Tired Old Hack's Scores

  • Games
For 0 reviews, this publication has graded:
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On average, this publication grades 0 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 0
Score distribution:
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  2. Mixed: 0 out of
  3. Negative: 0 out of
70 game reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    With two full adventures packed with secrets, a brilliantly difficult Challenges mode and thoroughly entertaining multiplayer, it’ll take you ages to see everything on offer here. It may not be ‘New’, but it’s certainly ‘Super’.
    • 67 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It’s hard to nail down whether you should be playing this game, because it really depends on your tolerance for style over substance. The actual game itself is a fairly mindless hack and slash affair with little in the way of character upgrades or progression (a basic levelling system and collectable abilities aside), and while it’s perfectly entertaining to play it isn’t going to win any awards on that front. But in terms of its plot, its knowing humour, its countless references and its downright insanity, I’m confident in saying that you won’t play another game like this on the Switch. I absolutely loved it as a result of this and consider it one of the most entertaining games I’ve played in a while: if you’re more interested in depth than daftness, though, your mileage may vary.
    • 69 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    How long the game will ultimately last will depend on how much you (or your child) are willing to think outside the cardboard box and tinker with your own creations. If you’re only willing to stick to the pre-designed projects the game has prepared for you, you probably won’t get more than 10 hours of gameplay out of it. Those 10 hours will be a good laugh, though.
    • 62 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    On the Wii, Go Vacation was trying to enter homes that most likely already had at least two sporting mini-game titles in their library. What we have now on the Switch is a situation where there’s no Wii Sports, no Wii Sports Resort and nothing else decent that’s really like them. In this day and age, Go Vacation stands alone as the sole option for anyone who fancies dipping back into the Wii days. And those who do will be more than happy with what they find.
    • 82 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    No, this Switch version is clearly aimed at those who missed out on Captain Toad the first time around. If that’s you, then there’s no better time to fill your boots: even four years later it remains an absolutely charming adventure and one that’s still a treat to play.
    • 75 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    How much enjoyment you’ll get out of Mario Tennis Aces depends firmly on how you plan on playing it. If you’re a loner and don’t play online you can have the story mode and tournaments licked within a day if you’re good. If you’re up for some online multiplayer you’re going to get a lot more out of it, but as it stands there may not be enough to ensure you’re still jumping in six months from now. Get some similarly-skilled friends together for some local multiplayer, though, and this has the potential to be another one of those timeless Nintendo party classics like Mario Kart and Smash Bros.
    • 78 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    The Definitive Edition name is an accurate one. Although it doesn’t offer a lot of exclusive content (a couple of Breath Of The Wild costumes for Link and Zelda are about as good as it gets) no other version of Hyrule Warriors contains absolutely everything released for it to date. There’s no question that this is by far the most comprehensive and best-looking version of the game, and while those who owned either version and all the DLC may have fewer reasons to buy it, if you haven’t played it before – or just owned the base game and didn’t fork out for any downloadable content – there’s hundreds of hours of gameplay here for you.
    • 86 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    If Tropical Freeze passed you by when it was on Wii U and you fancy yourself a bit of a platformer fan, then it’s an absolute no-brainer: it’s a gorgeous game packed with inventive levels and should present you with a serious challenge (even on Funky Mode). If this game is new to you, I can’t recommend it enough. If, on the other hand, you already bought and played through the Wii U game then it really comes down to how eager you are to play it again.
    • 73 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    In a world where gaming is getting increasingly complex with loot boxes and microtransactions and season passes and whatever dabbing is supposed to be, Kirby Star Allies is refreshingly consistent with the old way of gaming. It’s the video game equivalent of the old blanket you’ve had in your house for decades. It’s nothing flashy and you wouldn’t necessarily show it off to your friends when they’re over at your house. But when times are hard and life’s getting too much, it’s sometimes great to just snuggle under it (this time with up to three family members) and enjoy its simple comforts like you’ve done for years.
    • 90 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    You’ll have to decide for yourself whether a game that’s this sexualised is to your tastes tonally. The actual combat and gunplay, however, is far less contentious: there’s a reason Xbox and PlayStation owners were livid that Bayonetta 2 was a Wii U exclusive, and if you’re a Switch owner who missed out the last time, now you get the chance to find out why. Don’t pass it up.
    • 57 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    If playing with three other friends is something you can see happening regularly, you might want to consider it because it can be great fun. Otherwise, the variations on arena battling here only capture your attention for so long before the whole thing starts feeling flat. Unless you regularly play as a quartet, this is sadly not one of Kirby’s finest offerings.
    • 53 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It plays a fairly decent game of Monopoly. The real question for fans of the board game will be whether you think £29.99 / $39.99 is a fair price for the Switch version, given that it’s only a third of that price on Xbox One and PS4.
    • 42 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It’s a very interesting game that deals with some deep topics – the likes of abortion and facism are discussed in certain story branches – and I appreciate the developer’s effort at trying something different. At its price it may be a tiny bit too steep for what it offers, so if you aren't convinced you may want to wait for a price drop in the future.
    • 74 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    After a few hours you’ll find the constant combination of magic, standard attacks and rolling out of the way eventually gets a wee bit repetitive. Still, considering it only takes five hours or so to beat, it doesn’t overstay its welcome too much and as the credits roll you’ll be happy with the charming adventure you’ve just had.
    • 64 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    I like Gear Club Unlimited, but it’s carried over slightly too much of its mobile heritage to the Switch version. While it’s commendable that its microtransactions and timers are gone, its awkward menus and short races mean it still hasn’t entirely killed off what it used to be.
    • 74 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    If you’ve got a couple of quid lying around in your eShop account, you could do a hell of a lot worse than chucking it at Knight Terrors. It's got that elusive one-more-go factor that’ll have you playing it for longer than games twenty times its price.
    • 45 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Violett’s landscapes are a true work of art, but they’re the setting for a series of point-and-click puzzles that are too abstract to make the game a must-have.
    • 77 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It’s got cracking music, a load of subtle nods to the home computer days and has enough head-scratchers to keep you thinking without necessarily completely stumping you.
    • 69 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Combat is passable, the music is great, it’s visually fine: chances are you’ve seen numerous retro-inspired roguelikes this before, albeit maybe not with this particular gimmick. What lets Moon Hunters down, though, is that while it’s perfectly entertaining to play in short bursts, its loading times can completely ruin the experience.
    • 64 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    There’s a great game in Rime that’s dying to get out, but a myriad of flaws mean you’re never too far from another immersion-shattering glitch or freeze.
    • 79 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    LA Noire is well worth a look if you didn’t play it the first time around. Like Skyrim, the Switch version isn’t so significantly visually inferior to the PS4 and Xbox One versions that you’d be buying a greatly inferior product if you opted for that: as ever, the ability to play on the move is one to bear in mind.
    • 84 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It may look a bit dated these days – especially on a system where the vast majority of players own Breath Of The Wild – but Skyrim still has the potential to take hundreds of hours from you.
    • 79 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    If the Switch is the only current-gen system you own, Doom is a no-brainer for anyone into R-rated action games. If you own a PS4 or Xbox One, it comes down to how often you use your Switch as a handheld device. Doom on the move is great and well worth it, but if you use your TV more then you should get it on Sony or Microsoft’s system instead.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    As a completely free game, I adored the half-hour I spent playing Dead Horizon and reading its lore book. I’d urge you to do the same: it’s the perfect proof that not all stories have to be long to feel epic.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    If you regularly play local multiplayer with three or more players, Party Golf is well worth a look. Not since Towerfall have I enjoyed a four-player game so much. A warning, though: play it on your TV. The balls are far too small for tabletop mode.
    • 66 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    I didn’t expect I’d think much of this one, but it kept me entertained for a while: It’s a fun low-fi game that lets you just switch your brain off a bit between Mario Odyssey moon hunts.
    • 51 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    For only $4.99 it may keep you busy for a while, but you’re likely to be bored with it before all 80 stages are complete.
    • 73 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Most of your time during this game’s 8-10 hour story will be spent figuring out how to reach the next area, usually involving some sort of block-pushing, switch-flipping or trunk-blowing mechanic. That may sound like a complaint, but it really isn’t: as long as you’re happy for it to be more of a puzzler than an action game, you’ll still enjoy it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    The procedurally generated levels are rarely exciting to explore, and the characters and enemies are so nondescript that making your way through its 32 stages is as much a test of your attention span as it is your abilities. It’s fine. It’s harmless. It just doesn’t do anything remarkable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Once you realise it’s all about chaining together kills – time slows down for a while after each one, and getting a few in a row grants you special abilities – everything clicks and it becomes fun to play. On a personal level, I still reckon Jydge is my twin-stick shooter of choice on the Switch, but Time Recoil is an interesting alternative.

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