UploadVR's Scores

  • Games
For 311 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 24% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Ultrawings 2
Lowest review score: 20 Heavy Fire: Red Shadow
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 31 out of 311
354 game reviews
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    Ultimately, The Atlas Mystery is a good escape room mystery game but could be greatly improved by adding more interactivity and placing greater emphasis on the story. The setting and particularly the excellent soundtrack is worthy of a greater scope, perhaps with added voice acting and more room to explore. The game is a decent way to spend a couple of hours, but only real escape room buffs will get a higher level of appreciation out of it.
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    Though there’s still room for improvement, Anotherway and Vertigo Games have landed on a concept that is addicting and completely unique. There’s really nothing else quite like Unplugged on the Quest platform – or any VR platform, for that matter. It’s a shining example of how VR and AR technology can offer totally unique experiences, previously thought unimaginable. It sounds too good to be true, but it’s not. For that reason alone, every Quest owner should give Unplugged a try. [Upload Essential]
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    Fans of God-sims and city builders will find a lot to enjoy in Townsmen VR, and even newcomers to those genres will appreciate how well the extensive tutorial guides players through the process of creation and combat. The ability to change perspectives and enjoy the world from different levels provides a new level of immersion for this genre that is very welcome.
    • 83 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    For the most part, Moss: Book 2 is the satisfying sequel you’d expect. It adds brilliant new gameplay mechanics that make for some innovative combat encounters, whilst puzzles prove to be a surprise highlight. More impressive, though, are some of the ways the game catches you off-guard with both the story and that series-defining bond you establish with Quill reaching new heights. But, just as with the first entry, you’re left wanting more of just about everything; its a longer game but still on the lean side, ending just as its best ideas start to get fleshed out. Greedy as it may sound, this still isn’t the sweeping epic you know this series has in it, but instead another reassuring step towards getting there. I’m convinced Polyarc has that game in its future but, for now, Moss: Book 2 is another excellent chapter in a wider story for Quill that drives home that familiar feeling that the best is still to come. [Upload Recommended]
    • 83 Metascore
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    Cosmonious High is another fantastic place to start for VR newcomers but, four games in, maybe it’s time Owlchemy started to think about loosening those training wheels a little.
    • 61 Metascore
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    After The Fall fills a hole in the VR market that’s been empty for far too long. It’s a polished, engaging shooter that will get its hooks into you after even just a few of its Harvest Runs thanks to the remarkable ease with which you can find friends to play with on any headset. But it’s also true that this is a mechanically straightforward shooter that’s closer to the breezy simplicity of Arizona Sunshine than it is the rivals that have long since surpassed Vertigo’s original VR hit. But that’s a calculated decision, and one that will likely work in After The Fall’s favor as it seeks to grow as large a userbase as possible. The verdict’s not quite in yet, but After The Fall might just be the co-op VR shooter to beat.
    • 80 Metascore
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    This is a full-hearted marvel with the capacity for laughter and amazement, paired with the mechanical intricacy with substance. In short, you’d be a sucker to miss Tentacular. [UploadVR Recommended]
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    HitchHiker is a game that should work best in VR but ends up as likely the weakest version of an otherwise interesting experiment. The core mystery at the heart of the experience is intriguing, but it’s overly protracted by tiresome conversations, visually bland environments and limited VR design. VR storytelling can’t be as passive as its flatscreen counterparts; it needs, brevity, wit and interaction to hold a user’s attention, otherwise boredom sets in quickly. An abridged version of HitchHiker that allows players to fully immerse themselves in their journey without slogging through 40+ minute, technically imprecise chapters might be a much more compelling experience. As it stands, unless you’re really into mystery narratives, you should probably just keep walking.
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    Vox Machinae’s single-player campaign is an appreciated if flawed addition to an already-fun multiplayer mech combat title. Plodding pacing and padded story elements slow your progress to a crawl, but it still retains the game’s deliberate and considered combat, which successfully blends a purposeful amount of rustic clumsiness and lumbering heft. Even if you don’t care for the single-player’s offerings, the frantic class-based multiplayer proved it was worth the price of entry years ago — though we’re still to deliver our final verdict there — and, though there are other mech combat games available, few capture the sense of scale and power on display here. Like its own monolithic war machines, Vox Machinae is a scrappy underdog, but one that’s very much worth rooting for.
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    • 100 Critic Score
    Ultrawings 2 is the exact kind of VR sequel we’ve been hoping for, building upon the original’s modest beginnings with a massive increase in scope and variety whilst retaining its air-tight controls and level design. Between the five wildly different aircraft and the addition of combat there are plenty of gripping new challenges to pull you in, and the game is always ready to serve up a different kind of thrill. Whether it’s the cinematic satisfaction of blasting past an enemy as they erupt into flames or the laser-like focus needed to land a plane in one piece, Ultrawings 2 either had me grinning like an idiot or on the edge of my seat. It doesn’t make all the right calls, but VR doesn’t get much more rewarding than this superb follow-up.
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    I’ve been really encouraged by my opening hours with Zenith, then. If you’re not into MMOs then the familiar structure and stat-driven focus probably won’t talk you round, but the game does experiment with the VR format to provide some interesting interactivity and a lot of the key features you’d expect from the biggest MMOs out there are ready and waiting on day one. Simply put, Ramen VR is in a very good position on launch day (which, again, could be impeded by server launch issues). What I’ll be looking to see now is how those foundations build out into something more compelx and rewarding across the hopefully tens of hours of content that’s included in the game right now, because that’s where Zenith will really live or die.
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    • 60 Critic Score
    Garden of the Sea is a game to let sink in more than it is to be played. Its story mode, whilst certainly pleasant, is over far too quickly to stir up much intrigue, but it’ll make up for it if you’re the kind of player that likes to sit with an experience for a while, customizing and growing out your own space if for nothing else but personal satisfaction and relaxation. Even this element of the game is a bit too modest in scope to make Garden of the Sea the definitive destination for VR meditation, but it’s an undeniably warm and effortlessly likable getaway all the same.
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    • 80 Critic Score
    Cooking Simulator VR does what it says on the tin and does it very well. If you want, it can be a really satisfying cooking experience with a long list of recipes, a rock-solid career mode and almost exactly the right degree of intricacy to its mechanics. Or you can turn it into an utter madhouse and watch its systems collide in a glorious ode to kitchen fires and food poisoning. You’ll need a decent rig to sustain the mayhem and if ever a VR game needed haptic feedback, it’s this, but Cooking Simulator VR delivers a robust and realistic experience worthy of a chef’s kiss.
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    • 80 Critic Score
    Warplanes: WW1 Fighters might not be the most flashy flight spectacle you’ll find in VR — or even on Quest — but its winning strategy of offering a variety of control schemes and play modes to suit just about everyone’s tastes, then launching user-made missions for a rich supply of content, makes it a real treat. Whether you’re looking for co-op hangouts with co-pilots or simply seeking the authentic thrills of a lost era of warfare, this has something for you. Here’s hoping for a sequel that doubles down on the presentation and fully realizes this particular theater of war for VR.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    My heart bleeds for Warhammer Age of Sigmar: Tempestfall. It’s a game of genuinely admirable aspiration that, in many ways, is painfully close to achieving its goals. But every time I started to settle into its gorgeous world and brilliantly over-the-top-lore one of its many issues would make itself known. The combat is a mess in need of a significant overhaul, the UI is fussy and unhelpful, and a string of bugs and puzzle roadblocks kill any sense of momentum. With more time under the hood, a lot of these issues could have been refined and Tempestfall would have been a highlight in a meager year for PC VR releases. As it stands, this offering might be only worthy of Sigmar’s wrath.
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    • 60 Critic Score
    With some lovely visuals and straightforward mechanics, Moon Mode’s made excellent use of spatial gameplay in a manner only VR could achieve. Creating new settlements is entertaining and while there’s not much here for genre veterans, it’s worth remembering who Spacefolk City’s targeting. If you’re after a city builder with smaller scope, you’d do well to check this out.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Resident Evil 4 VR is an incredible, if not definitive take on an all-time classic. There are a lot of rough edges to this port like the constant cutting to virtual screens, lack of spatial audio and certain combat encounters that simply don’t translate well to VR. But, for every moment of Wii-waggle boulder dodging or tarnished memories of once much more demanding boss fights, developer Armature mines gold elsewhere. Whether it’s the brilliantly redesigned puzzles, the slick satisfaction of pulling off headshots with careful aim or simply taking in this world of terror from a fresh new angle, there are a lot of reasons to relive the horror. I suspect it’s best enjoyed as a novel way to revisit one of the all-time greats than it is to approach fresh but whatever your circumstances, you’re bound to enjoy the ride. Games like The Walking Dead: Saints & Sinners might be the future of VR, but Resident Evil 4 is a welcome reminder that it’s well worth looking to the past too.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Lone Echo 2’s incredible production values and first-rate immersion make for an enjoyable swansong that’s let down by its plodding pace and familiarity. Despite arriving four years after the groundbreaking original, there’s very little that will surprise you here and, although well written, the drawn-out character dialogue quickly wears thin. It’s still held up by a fantastic locomotion system with first-rate immersion alongside a solid story with believable performances, but the startling spark of blockbuster innovation that fuelled the first game has long-since died out. Jack and Liv’s mission to get back to the past makes for a fun ride, but parts of Lone Echo 2 were stuck there to begin with.
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    • 60 Critic Score
    Loco Dojo doesn’t rewrite the rules on the party game format, but it successfully finds the fun in adding VR to that template. Its best games are brilliantly entertaining explorations of the different kinds of experiences the platform offers and, although it has some structural issues, tournaments move with a pace that makes them easy to jump into and tempting to replay time and again. It might be hard to realize a family game night in VR but if you and your friends find yourselves in four corners of the globe with an Oculus Quest each, Loco Dojo is a good way to capture the camaraderie often reserved for local play.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I am, if you couldn’t tell, quite in love with Song in the Smoke, then. It’s rough, yes, and some of its design ideas need a second pass. But it’s also an intoxicating trip, an experience directly connected to the beating heart of nature and acutely aware of the structure and interaction needed to make its survival gameplay work in VR. All of this is thrown into a mortar and crushed beneath a pestle to conjure a game in which you can practically feel the slip of wet mud, scrape of scrambling over a cliff face or chill of water flowing over your feet. Like the healing potions and mystic concoctions you’ll brew, Song in the Smoke is a hell of drug.
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    • 60 Critic Score
    Sweet Surrender has a lot of room to grow. That much was made clear when Salmi Games promised extensive free updates at launch, but it’s also obvious when you stack it up next to the depth of other VR roguelites, with a comparatively light loot system and smaller overall dungeon size. But, despite its relative simplicity, the game’s moreish difficulty, enjoyable arcade gameplay and hypnotic visual and audio flair make for a rock-solid roguelite I was more than happy to lose hours within. This might be just the start of Sweet Surrender’s journey, but it’s a really promising one.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As gorgeous and well-intentioned as it may be, it’s tough to recommend Rhythm of the Universe: Ionia in its current form. There are moments of splendor in this opening act, but they’re far too fleeting and around a third of the incredibly short 45-minute runtime is spent watching its world instead of interacting with it. ROTU will have its work cut out for it in future episodes if this series is to bounce back from this underwhelming first installment but, for what it’s worth, we’re rooting for it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Overall, Clash of Chefs VR is a solid game and one that can provide plenty of entertainment, particularly in multiplayer, but it fails to do anything groundbreaking or extraordinary with the genre and it does have some niggling issues that need to be resolved. If you’re after Overcooked VR, we still say go with Cook-Out: A Sandwich Tale, but this is a decent addition to the genre all the same.
    • 83 Metascore
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    I Expect You To Die 2: The Spy And The Liar is a great puzzle game that falls just short of essential given that not all players are going to find a fit with its trial-and-error style of intentionally designed frustration. But this is bigger, better and more richly developed than its predecessor, with escape room-like puzzles that are an absolute joy to unlock one at a time. If you liked the first game, you’ll love the sequel and the added detail is a joy to behold. We can’t wait to see what Schell Games does with this franchise in the future.
    • 71 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Fracked is a blast to play, even if it isn’t quite the massive shooter epic to round out the PSVR era. By all means, its arena-based action is polished and thrilling, offering refined fast-paced action with intense combat setpieces. But the game’s simply over far too soon, never getting a chance to really expand on its core elements and deliver the rich experience its mechanics deserve. Fracked starts off at a sprint and never really lets up, but the finish line is far closer than it should have been.
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    Vengeful Rites is not a perfect game, but is a solid and engaging Action-Adventure RPG that is ideally suited for those who enjoy combat, exploration and puzzle-solving. Despite the lack of a deep narrative, there’s plenty of room for players to create their own story as they journey through the landscape.
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    Arashi: Castles Of Sin might not go down as VR’s answer to Tenchu, but it gets a lot right with its open-ended level design and its fantastic realization of Feudal Japan. It’s a rare VR game that gives you genuine choice in deciding how to get from A to B and, when it works, captures the slick elitism of becoming a ninja. But it’s let down by clumsier elements, like bugs, bad enemy AI and underwhelming sword combat. Even these dark forces combined aren’t enough to derail the fun sneaking at the core of the experience, but there’s plenty of room for Arashi to improve with a potential sequel.
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    There’s a great concept within Disc Ninja but ultimately, Immersion’s frisbee/golf concept doesn’t completely nail the landing. Offering enjoyable gameplay, a vibrant presentation and entertaining multiplayer, the game’s held back by the odd frustrating level, barebones content and a surprising lack of comfort settings. If you’re playing alone, Disc Ninja won’t last too long, but find some friends to join in and you’ll have a good time.
    • 71 Metascore
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    As it stands, Stride has a great foundation that doesn’t apply itself properly. A few tricky aspects aside, the game handles incredibly well, capturing the thrills, speed and exhaustion of parkour. But, while certainly addictive, the three modes on offer in the current Oculus Quest release don’t make the most of the mechanics, and feel like they’re in service to missing, larger modes. Those other options are on the way and we’ll take a look at Stride again once they’re here but, for now, Stride is a fun game with modes that can’t keep the pace going.
    • 66 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Winds & Leaves is an untroubling little VR game, both in the restorative nature of its farming mechanics and, ultimately, how simple and inoffensive it is. Soothing and wholesome, it’s a game about losing yourself in the satisfaction of honest work and clean living. But, even with the game’s angle of relaxation considered, it’s ultimately just a little too straightforward for its own good and some clunky elements end up holding it back. Winds & Leaves is a breezy remedy for a VR’s otherwise action-packed summer, but it’s only a temporary retreat.

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