Alexis Gunderson

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For 41 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 80% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 13% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 13.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alexis Gunderson's Scores

Average review score: 83
Highest review score: 97 Winning Time: The Rise of the Lakers Dynasty: Season 1
Lowest review score: 45 Big Shot: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 39 out of 41
  2. Negative: 0 out of 41
41 tv reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 85 Alexis Gunderson
    Sure, there’s always a hard edge underlying these frothier elements—this is ex-L.A. Times crime reporter Michael Connelly’s Los Angeles, after all—but aesthetically, it’s those frothier bits in The Lincoln Lawyer that rise to the top. Given how dark the four central cases of the series’ first season are, this frothy aesthetic proves a nice counterbalance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 93 Alexis Gunderson
    The benefit of The Wilds treading so much of the same glittering narrative water this season as it did in the first is familiarity, one that gives viewers a rock-steady structure to hold onto as they work to make sense of what are (now that Leah’s in on at least some of Gretchen’s sociopathic secrets in the post-island timeline) even twistier games of cat-and-mouse. ... I’m telling you now: it’s magic.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Alexis Gunderson
    An economy of dialogue and a protraction of plot serve Outer Range well, as the mystery of the big spooky hole in the Abbotts’ west pasture isn’t the point of the series so much as its psychological fulcrum.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 97 Alexis Gunderson
    While Winning Time hasn’t invented the sports docudrama, I can’t see a future in which it doesn’t set a visual standard by which all sports docudramas (at least in the near term) will be compared.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 77 Alexis Gunderson
    Barnes-Cowan and Collins are just so arrestingly good, both together and apart, that they’re a treat to watch even when the story is dragging.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 83 Alexis Gunderson
    And yet, with the inevitable arrival of both the Civil War and Sue and Austin’s first baby, this third and final season of Dickinson nevertheless finds new ground to tread. Now, whether that ground is always emotionally consistent—well, that’s another question, entirely. ... That said, Emily herself continues this season to prove a constant wash of genius and heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 84 Alexis Gunderson
    If you’re going to watch Dalgliesh—and really, I hope you do—put down your phone. Put down your phone, turn your subtitles on, and let yourself fall under the spell of television that trusts you to actually watch.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 73 Alexis Gunderson
    It’s incredibly cheesy, but it is still fun.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 79 Alexis Gunderson
    Lee is a smart, charismatic actor, one for whom Doogie Kamealoha, M.D. is pretty much a perfect vehicle. If the rest of Season 1 delivers on the promise its first two episodes make, it could easily establish itself as a comforting favorite for years to come.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Alexis Gunderson
    Bad news: Brooklyn Nine-Nine is still a cop show. The good news is, though, whatever a single half-hour broadcast comedy could possibly do to chip away at America’s hero-cop mythology, Brooklyn Nine-Nine is, in this final season, committed to at least trying. ... These episodes are just as joke-dense and fun as their funniest pre-Season 8 episodes have been, everyone from the main cast down to the guest stars putting in their full 9-9%.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 81 Alexis Gunderson
    Patterson is so astonishingly good at channeling the specific energy, tics, and speech patterns McDowell spent Season 1 developing for David—as are Arlen Escarpeta as Adult JG (originated by Cayden K. Williams) and Erica Luttrell as Adult Marissa (originated by Lindsey Blackwell)—that I’m willing to be convinced. If you were a fan of David Makes Man when it first premiered, I hope you’re willing to be convinced, too.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 71 Alexis Gunderson
    The “cozy Scandi noir” mash-up is just weird, is my point, and not yet pulled off in a way that adds more to the story than it takes away.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 96 Alexis Gunderson
    Fictional Alan Menken Awards in play or not, the best television out there is only competing against itself, and HSMTMTS has not only set its own bar high, but worked damn hard to hit it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Alexis Gunderson
    Ultimately, where Cruel Summer will end up fitting in a teen drama-meets-psychological thriller landscape that includes everything from Pretty Little Liars to Élite will depend on how satisfyingly Kate and Jeanette’s story ends. For now, though, the show is playing on Expert Mode, and I can’t wait to see where it goes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 45 Alexis Gunderson
    What we get is a chaotic kind of emptiness. On the teen side, while the clutch of young actors who make up Westbrook’s basketball team are charming and do what they can with the scripts they’re given, what little insight we’re given into their respective characters is just deeply, deeply dull. As for what Korn’s story is meant to be, meanwhile (beyond an incomprehensible apologia for emotional abuse as “coaching” tactic, that is), I’m still not convinced even Big Shot knows for sure.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 94 Alexis Gunderson
    There’s a lot more going on in the second season of For All Mankind than the issue of guns on the moon, of course—as it did in its first season, the series continues to excel at balancing its sprawling ensemble of characters, all of whom are driven by a dizzying array of motivations, with the precise textural demands of a well-dressed period piece.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Alexis Gunderson
    The entire run of Season 2 finds every aspect of Emily’s untellable story thriving under Smith and Steinfeld’s vision. ... Season 2 gives [Hailee Steinfeld] even more to work with: namely, the question of fame, and whether or not it’s dangerous to seek it out; and also the question of love, and whether or not the world needs or deserves to know where your heart lives
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Alexis Gunderson
    For fans who want a bit more going on than a bunch of solo heroes working through their own long, dark teatimes of the soul, I can see it being a bit of a slog. That said, a bit of a slog, when it comes to The Expanse, is still a deeply satisfying, multisensory experience, and for all that the interpersonal stories are smaller this season, it is still as beautiful to look at as ever.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Alexis Gunderson
    It is so funny! Every joke lands, half of them in a field you had no idea was in play. And as far as delivery goes, there are no weak players.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Alexis Gunderson
    The show takes him seriously, which means their fictional version of the SAS takes him seriously, which means the deeply realistic bad guys out to literally kill him also take him seriously. And while that much seriousness has the tendency to drag lesser adult action series to an absolute standstill, the hyper-realistic teen antics Alex and his tiny circle of friends get up to, even in the midst of life-or-death situations, serve as useful tonal ballast that lends the series just enough warmth and humor to bolster the rest of the story’s inherent tension.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 87 Alexis Gunderson
    I can absolutely confirm: Season 3 of Star Trek: Discovery is poised to be the series’ best yet. ... It takes everything the first two seasons did best—namely, Michael and Saru’s hard-earned friendship; the deep commitment felt by everyone aboard the Discovery to both the ideals of the Federation and science; and Georgiou, just as a general agent of chaos—while dispensing entirely with all the baggage five decades of 23rd-century Star Trek storytelling that had originally weighed it down.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 71 Alexis Gunderson
    As solid as all of the lead performances are—Jean and A’zion being particular standouts, though they all more than hold their own—it never felt like there was enough of any one thing for me to grab onto.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Alexis Gunderson
    Mystery-wise, while it does succeed in luring out most of the original series’ core characters as they each try, in their own way, to help Lassiter find some peace, the central scheme is so convoluted that it took me two careful watch-throughs and multiple rewinds to make even shaky sense of its timeline and mechanics. ... And yet, it’s still Psych, and the alchemic reaction that happens when Steve Franks brings James Roday Rodriguez, Dulé Hill, Maggie Lawson, Corbin Bernsen, Kirsten Nelson and Timothy Omundsen together will always feel like something close to magic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 97 Alexis Gunderson
    This newest adaptation is a dream. Like its namesake, The Baby-Sitters Club (Netflix edition) is funny, sweet, and emotionally complex. ... The Baby-Sitters Club’s five young leads truly carry the series, grounding characters that could easily turn into broad types and making them each feel complicated and awkward and real.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 89 Alexis Gunderson
    Something deep? No, not really. But something fun, for sure. ... As for the choices, themselves, series creator Duane Caprizi and his team have managed to come up not just with the right balance, number-wise, but also the right balance in terms of each decision matrix’s ultimate narrative impact.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 87 Alexis Gunderson
    By starting with such a simple premise—Everyone deserves to have a name; everyone deserves to matter—and using richly textured but visually lean photography, Tucker and her team manage to pull it off. Of course, a major part of this team is the excellent cast.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 93 Alexis Gunderson
    High School Musical: The Musical: The Series is just damn fun to watch. It knows its earnestness can be very silly, and leans hard into taking loving shots at that earnestness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 91 Alexis Gunderson
    Dickinson is so fun and so strange and so tireless in handing out little moments of character development, with wildly original mood setting. ... With only three episodes provided for review and all of Emily’s real, long life such a legit mystery, it’s difficult to gauge what the central arc of the whole season might be. But with such gorgeous cinematography, costuming, and metatextual design, and with every actor putting in such fun, charming, deeply specific (read: often deeply odd) performances—and with Smith and Steinfeld, especially, so blazingly self-confident in their vision—it seems entirely likely that Dickinson will be one of the brightest debuts of 2019.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 79 Alexis Gunderson
    Demonstrate a high degree of un-self-seriousness and a keen sense of how to reinforce a tired narrative that does elevate the show beyond simple bloody silliness.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 82 Alexis Gunderson
    More of Liza’s world is fleshed out, meaning more time this season is also spent getting to know Harlow and Oliver (geniuses), and that the show itself becomes slightly more serialized. It does not mean that the first season’s I Love Lucy vibe is diminished, nor does it mean that there is less opportunity for surprising cameos.

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