Newsweek's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,401 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Barton Fink
Lowest review score: 0 Meet Joe Black
Score distribution:
1401 movie reviews
  1. Full of invention, but under the colorful icing is a slightly stale cake.
  2. It’s sad to see such stunning work self-destruct. You walk out haunted by the movie that might have been.
    • Newsweek
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A film of ideas; meaty ideas about Catholicism, faith, and the true nature of jealousy, love and hate, that are rarely contemplated in today's cinema.
    • Newsweek
  3. Scott's finesse can't entirely disguise the mechanical nature of Nicholas and Ted Griffin's script, which has one too many twists for its own good. Fun while it lasts, but it's a bit of a con job itself.
  4. "The Final Frontier" is not as witty as the last installment, nor as well made as "The Search for Spock." But it has the Trek essence in spades. [19 June 1989, p.63]
    • Newsweek
  5. For the most part, however, Beaches is lean cuisine. It's not quite good enough to ring with any authenticity and not quite tasteless enough to be a glitzy, trashy wallow. But it has one enormous, undeniable asset: Bette Midler. [26 Dec 1988, p.66]
    • Newsweek
  6. Working from an intermittently clever script by Diane Thomas, director Robert Zemeckis, a talented Spielberg protege (Used Cars), sets his sights on fun and proceeds to blast away at our defenses. Some of the fun is real, but much of it seems grimly willed, which tends to be more exhausting than entertaining. Douglas himself is a less than ideal choice as a hip Indy Jones adventurer -- there's no sense of self-enjoyment in his swagger. But Turner more than compensates. [16 Apr 1984, p.93]
    • Newsweek
  7. Ray
    It's hobbled by the too-familiar conventions of the musical biopic: with so many chapters of Charles's life to cover, Hackford's movie never finds a rhythm, a groove, to settle into. It wins its battles without winning the war.
    • Newsweek
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In the second half the film meanders into all the danger areas one might expect: predictable plot twists, tearful separation scenes between the lovers, and even a joyful reunion in Rome.
  8. Lowe and Spader are quite good as alter egos of the moral shallows. But the film goes from shallow to callow. Director Curtis Hanson and writer David Koepp have turned out a glossy but hollow film noir that makes virtue and decadence equally vapid. [26 Mar 1990, p.53]
    • Newsweek
  9. But if the endpoint is a homiletic given, the journey itself is more charming, and less sentimental, than you might suspect.
  10. There are just enough fresh, funny gags and witty throwaways to keep the 88-minute MIB2 percolating -- it fulfills its end of the bargain: a good time will be had by almost all.
    • Newsweek
  11. American Flyers is too accomplished not to wring tears, but you may want to kick and scream before you succumb. [09 Sep 1985, p.90]
    • Newsweek
  12. After the taut and troubling Unforgiven, Clint Eastwood's A Perfect World feels like a breather. As usual, you can expect solid, no-fuss craftsmanship, but it's best to set your expectations down a notch.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Tries too hard to prove it has a "heart" when the whole point is that its subjects do not.
  13. For those who believe that movies are a proper place to explore the riddle of sex, no holds barred, this movie is de rigueur.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Robert Rodriguez's second effort is a funny, craftily written piece of low-grade horror crapola.
  14. Paradise Alley lacks Rocky's primal simplicity: It's a parade of outrageous ploys that come pelting at you from all angles. [13 Nov 1978, p.106]
    • Newsweek
  15. Relieved of his courting duties, Allen gives his funniest performance in ages.
  16. The preposterousness of the premise (concocted by writers Perry Howze and Randy Howze) is the appeal of Chances Are. The problem is the execution. Where "Heaven Can Wait" seduced you into belief with its expert comic timing and romantic urgency, director Emile ("Dirty Dancing") Ardolino's fantasy grows increasingly labored as it piles improbability upon psychological impossibility. [20 March 1989, p.83]
    • Newsweek
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Like Norma Desmond in "Sunset Boulevard," Indy is still big; it's just that, in the new world of movie franchises, The Crystal Skull feels smaller.
  17. In the antic, melancholy comedy The Royal Tenenbaums, the singular Wes Anderson (“Rushmore”) abandons his native Texas for a storybook vision of New York.
    • Newsweek
  18. Unlike some other Landis movies, the harmlessly silly Three Amigos never wanders too far afield in pursuit of a laugh. It's a well-wrought giggle machine. [15 Dec 1986, p.83]
    • Newsweek
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Careening wildly between fairy tale and drama it doesn't know when to call it quits.
    • Newsweek
  19. Films about great theatrical divas (so temperamental! So divine!) all strike familiar notes. This Somerset Maugham adaptation is no exception. But Annette Bening, playing the queen of the '30s London stage, makes it worth another go-round.
  20. Has a quiet sense of community, a wry, unsentimental sweetness, that grows on you. It's a patient movie for impatient times.
    • Newsweek
  21. Zoo
    Zoo avoids any taint of exploitation, but it errs on the opposite extreme. I came away from it wanting a little less Art and a lot more simple reportage.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A surprisingly earnest and cautionary movie, careful to attract female viewers and not freak parents out too badly.
  22. The Hunger is slick, silly and not without thrills. [09 May 1983, p.85]
    • Newsweek
  23. Not every movie -- even one based on an unproduced Kurosawa screenplay -- has to be about Life itself. Oh well, enjoy it for the thrills, and don't worry about trying to keep a straight face. [30 Dec 1985, p.62]
    • Newsweek

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