Joseph Jon Lanthier

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For 81 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joseph Jon Lanthier's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Black Narcissus
Lowest review score: 25 How to Start a Revolution
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 57 out of 81
  2. Negative: 7 out of 81
81 movie reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    8½ works best as a self-deprecating comedy, a fact revealed most forcefully in the folly of film production on display.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    The film's beguiling visual poetry and smatterings of sociological subtext function less than coherently as transitional markers between cinematic epochs, or even as the nascent burblings of any imminent DIY revolution; instead, they're redolent of a modernist apotheosis.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Despite all this macabre torment, It's Such a Beautiful Day involves a lot of sweet, plucky humor that represents a discreet softening of the angry sarcasm for which Hertzfeldt has become known.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    America exploded in the ’60s; Two-Lane Blacktop is the post-apocalyptic road trip.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 63 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Garfield’s likably unlikable protagonist provides Force of Evil with a semblance of cohesiveness, even if the film often feels like the product of dueling fetishes and pet symbols.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    The film is a conversation between two disadvantaged artists with indelible personalities, both of whom are unabashedly manipulating their way into at least the esoteric side of the everlasting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    This piquant control over cinematic grammar doesn’t quite rescue the film from a laughably zombie-tinged climax and an anomalous deus ex machina denouement, but it makes The Magician one of Bergman’s more accessible failures, and collapses any suspicious connection between him and the fretful Vogler.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Black Narcissus impishly keeps watch over the Archers’ canon with a sunken, rabidly prismatic eye.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 88 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    It lulls us into its reckless passivity to the point that even the comedic duds possess a languid hint of funny.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Michel Ocelot's recent cartoons cleverly advance Lotte Reiniger's prototypical stop-motion technique into the digital age.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    The Pulitzer-winning playwright’s movies are often a few steps ahead of their audiences, but Homicide seems to have intuitively anticipated its now-exemplary status.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    The fact that people don’t talk like this in real life isn’t a flaw in the film: It’s a tragic social deficiency.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Accusation is the rhetoric of outrage, and Arnon Goldfinger can't bring himself to experience even conservative anger, regardless of its appropriateness.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Shirley Clarke's portraiture eschews cohesive biography and often spirals off into lyrical dissonance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Mystery Train is a singularly enthusiastic American anthem that trenchantly interprets the cult of audiophilia as filthy gas stoves roasting marshmallows, raspy radio DJs hawking fried calamari, and ill-equipped racial armies ignorantly clashing by night.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Ross McElwee is less anxious of death itself than of finally comprehending the vast faultiness of the life he's lived.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Though relentlessly and admirably logical, the movie constantly glosses over the buried human element.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Paris, Texas may be missing a crucial piece of authentic Americana, but it still evokes an America most Americans yearn to gaze on. An America as thorny and carnivorous as a hawk talon, as raw and smug as a downtown mural, and as sweetly enigmatic as a vacant lot that doesn’t—that can’t—exist.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Its meta-cinematic "think piece"-ness is redeemed by the slinky symmetries drawn between Massadian's own auteur-ship and the protagonist's narrative role.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Writer-director Dan Sallitt's fourth feature moves with confident boldness from the incestuous gauntlet its prologue impishly hurls down.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Divorcing New Orleans from its stereotypes (there’s no ham-fisted Creole dialogue, no digs at the indigenous cuisine), the filmmaker imagines the boiling, boggy city as a purgatory for lost souls, spotted with cinephiliac mold.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Cul-de-Sac remains a searing reminder that Roman Polanski’s idiosyncratic grasp of the human mind was once evinced theatrically, rather than through narrative ferocity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    By examining the relationship between Samson and Delilah through the wrong end of the telescope, Thorton soaks in the arid, unaccommodating surroundings with occasionally oxymoronic lucidity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    Its looseness adequately portrays Plimpton as an inwardly conflicted figure, but it fails to make much of a case for his legacy outside of The Paris Review's still-noticeable brand.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    The faces of the culture - a group of nomadic Tibetans who raise yak and harvest caterpillar dung from ramshackle tents in the Chinese mountains - resist all but the most vague of ecological or political calls-to-action.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 38 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    A maddeningly blunt and syrupy rendering of a piquant socio-economic configuration, Park Bong-Nam's Iron Crows is ultimately third-world documentary filmmaking at its most exploitatively surface-groping.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    A uniquely passive reminder of the dangers of showering exotic creatures with anthropomorphic affection.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    The testimony we hear from suspects' neighbors and similarly curious media underlings feels muted, like a halfhearted repetition.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Joseph Jon Lanthier
    The film ends on a note of courage, and a call-to-action that we "remember," naturally, but we can't completely buy it: What Freidrichs has accomplished is a portrait of unknowability.

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