For 63 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dom Sinacola's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 91 Mandy
Lowest review score: 30 Home Sweet Home Alone
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 45 out of 63
  2. Negative: 3 out of 63
63 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 79 Dom Sinacola
    A legacy sequel that does nothing to revitalize its characters, expand its canon, extend (heh) its mythos, or even really tell a new joke. I laughed through the whole thing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Dom Sinacola
    Tippett purges his Id until he’s wrung the last bit of bile from the Assassin’s journey, but even throughout all the harrowing imagery, the director never loses a sense of cinematic wonder.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 59 Dom Sinacola
    White Elephant too often proceeds as dull and dreamy, an occasionally violent eulogy for a life of crime for which we have little context.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 82 Dom Sinacola
    Kosinski’s dogfights are pristine, incredible feats of filmmaking, economical and orbiting around recognizable space, but given to occasional, inexplicable shocks of pure chaos. Then quickly cohering again.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Dom Sinacola
    Though an ensemble of Angelenos fills out the film as it barrels to pretty much the only conclusion it could have, Ambulance is about as tidy as a Michael Bay film can get.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Dom Sinacola
    The context, however much of it there is, affects little, and the whole film begins to resemble a fetish object more than an adaptation. In a bad way.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Dom Sinacola
    Home Sweet Home Alone doesn’t bear any aesthetic beyond “existing.” It is obligatory when it needn’t be. It will undoubtedly get a sequel.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 87 Dom Sinacola
    Procession feels like the surest execution of Greene’s voice.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Dom Sinacola
    Against a lean genre construction, Cummings sputters and apologizes and screams at people and breaks things—vaping constantly—less a force of nature than a flesh-and-blood body half-failing to contain the whiny forces of nature within. His performance is a miracle of control and timing, focused by how little control Jordan has in his life, how poorly timed everything seems to be.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Dom Sinacola
    Ghostland is a movie and place borne from nuclear disaster, populated with the denizens of countless B-movies and the spectres of whiplash Hollywood careers.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 76 Dom Sinacola
    Like RaMell Ross’s Hale County This Morning, This Evening, Faya Dayi wanders lovely, liminal spaces between narrative and fairytale, between documentary film and something looser, something personally vérité.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Dom Sinacola
    Two lives connecting across the wasteland of modernity can be among the rarest and richest parts of our days on this planet. When Tsai makes those connections, all too briefly, it’s indelibly moving.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Dom Sinacola
    Ema
    Ostensibly, Ema revels in the pulling down of walls, insistent on stripping away the artifice of civility and systemic conservatism.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 87 Dom Sinacola
    As in all of Petzold’s films, Undine builds a world of liminal spaces—of lives in transition, always moving—of his characters shifting between realities, never quite sure where one ends and another begins.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 69 Dom Sinacola
    A sequel of rare sincerity, Bill & Ted Face the Music avoids feeling like a craven reviving of a hollowed-out IP or a cynical reboot, mostly because its ambition is the stuff of affection—for what the filmmakers are doing, made with sympathy for their audience and a genuine desire to explore these characters in a new context. Maybe that’s the despair talking. Or maybe it’s just the relief of for once confronting the past and finding that it’s aged considerably well.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Dom Sinacola
    It’s all pretty marvelous stuff, as much a well-oiled genre machine as it is a respite from big studio bloat, a flick more decidedly horror than any version before and yet another showcase for Elisabeth Moss’s herculean prowess.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Dom Sinacola
    Bad Boys for Life is better than it should be—the audience at my screening clapped when it ended—but not quite up to being what it must: a reminder that, you know what, a thousand years from now, Bad Boys will still fucking be here.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Dom Sinacola
    A marvel of so many confounding, disparate elements that somehow conspire to bring us from one side of the earth to the other. One would think the Safdies got lucky were we not wiser to their talent.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Dom Sinacola
    It doesn’t necessarily matter—nothing matters, really—but Dark Fate is so self-serious, so expositionally overwhelming, that its tendency to tell rather than show bleeds into its every aspect.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Dom Sinacola
    The sequel feels compromised, lumped with easy lessons about family and community, piecemeal and cobbled together from bigger ideas and the ever-nagging intuition that the sell-by date on the franchise has long expired.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Dom Sinacola
    Do not let anyone tell you that Joker captures our specific time, represents our specific society, both births and defines our specific zeitgeist, grabs ahold of our specific faces and breathes smoke down our throats. It doesn’t. Joker is, more than anything, fine. And we, more than anything, are not.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 66 Dom Sinacola
    Ready or Not revels in expectations—it’s a survival thriller, dark comedy, gross-out revenge splatterfest—but rarely exceeds them, treading well through each genre signifier, as suspenseful and funny and violent as any one of us could hope.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 69 Dom Sinacola
    Waugh’s action set pieces don’t surprise so much as operate with impressive efficiency
    • 60 Metascore
    • 56 Dom Sinacola
    Compared to the eight films preceding it, the mindlessness of Hobbs & Shaw isn’t a sign of humble poptimist genius, just of something less than what it could have been.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 87 Dom Sinacola
    Levant gives The Mountain context, structure, bones.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 81 Dom Sinacola
    Like a particularly bad trip, Midsommar bristles with the subcutaneous need to escape, with the dread that one is trapped. In this community in the middle of nowhere, in this strange culture, in this life, in your body and its existential pain: Aster imprisons us so that when the release comes, it’s as if one’s insides are emptying cataclysmically. In the moment, it’s an assault. It’s astounding.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 55 Dom Sinacola
    Dark Phoenix was always destined to fail. Limiting the sprawling story to one main arc severely debilitates the original’s emotional resonance, but avoiding Apocalypse’s swollen plot and stakes-less character narratives means reigning in an essentially big saga and cutting all of its awe down to some rote CGI. To make this work in one movie is to deny the essence of the source text.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 69 Dom Sinacola
    Juxtaposing human-sized drama against classic Toho iconography and one jaw-dropping silhouette after another, King of the Monsters is often more magnificently overwhelming than not.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 85 Dom Sinacola
    As video games and action movies parabolically draw closer and closer to one another, John Wick 3 may be the first of its kind to figure out how to keep that comparison from being a point of shame.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 84 Dom Sinacola
    It’s not always clear that Denis’ film is convincing enough to prove a point, or if any point it would prove is inevitably consumed by the nihilism at the core of its narrative. It simply exists, finds a moment of empathy now and then, is maybe pointless in the end. Like every one of us.

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