second crack at Spider-Man retains the breathless energy of the original, but ends up a lot like Miles Morales himself - still fresh on its feet, a little awkward in places, but steadily growing into itself. It's a game that's full of character, and a tremendously likeable one it is too. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 83 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    While promising a glimpse of the future, Astro's Playroom is a gloriously old-fashioned thing at heart, a characterful, character-driven platformer that has been built to showcase a particular piece of hardware. So often that's where magic in video games happens, and that's most certainly the case here. On its own, this is a beautifully crafted, exquisitely paced and absolutely gorgeous 3D platformer. Combined with the hardware it's bundled on, it's something very special indeed - and one of the best launch titles I can remember in an age.
    • 82 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    A fast-paced arcade game with the soul of a puzzler. [Eurogamer Recommended]
    • 83 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Yakuza: like A Dragon is a good game - sometimes it's okay, sometimes it's great, sometimes it made me groan. It runs the full gamut of emotions, from boredom to disbelief. The will to reinvent itself is there, and that means not everything works - whether you'll enjoy it or not depends on what aspects you care about the most.
    • 76 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Legion's near-future London is almost too close for comfort, though the game it hosts is a characterless slog.
    • 83 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    A new studio in charge sees Dirt retain some of its old swagger in a fun, frequently beautiful but occasionally hollow arcade racer.

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