David Ehrlich

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For 1,033 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Ehrlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Kubo and the Two Strings
Lowest review score: 0 Ratchet & Clank
Score distribution:
1033 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Despite — or perhaps because of — how evocative Reis’ performance can be, Catch the Fair One asks her to fill in too many of its blanks.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    This is a film about an artist who forgets herself, made by an artist trying to do the same, and with the help of an actress looking for an anchor of truth to hold onto right when the tides of stardom are threatening to pull her out to sea.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 16 David Ehrlich
    It’s rarely a good sign when a movie leaves you thinking: “The Renny Harlin who made ‘The Adventures of Ford Fairlane’ would never have stood for this lazy, mean-spirited crap.”
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    What this quaint little “Hot Fuzz” homage lacks in scale, it nearly makes up for with a stacked cast of delightful comic actors who all deliver the goods.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 David Ehrlich
    It may not be the best Pixar movie, or the riskiest — it sure as hell isn’t the most ambitious — but Luca is also one of the precious few that feels like it isn’t afraid to be something else.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 25 David Ehrlich
    A lukewarm soup of second-hand tropes that’s served in a portion too small to satisfy even the least discriminating thirst for slop, Infinite borrows so much from such obvious sources that it never bothers to establish an identity of its own.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    Terrible green screen, globs of digital blood, and record-scratch sound effects in place of actual jokes are only potholes along the road for a summer movie that knows what it is, and is slightly less afraid to embrace that than its previous iteration was.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    There’s no selling out here. No concessions to mainstream taste. On the contrary, The Real Thing might be the purest — if not the most concise — work yet from an emerging auteur who’s singularly compelled by the friction between public order and private chaos.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Caveat exists in a liminal space between genres, which is fitting for a film about the skeletons that might hide inside the walls of an old house. However, Mc Carthy’s mix-and-match approach reveals the story’s need for a more solid foundation.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 David Ehrlich
    While Earwig and the Witch is far from the ugliest film of its kind, there’s something uniquely perverse about seeing Ghibli’s signature aesthetic suffocated inside a plastic coffin and sapped of its brilliant soul; about seeing the studio’s lush green worlds replaced by lifeless backdrops, and its hyper-expressive character designs swapped out for cheap dolls so devoid of human emotion that even the little kids look Botoxed with an inch of their lives.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 16 David Ehrlich
    Pacino has made a lot of movies that feel like glorified tax shelters, but this is the first that appears to have actually been shot in one.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    The volatile friction between the movie’s wildly conflicting energies works as a curious backstop for this cautionary tale about not giving into grief and despair. No matter how grim things get (in life or in Ghost Lab), you never really know for sure what’s going to happen next.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 33 David Ehrlich
    An insufferable movie that wants to be profound and benign in equal measure.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    The result is a raw but straightforward detective yarn that feels nagged by the past rather than bedeviled by it, when even a pinch of the spectral uncertainty that Peter Weir found down the road in “Picnic at Hanging Rock” would have made it easier to appreciate why Aaron’s childhood wounds still feel so fresh.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 David Ehrlich
    So exuberant and full of life that it would probably convince you the movies were back even if they hadn’t gone anywhere, In the Heights is the kind of electrifying theatrical experience that people have been waxing nostalgic about ever since the pandemic began — the kind that it almost seemed like we might never get to enjoy again.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    Half-sketched as its drama can be, Alfred’s feature-length fiction debut is sustained by a complete lack of poser energy and a few new tweaks on some classic tricks; come for Vince Vaughn downshifting into his indie dad phase, stay for the woozy retro vibe that evokes a timeless sense of starry-eyed youth by layering mid-century Doo-wop from the likes of Arthur Lee Maye and The Chiffons over modern skate footage.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    Dream Horse hits its stride off the track, where the paint-by-numbers drama of winning and losing takes a backseat to a more nuanced tale about the need to get back in the race.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 David Ehrlich
    F9
    This is a movie that sling-shots so far past self-parody that it loops all the way back to something real.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 David Ehrlich
    What starts as the knotted stuff of violent coincidence soon unravels into something more bittersweet, as Mads Mikkelsen’s first movie after Oscar winner “Another Round” restitches itself into another giddy and unexpectedly poignant modern fable about the search for meaning in a world where everything happens by chance, but nothing is a coincidence.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Those Who Wish Me Dead might be missing the extra gear required to make it as much of a touchstone for contemporary audiences as the likes of “Executive Decision” or “The River Wild” are for anyone who was saw them in the ‘90s, but watching this kind of film claw its way onto screens at a time when it seems so outmoded is enough to make you happy that it hasn’t been completely killed off yet.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 58 David Ehrlich
    Less of a soft reboot than an emergency root canal for a series at risk of being removed from the release slate forever, this dogeared new chapter “from the Book of Saw” might lack the discipline to escape from the same traps that have always shackled its franchise to the grindhouse floor, but it still manages to squeeze a few drops of fresh milk out of Lionsgate’s oldest surviving cash cow with a back to basics approach and some unexpected political bite.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    In a film where several of the major story beats fall somewhere between far-fetched and Tolkien-level fantasy, it’s impossible not to appreciate the raw human texture that Haddish brings to her under-written role.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    Oxygen is the sort of sly exercise in cinematic anxiety that demands a certain suspension of disbelief, and earns just enough of it to entertain.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Heineman only falters in the same place that his subject often has: In knotting those disparate parts into a cohesive whole.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    The ultimate sin of Wrath of Man is that it doesn’t realize it’s really a story about pride.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    While there are some riches to be found under the surface for anyone who feels like watching this with a flow chart, Zhang is so clearly seduced by the spell of his own movie magic that everything else feels like an inadvertent side effect. He’s on his side, and he’ll forge whatever strategic alliances he needs to in order to stay there.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    Tran’s debut feature delivers a ton of charm for a kung fu throwback, and kicks a lot of ass for a broad comedy about some old guys relearning how to honor each other and fight for themselves.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    Anyone who’s hacked through enough “Demon Slayer” to keep pace with “Mugen Train” can surely handle what this movie has to offer. It’s the rest of us who might want to think twice.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    Berman and Pulcini’s movie feels as if it’s more haunted by unrealized potential than anything else.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 42 David Ehrlich
    Without Remorse doesn’t understand the role it’s meant to serve as the foundation of a potential franchise. It’s a movie locked in a tedious custody battle between legacy and potential, too safe to whet appetites for what’s to come while also too sequel-oriented to stand on its own two legs.

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