For 180 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Fink's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Amazing Grace
Lowest review score: 0 The Hustle
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 12 out of 180
180 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 John Fink
    She Dies Tomorrow is a bizarre and textured work of cinematic poetry, playing like a menacing death march into the unknown.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 John Fink
    It’s a repulsive punk rock work that falls short of achieving what it sets out to do, finding itself parodying work that’s already a parody of itself.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Invigorating in many passages, the drama offers a few twists on a fragmented mother-daughter relationship. If anything, the film announces the arrival of an indie filmmaker to watch for in the coming years.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Explicit and spontaneous, Aviva is a film with several brilliant moments that sometimes loses its way in overly indulgent sequences and set pieces as it dares to chronicle nearly every intimate encounter its characters and many of their friends have over the course of about 40 years. While overly ambitious, Yakin imagines the private life your lover had before you with a sociological lens.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 58 John Fink
    Instead of sinking in, I found myself yearning for the classics it has either been influenced by or is borrowing heavily from. If this were a more academic exercise it should have come with an extensive works cited page.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    I Will Make You Mine is a brisk and somewhat scrappy film at times rushing its third act and embracing its small-budget roots. While an abrupt climax leaves messy lives a little too neat and resolved, the film is a fitting and sweet third chapter in the Surrogate Valentine series.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 John Fink
    Fans may find it less than comprehensive in the later years of their history following Hello Nasty, but there perhaps is only so much one can do in this forum and the film largely succeeds at encapsulating their camaraderie and spirit.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 John Fink
    A horror film populated by smart characters that take on the patriarchy by refusing to play by its rules, its anger and its heart is in the right place. The problem is how it achieves these ends with plot devices that feel borrowed from cheap studio cash grabs usually dumped in theaters in January and September.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 John Fink
    The Up series feels like the last of its kind and should be treasured as such.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 John Fink
    It demystifies an important part of movie magic with a diverse group of veterans of the craft, many who got their start as an apprentice for the best in the industry.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    The Disappearance of My Mother is a bit too rough around the edges, but it’s as honest as it is persistent.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 John Fink
    Raise Hell: The Life & Times of Molly Ivins is a funny portrait of a quick-witted satirist who called it as it was, unafraid to be a little mean to the narcissists who were just glad to see their name in print.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 John Fink
    The film, although likable in passages, keeps the problems it explores local, with a narrow focus rather than creating a national call to action.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 John Fink
    Despite a few laughs, it’s a film that panders to a general audience with the funky musical score of a blaxploitation flick but none of the heart, spirit, or outrage.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    The Feeling of Being Watched is an illuminating documentary told through an engaging first-person perspective through the eyes of someone who as a kid may have not seen the entire picture – and as an adult is now starting to put it together before our very eyes.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 John Fink
    Nothing Stays The Same is an important piece of Austin history with great performances but it feels as though director John Sandmann respectfully stuck to too narrow a mandate.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 John Fink
    Yesterday, a sweet and well-meaning comedy, is a cautionary tale in taking on such an iconic musical output without adding much new to it.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 0 John Fink
    Like Holmes & Watson proved late last year, two comedic giants is just not enough to save terrible material that should have been fixed long before the film went into production.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 58 John Fink
    Upon a first glance, the film is somewhat hollow an experience, offering trite dialogue and an on-the-nose message about beauty and the horrors of genetic engineering taken to their extreme.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    A surprisingly fun comedy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 John Fink
    Framing John DeLorean suffers from functioning as two potentially entertaining films in one, fighting it out on screen.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 John Fink
    Run
    Run hits familiar beats and is often too guarded, leaving us grasping for a little more than its 78-minute run time can provide.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Despite its spunky tone, Ask Dr. Ruth feels like several documentaries in one rather than a comprehensive look at a fascinating and enduring woman who shows no signs of slowing down. Thankfully, the film never feels as if it’s a work of branded content but rather an honest and intimate portrait of a revolutionary American cultural icon.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 John Fink
    The joy of Ferrara’s The Projectionist is simply in getting to know its subject.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 John Fink
    Krauss packs a lot into what could be read as a prequel for his documentary, creating a brutal war on terror picture with a timely context.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 33 John Fink
    Beautifully shot in Instagram-filter inspired hues by Tom Betterton and Adam Silver, After is occasionally aesthetically pleasing. Yet the talented cast is burdened by a dead on arrival screenplay that waters down what could have been an intoxicating tale of first love had it divorced itself from its dull formula that no doubt was influenced by committee and the studio’s desire to create what they think teen and tween audiences will enjoy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 John Fink
    While it aims to generate outrage it does so rather quietly (unlike the recent blunt satirical work of Adam McKay) with a predictable outcome as all rigged games do. The process of getting to that point feels terribly uneven; at times a bit over the top in passages and yet restrained in others as certain transactions are treated as just the cost of doing business in The War on Terror.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 John Fink
    The film progresses predictably with an easy charm even if it’s dragged down by occasionally clunky pacing and sitcom tropes while exploring the complexity and flaws of its characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Imperfect, but delightful for much of its journey, Come As You Are packages an important human rights message in a comedy for the bros.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 John Fink
    The supernatural element with low-rent visual effects derails an interesting enough concept where the rules don’t matter. Finding a creepy, mysterious porn film is weird by itself, and while it need not be grounded in realism like 8mm or Hardcore, Porno doesn’t have to throw away the rule book to be fun and scary.

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