• Network: Netflix
  • Series Premiere Date: May 11, 2020
Metascore
69

Generally favorable reviews - based on 6 Critic Reviews

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 6
  2. Negative: 0 out of 6

Critic Reviews

  1. Reviewed by: Richard Roeper
    May 8, 2020
    88
    Though “Trial by Media” is about some of the most widely covered, hot-button cases of the last half-century, the tone is somber, reflective and fact-based, heavy on archival footage and present-day interviews with individuals who were connected to the stories on one side of the camera or the other.
  2. Reviewed by: Nick Schager
    May 7, 2020
    80
    Trial by Media is consistently efficient, eloquent and free of formal gimmickry. Nonetheless, it stumbles slightly—in terms of its overarching goal—with its installment on Amadou Diallo, the unarmed African immigrant who in February 1999 was shot 41 times by four NYPD officers, if only because there’s a tenuous link between the media’s coverage of that incident and the not-guilty verdicts that were eventually handed down to the indicted. More coherent is the series’ critique of letting cameras into the courtroom.
  3. Reviewed by: Michael Phillips
    May 11, 2020
    75
    The new six-episode Netflix nonfiction anthology “Trial by Media” constitutes good, solid recappery in the realm of true crime and 50 shades of quality in the world of press coverage of high-profile legal sweepstakes.
  4. Reviewed by: Brian Tallerico
    May 11, 2020
    63
    At times unfocused, Netflix’s latest docuseries “Trial by Media” struggles to bring its six stories together under the same umbrella but contains enough insight to warrant a look and possibly spark conversation.
  5. Reviewed by: Ashlie D. Stevens
    May 12, 2020
    50
    What "Trial by Media" does exceptionally well is distill, in under an hour, the "big takeaways" from each episode. It's similar in format to Netflix's "Dirty Money." ... The series is missing an overarching synthesis about how or why viewers should reinterrogate their relationship with crime and court television, especially in the age of true crime.
  6. Reviewed by: Judy Berman
    May 7, 2020
    50
    At no point in the elegantly structured, deeply researched docuseries does the creators’ point of view come into focus. ... What’s missing is synthesis. Each episode tracks how attorneys, activists and other interested parties interact with the media. Sometimes, it’s illuminating. ... More often, causes and effects remain fuzzy. The series neither creates a timeline nor makes an overarching argument.

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