For 228 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Fink's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Amazing Grace
Lowest review score: 0 The Hustle
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 13 out of 228
228 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Directors Ha and Yi craft a compelling and moving tribute to a man who was by no means a perfect person but nevertheless had a remarkable impact on breaking barriers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Vengeance is a refreshing, self-aware take on a man who sets out to define a societal problem and is met with evolving redefinition.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 John Fink
    Perhaps The Black Phone should have pushed its premise a bit more, building real stakes and real thrills in a deeper analysis of its archetypes. If performances by Thames, McGraw, and Hawke are strong, there could stand to be a few more twists and a bit more character development to transcend what is a middle-of-the-road psychological thriller.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    It’s a hard picture to dislike. The Belchers are such a purposefully weird and inclusive group; even if you haven’t seen the show you’ll feel right at home after a few minutes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 John Fink
    What initially starts as a light-hearted look at YouTube star David Dobrik and his “Vlog Squad” evolves into a portrait that doesn’t quite know what to make of him and his enablers.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 John Fink
    Anonymous Club’s power is in its meditative nature, reflecting on the intersection of celebrity and creativity.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    While perhaps a bit too neat in terms of its plot and resolution, the film is an unflinching portrait and powerful character study that hinges upon Andrea Riseborough’s nuanced performance.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    A documentary that is “authorized” by his estate––which perhaps gives mother Bernard a platform to right his wrongs––the picture smartly never takes the middle ground, but rather provides a kaleidoscopic portrait informed by those that knew him well—family, business partners, mentors, contemporaries.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    What is most fascinating about Walker’s feature is the intoxicating rhythm it concocts while taking certain narrative liberties as both Kris and Naomi, holding a shared history with secrets, find themselves within a certain comfort zone.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    To say Soft & Quiet is designed to get your blood boiling is an understatement—it makes its intentions very clear when a pie for the meeting is unwrapped, revealing a swastika.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 John Fink
    The film’s final revelations are underdeveloped and underwhelming, wrapping up events neatly in a way that lacked the humor of earlier scenes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    I Love My Dad is as funny as it is mortifying, with Oswalt as a kind of sociopathic Cyrano de Bergerac justifying his behavior in the name of becoming closer to his son.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 John Fink
    The film may be Linklater’s warmest and most nostalgic precisely because of its specifics.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 John Fink
    Like Cage, it’s a curious creation, one that never quite matches the ambitions of the man of the hour, but does allow him to poke fun at himself and treat fans to something cathartically silly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 John Fink
    It’s a film that gleefully, hilariously subverts expectations at every corner, borrowing à la music videos from pop culture, experimental film, and any corner of the universe it finds inspiration in.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    The film is an open, honest portrait of personal conflict, contradictions, and suppressed narratives that shed some new light on the student protest movement by bringing the footage—and some of the personal baggage—out of the vault.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 John Fink
    The geopolitical stakes are immense and Navalny is essential viewing, especially for any Western audience that may have not been following this story so closely.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Perkins’ approach, however, could be read more as an exercise in media study than biopic of Diana. It adds to the canon but not the lure of the mythical “People’s Princess.”
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 John Fink
    Having two terrific stars front and center isn’t nearly enough when they’re only given permission to run wild in this small of a playground.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 John Fink
    It’s frustrating when a film provides us with an original character and an engaging first act while following so predictably in the shoes of other home invasion and defense thrillers.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 John Fink
    A film such as this lives and dies by its leads, and both are wonderful on-screen together, creating a realistic love story that works well as they navigate the situation they both find themselves in.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Well-constructed if not repetitive in certain passages, Lady Buds is an engaging and comprehensive look at the many dimensions of legalization, striking a friendly, conversational tone as it provides a deep dive into the supply chain, marketing, distribution and ultimately the bind the industry finds itself in as the drug is still considered at a federal level a controlled substance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Capturing the rhythms of life on a rural Humble County, California commune in a changing cultural landscape, Kate McLean and Mario Furloni’s beautifully crafted Freeland is a restrained, nuanced drama centered around a quietly thrilling performance by Krisha Fairchild.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Director Bill Benz (best known for episodes of Portlandia), Clark, and Brownstein have a good deal of fun playing the business side of show business—the documentary filmmaker trying to find a unique angle between concert footage, or the star having to take mundane questions from the press in each city she visits on tour. It both documents an identify crisis and doesn’t.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 John Fink
    499
    499 is often as riveting as it is stunning to consume: a spiritual journey punctuated with inhumane acts of violence intertwined with a certain national identity. Reyes offers an ambitious and unflinching portrait of contemporary Mexico that provides a vague answer regarding the endgame of the violence in the country.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Although masterfully directed and performed, the film somehow feels a bit unresolved, especially since the family lives in a populated suburb rather than a rural area which would make their desperate actions far easier to conceal.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Moreh’s approach creates a surprisingly comprehensive, if (by design) one-sided, American-centric view of the peace process. Interviews and archival materials have a means of immersing us in the backroom discussion.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 John Fink
    Here is the rare kind of often sweet college comedy with good-natured laughs that captures a side of the process rarely seen in frat comedies: the divide between those in the service industry and those that have the luxury to party eight days a week.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 John Fink
    The film problematically never quite commits to being one thing: bouncing around the investigation, being work of advocacy, and a study of family violence. In doing so, it lacks the kind of emotional impact and outrage it ought to have.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 John Fink
    The Hunt for Planet B is an evocative documentary.

Top Trailers