David Ehrlich

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For 864 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Ehrlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 In Transit
Lowest review score: 0 America: Imagine a World Without Her
Score distribution:
864 movie reviews
    • 18 Metascore
    • 16 David Ehrlich
    A braindead slog that shambles forward like the zombified husk of the heist movie it wants to be, The Last Days of American Crime is a death march of clichés that offers nothing to look at and even less to consider.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    For all of its low-key revisionism and post-modern flourish (most explicit during a kung-fu style training montage set to Leonard Cohen and a funny “Gladiator” reference that lands at a pivotal moment), Foulkes’ confident and kooky feature debut is less interested in subverting its source material than in continuing the puppet show’s long tradition of keeping with the times.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    Structured like a half-remembered pop tune and drifting by at a 75 minutes that feels as if it might not even be half that long, I Will Make You Mine is a sweet little bop about trying to find the rhythm of your life when you don’t really know how the song is structured. Find the melody and you’ll be humming it to yourself for days.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 David Ehrlich
    Casually cathartic at times, cathartically casual at others, this affecting little film about fathers and sons knows that some wounds never heal, but it’s never too late to stop the bleeding.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    The American Dream may be a mass delusion, but it’s the realest thing in the world to those under its sway. Zhuk was able to manifest her destiny and make it across the ocean, and her movie offers a compelling glimpse at why that may have been the only choice her country ever gave her.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 42 David Ehrlich
    Michael Showalter’s follow-up to “The Big Sick” is as flat and algorithmic as his last rom-com was poignant and alive. The only thing the two films really have in common is a winning performance from Kumail Nanjiani.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    While the laughs are still easy and frequent, this time around they feel more like the exception than the rule, and the final moments irrevocably tip the scales toward the unironic sobriety the series has been flirting with for so long (a replica of the Trojan horse comes to symbolize how this supposed romp sneaks past your defenses).
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 David Ehrlich
    This is powerful and uniquely disquieting cinema that should reward the curiosity of those brave enough to seek it out, but you can only stare into a bottomless abyss for so long before you lose the will to keep looking.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Even as Castle in the Ground begins to fray and fall apart, Joey Klein’s dour but gripping opioid drama remains believable for how perfectly it dovetails with its grieving protagonist.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 42 David Ehrlich
    Hardy’s grotesque performance doesn’t invite any sympathy for the devil, but it hobbles him in a way that renders Scarface human.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 David Ehrlich
    For a film that explores how the way that we’re looked at can inform how we see — a film capable of knotting the beautiful and toxic aspects of that process together in a way that makes room for them both — Clementine is too prone to navel-gazing to leave a strong impression.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    On a Magical Night is a fanciful tale of marriage and its malcontents; a muted sex farce that unfolds like an overwhelmingly French twist on “A Christmas Carol” for people who are sick of their spouses.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 42 David Ehrlich
    Like most bad trips, Cary’s documentary is ultimately harmless. And like most bad trips, you realize something’s gone wrong after just a few minutes, and then start to freak out that it’s never going to end.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    Spaceship Earth touches down as a grounded and even clinical analysis of our natural skepticism towards dreamers — of how our hope can sour into hostility as soon as it loses an iota of its shine.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 58 David Ehrlich
    There’s a fine line between resilience and false hope, and All Day and a Night walks it with purpose even when it’s tripping over itself.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    Always legible, sometimes reductive, but never condescending, Pemberton’s film offsets a lack of complexity with an abundance of clarity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 David Ehrlich
    It may not be a great zombie movie, but it’s a uniquely powerful reminder of why zombie movies are great.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    Shaggy and unformed as Pahokee often seems, the film — like its subjects, and the town where they live — is more than the sum of its parts.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 42 David Ehrlich
    Robert the Bruce seeks to explore the relationship between a ruler and their people, offering intimacy and personal concern as the best defense against a puppet government. Unlike its namesake, however, this cold and slapdash costume party of a film never figures out how to unite its many scattered parts.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    There’s a fine line between awe and tedium, and sometimes not even Chris Hemsworth is able to blur it for us.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    Eisenberg’s performance is left to affirm that art can truly happen anywhere, but when he’s offscreen it doesn’t seem to happen anywhere else.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia’s The Platform is not a subtle film. But these are unsubtle times, with unsubtle problems, and the most alarming thing about this grimly affecting Spanish allegory — which literalizes capitalism’s dehumanizing verticality with twice the gross-out terror of “Parasite,” and almost half of that masterpiece’s furious grace — is that it sometimes doesn’t seem like an allegory at all.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 42 David Ehrlich
    The power of the Camps’ story is hard to deny, but it would almost be impossible to make it seem more hollow.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 David Ehrlich
    Combining the droll self-satisfaction of a New Yorker cartoon with the wet gore of an Eli Roth movie, Zobel’s tense, well-crafted, and deviant grindhouse take on the national temperature has no trouble caricaturing what ails us, but even that fun combo lacks the killer instinct required to see us more clearly than we see each other.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 David Ehrlich
    A junky, paint-by-numbers crime saga that stacks up to The Town like Cats does to Singin’ in the Rain. It pains a lifelong New Yorker to say this, but Boston deserves better.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 David Ehrlich
    Borrowing from a dozen better movies as it tries to blur the line between a forgery and a masterpiece, Capotondi’s film manages to undercut its thesis with each new stroke.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    Apple's first narrative film is a breezy historical biopic that plays like BlackKklansman for math nerds, but it's too stodgy to add up.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 David Ehrlich
    Winning and losing are relative terms, but this is the first time in forever that Affleck feels like he’s got skin in the game.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 David Ehrlich
    As dour in practice as it is bright-eyed in principle, Potter’s film makes an earnest but enervating attempt to erase mental boundaries.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 David Ehrlich
    For all of Ferrara’s reckless abandon — and Dafoe’s unimpeachable commitment to artistic exploration — Siberia becomes increasingly unable to instigate our own journeys of the soul; seldom has the collective unconscious felt so inaccessible.

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