The A.V. Club's Scores

For 1,610 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Lorena: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Pacific Heat: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1157
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1157
1157 tv reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    This last batch of episodes is poetic, heavy with heart and soul, and provides a satisfying conclusion to a story that’s been (mostly) a joy to watch unfold.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The twists and turns in this six-episode offering are also very well-paced, and the show gives us a nice cliffhanger that sets up a potential second season. It’s a fun binge-watch that meets the promise of its premise—and is thoughtfully crafted and well-acted to boot.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    A twee, not-so-irreverent, premise-driven comedic drama that pits sunny, beachy Australian gallows humor against cynical American opportunism, and lightly roasts religious dogma with Mafia viciousness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Overall, the whole production seems much more comfortable in its second outing. Many characters feel more lived-in and less reductive, and the writing has gotten much funnier.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    While the process of them learning the ins and outs of choreography, performance, and makeup is often glossed over in favor of exploring their personal traumas and past struggles, it’s understandable. The sincerity and ferocity with which the show addresses and then moves past this pain turns the series into a vital viewing experience, not an exploitative one, making this yet another dazzling season of We’re Here.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    While Evolution certainly doesn’t reinvent any hallmarks of crime dramas—this is Criminal Minds, after all—the serialized nature of the new season gradually builds intrigue that will ultimately make a final showdown between Volt and the BAU much more satisfying.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    The show’s dialogue is flavorless at best and laughable at worst. ... Though she has zero to work with, horror-movie fave Ortega does what she can with her character, nailing the deadpan delivery Christina Ricci perfected in the ’90s movies. ...Others caught up in this dreck include Gwendoline Christie, Riki Lindhome, and Fred Armisen. What’s more, horror legend Tim Burton directed half the season’s episodes; but the show’s visual language is so flat that you’d never know.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    There simply isn’t enough characterization in the preceding episodes to justify a particularly deep investment in these people, one might feel largely ambivalent about Amber’s fate until halfway through the season—at which point the show, much like Amber, might be beyond saving
  1. It’s more overly sentimental and predictable than expected, sure, but Jen and Judy’s undying love was always the driving force. Applegate and Cardellini sell the hell out of it, balancing the comedic and emotional beats perfectly.
  2. The series avoids a sophomore slump because co-creators Mindy Kaling and Justin Noble embrace the qualities that made the show successful. Chief among them is the connection between the leads.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Tulsa ranks as another sturdy chapter in the volume of prestigious, showy 21st century antiheroism.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Fleishman Is In Trouble is a sharp, fierce, and funny adaptation of a truly great novel.
  3. There are hints of an in-depth, poignant tale hidden within The English, as Eli and Cornelia struggle with retaining parts of their identities after experiencing tragedy. But the show so explicitly wants to establish its Western atmosphere that the plot becomes an afterthought.
  4. Mood doesn’t tie it all up with a neat bow, and is quite bleak overall, but it’s nevertheless a resonant and hopeful story about finding your power. As a bonus, Lecky makes the journey euphonic for us, too.
  5. Actually, every performer in Blockbuster elevates the weak writing, transforming the show from passable to pleasant enough. ... However, Blockbuster truly struggles with the laughs, in that there are barely any.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    While they excel much more in the light-hearted moments than the dramatic ones, the Lopezes, as co-leads, play effectively off of each other, making it easy to wonder which storylines have been mined from conversations in their own personal lives and which ones have yet to be had.
  6. There are gaps this time around, though. Maya Rudolph’s Connie isn’t as present (although Rudolph gets to flex her muscles as Diane, Nick’s loving mom who is at the end of her rope). Supporting characters like Jordan Peele’s Duke Ellington, David Thewlis’ Shame Monster, and Ali Wong’s Ali don’t get sufficient screen time. ... Despite these minor flaws, Big Mouth remains one of Netflix’s superior creative comedies.
  7. The attention to detail in everything from thrill-inducing soundscapes that conjure dug-up graves to meticulously art-directed spaces that are truly haunting elevates these terrifying short horror tales.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Season two is a continuation of the team’s well-honed brand of quick-hitting, time-hopping narration, giving a 360-degree view of a beloved musical variety show. ... If something doesn’t work for you there’s surely something else coming right behind. Something else in a steady, heady funk, set entirely to its own beat. Something delicious because you don’t know quite how to process it, and nobody is giving a clue.
  8. As a show of meals doled out over distinct episodes, From Scratch is handily engaging, even if the final product never quite adds up to the sum of its sumptuous parts. Perhaps it’s best to understand it as comfort food of a television show that only sometimes feels algorithmically created.
  9. The personable cast carries the creators' vision of a New York full of false hope, made tolerable by a network of friends. And then there's that Bob James theme song, so pretty and forlorn, playing in the opening credits over an endless shot of a cab crossing a bridge and never getting anywhere. It's the whole mood and meaning of the show, established in less than a minute.
  10. Hunnam is charming and riveting, bringing depth and expressiveness to Lin, and Saraf is a treat. But they can’t overcome below-average performances from the rest of the ensemble, who often feature cartoonish accents.
  11. An engaging, if uneven, YA series that rests its premise on the palliative power of storytelling. ... Overall, though, and especially as an October Netflix offering for those famished for some Flanagan horror fare, The Midnight Club is a worthy binge-watch.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Let The Right One In just falls flat. As the series jumps between goofy romance, crime procedural, family drama, and horror, it loses all its narrative steam.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite the sizable scale of its emergencies, which is a commendable achievement in visual effects, the show’s first two episodes feel bound to the conventions of its overcrowded genre and hardly break any new ground in terms of characterization, introducing a painfully thin set of characters who lack the chemistry necessary for weekly appointment television.
  12. Peacock’s series remains compelling as it draws out the full extent of Berchtold’s psychological abuse. It’s not perfect, but it’s the in-depth treatment the case deserves beyond AIPS and its accompanying podcast. The real Jan and Mary Ann already documented their experiences in a memoir, but their contribution to AFOTF is what cements it as an undoubtedly difficult but unmissable project.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Purposefully weaves overlooked parts of U.S. history into the narrative to create a refreshingly inclusive and subversive take on the old-fashioned western, honoring its classic cornerstones while bringing some much-needed and long-overdue diversity to the genre.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Just two episodes were provided for critics pre-air, but already Chucky is telling an interesting, somewhat cohesive story built on the franchise’s strong points. Season two is unlikely to draw many new fans, but for the faithful, one of the best spooky shows on TV has stepped up its game.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    AMC’s Interview is a novel thing; it does for bloodsucker drama what HBO’s Watchmen did for the superhero genre, reclaiming an old story for a new, more enlightened generation.
  13. A celebration of the delightful messiness of human connection in a world that would push you to isolate yourself lest you be hurt by those you most gravitate toward, this episodic story about boy-meets-girl finds new textures in an otherwise familiar story.

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