St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,065 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Beasts of the Southern Wild
Lowest review score: 0 The Divergent Series: Insurgent
Score distribution:
1,065 movie reviews
  1. Her
    Her may be the most technologically astute movie since Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: a Space Odyssey.” And as the friendly ghost in the machine, Samantha is a more inviting companion for the great leap forward than HAL9000 could ever dream of being.
  2. Winter's Bone is the best film of the year.
  3. A stark, contemplative and hauntingly brilliant film.
  4. A comedy of discomfort -- and one of their (Coen brothers) best, most insightful and most provocative films.
  5. Cotillard gets so persuasively inside Sandra’s skin that it’s not at all surprising that this performance has earned her another Oscar nomination. And she does so without resorting to shameless, award-baiting grandstanding.
  6. Fruitvale Station has all the impact of a thoroughly researched, well-argued documentary. But Coogler made the right choice in going with drama.
  7. With such supercharged material under the hood, a magnetic man behind the wheel and a nimble director manning the pits, Senna is simply the greatest sports film I have ever seen.
  8. Ultimately hopeful, but uncompromising in its commitment to exposing a tragic chapter in history.
  9. When films are good, actors and directors get a lot of the credit that should go to the screenwriters. In the case of Silver Linings Playbook, which is one of the best films of the year, there is a popcorn bowl of glory to go around.
  10. The best film of the year and perhaps the purest love story in cinematic history.
  11. A film that's at once timely and timeless.
  12. Lots of films claim to be different. Birdman is.
  13. At once an unforgettable war film and a brilliant character study.
  14. In a stunning performance, Teller resists the impulse to sugarcoat Andrew’s egocentricity. Simmons is equally impressive, lending Fletcher just enough humanity to render his monstrousness all the more shocking.
  15. Up in the Air may not end up as the best picture -- that will be decided by the Academy -- but it has landed in the middle of the discussion because it's laser-focused and right on time.
  16. Shot mostly in black and white and imbued with a romanticism that's at once nostalgic and exhilarating, Tetro sneaks up on you. What threatens to be a mere exercise in style proves to be as involving as it is inventive.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Die Hard 2, which is far and away the best of the big summer action pictures, is an almost perfect blend of suspense, thrills, human drama and, perhaps most important, comedy. [6 July 1990, p.3F]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  17. Oyelowo takes full advantage of his close physical resemblance to King, but he wisely avoids mere impersonation, delivering a performance that’s as sensitive as it is spellbinding.
  18. An exhilarating balancing act, at once a science-fiction romp, a paranoid thriller and a philosophical treatise.
  19. The film would be incalculably different if the lead role had been divided between two or three young actors for a conventional shoot. But Linklater’s patience allows us to see a thoughtful personality being formed both on and off the screen.
  20. Involves the gradual revelation of the hopes, fears and insecurities of well-observed characters.
  21. Nev and the filmmakers prove to be charismatic, and at times hilarious, investigators of the unfolding mystery.
  22. The combination of a literate script, an adroit cast and an economical style is simple addition that achieves an alchemical feat: the best film of the year.
  23. Bursting with smart dialogue, surprising situations and humor that springs from richly imagined characters.
  24. The conclusion of Christopher Nolan's superhero trilogy is a hugely ambitious mix of eye candy and brain food. If it doesn't have the haunting aftertaste of the previous serving, that's only because Nolan couldn't clone Heath Ledger. But beefy substitute Tom Hardy is a hell of a villain.
  25. Surrender, earthlings. It’s the Guardians’ world and you’ll be happy to live in it.
  26. Sophisticated comedies have gone out of fashion, largely because Hollywood finds it easier and more profitable to simply gross out moviegoers. But Please Give has real class -- and for that it deserves our gratitude.
  27. It starts as a bittersweet parable about the cruelty of commerce, but the wonder of Searching for Sugar Man will not soon slip away.
  28. As much as anything, the wildly entertaining ’70s flashback American Hustle is a triumph of style.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is Daisy's story, and Hoke's story. It's a beautiful story, filled with warmth and compassion. It was a glorious evening of theater when I saw it, and it's just as glorious on the screen. [12 Jan. 1990, p.3F]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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