For 98 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jude Dry's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 End of the Century
Lowest review score: 0 A Dog's Purpose
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 63 out of 98
  2. Negative: 12 out of 98
98 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    An entertaining and informative new documentary, Denise Ho: Becoming the Song, reveals the singer’s motivation and personal sacrifices while also offering a vital survey of Hong Kong history and the fight for independence.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    Perhaps what is most radical about Disclosure is the wide array of trans spirits both onscreen and off. In making the film, Feder and Cox are rewriting the very history they set out to tell, adding one more title to “positive representation” list. That alone is worth coming out for.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Jude Dry
    It’s an ambitious piece, but in the dance between experimental ideas and grounded storytelling, Aviva should have listened to her body.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Jude Dry
    It is a stirring call to action, and an urgent warning to those who place religion above their child’s survival. Most importantly, however, the film does not judge or speak down to those who most need to hear its message.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    While the plot is not overly complex, Lucky Grandma benefits from a compelling array of supplementary characters.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    With director Elizabeth Carroll as skilled sous-chef, Diana Kennedy: Nothing Fancy brings bold flavors together to serve a scrumptious delight of a film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Jude Dry
    It’s a shame that You Don’t Nomi, a new documentary about the failure and reevaluation of Paul Verhoeven’s 1995 pulp film “Showgirls,” doesn’t live up to its truly inspired title.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    A Secret Love is full of the kind of gentle ribbing and loving chuckles one would expect from any adorable old couple, but it’s made all the more poignant by the fact of Pat and Terry’s trailblazing personal histories.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    The Half of It has lofty aims for its version of the classic tale — which it mostly achieves, albeit without much fanfare.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Jude Dry
    Abe
    With a more streamlined script, or even fewer characters and more developed relationships, Abe could have made a real impact. As it stands, there are too many cooks in the kitchen.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Jude Dry
    Karen’s dogged pragmatism, and her complex relationship to the smut that provided her family’s livelihood for thirty years, is why Circus of Books is such a rare delight — and a nearly perfect documentary.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Jude Dry
    There’s Something in the Water doesn’t break any molds in terms of documentary form, and it’s less impressive as cinema than activism. But it’s easily digestible and well researched, with the aid of Waldron’s book.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    Hart guides the actions with a sensitive and joyous hand, luxuriating in the palette of Arizona’s arid desert and gaping badlands.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Jude Dry
    Straight Up is meticulous in building its hyper-stylized aesthetic, but doesn’t have much to say about the human condition.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    In Minyan, the arresting and evocative feature film debut from documentary filmmaker Eric Steel, the search for answers turns up far more riches than any half-baked conclusion ever could.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 33 Jude Dry
    "Saw" writer Leigh Whannell mixes metaphors in this limp remake, using gaslighting and privacy fears for his uneven sci-fi horror.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Jude Dry
    It’s one of the year’s best gay films.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    Welcome to Chechnya is a vital and urgent portrait of an unprecedented humanitarian crisis, and the world needs to hear about it.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    The Turning announces Sigismondi as a bold and adept genre filmmaker, with an eye for detail and impeccable casting choices.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 33 Jude Dry
    Like a Boss may preach friendship above all else, but sitting through it together would test even the strongest of ties.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Jude Dry
    Using the hyper-gendered spaces of college Greek life as a fertile palette, Takal and her co-writer April Wolfe skewer toxic masculinity, the white male literary canon, rape culture, patriarchy, and white male rage — all wrapped up with a bow in the stylishly entertaining package of a studio-backed holiday horror.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 42 Jude Dry
    With muted characters and a conventional structure, the movie struggles to find the fun or the spirit, humming between high notes and low notes to fall flat in the middle. While its heart is in the right place, Gay Chorus Deep South just doesn’t sing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    The burden of familial obligation permeates Ms. Purple — who carries it and who passes it off, who outruns it and who lets it overrun them. It’s a ripe topic Chon clearly feels deeply, rendered in beautiful cinematography and delicate storytelling. It’s also a uniquely Asian-American story, rooted in loving specificity and beating with a universally human heart.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Jude Dry
    Like its heroine, Official Secrets is shouting into an echo chamber.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jude Dry
    Like a great poem, End of the Century gives voice to a seemingly indescribable feeling, one anyone who’s ever fallen in love will recognize from deep in their soul — as if bumping into an old friend you forgot how much you liked.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 33 Jude Dry
    Without the star power of Mandy Moore and the relative sophistication of the single location predicament, 47 Meters Down: Uncaged is just the last gasp of a shark saga that didn’t need to come up for air.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Jude Dry
    The film has style in spades; it would have substance, too, if only it knew when to quit.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    Consequences thrums with a vibrant current — propelled by a dizzying churn of cigarettes, cocaine, fistfights, and shirtless young men — until arriving at its predictably explosive conclusion. The film’s perspective may be austere, but its heart is defiantly exuberant.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jude Dry
    Ma
    The suspense builds creepily enough, with a classic fake-out in a strong first act. But when the movie turns into full-blown horror, which it eventually sort of does, the pacing of the violence is all out of whack.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    The film is itself a provocation; a fascinating document of a years-long conceptual project as well as the final (or next) piece of the complicated puzzle.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Jude Dry
    The sequel remains charming, beautifully animated, and often incredibly funny, but there’s a sense that writer Brian Lynch realized Max’s story needed a lot more padding this time around.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    While great direction isn’t the worst problem to have, the fact that the writing and acting couldn’t quite live up to their gorgeous surroundings hollows the experience of watching it.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Jude Dry
    If this is the best Hollywood can offer these women, it’s not their fault for wanting to work. Instead, it’s on writers and studios to stop treating seniors like some sort of oddities to squeeze a few laughs out of before they croak.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    This gory teen comedy blends laughably outrageous carnage with a legitimately scary plot to delightful ends. Throw in a winking fetish for cinephile culture and audiences are sure to go wild for the gutsy film.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 33 Jude Dry
    Rather than going out with a bang, however, the final installment in the franchise hinges its loose plot around the marital infidelities of younger, humorless characters so thinly sketched that it is impossible to care about them.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Jude Dry
    In making Water Makes Us Wet, the filmmakers have embarked upon the noble pursuit of moving people to care about climate change as if their lives — and their sex lives — depended on it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 67 Jude Dry
    Without a singular galvanizing conflict to focus the plot, Driveways feels more like a collection of character studies than a cohesive whole.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Jude Dry
    With every note as predictable as the next, the movie just blends into a discordant mess. Even Rodriguez’s smile can’t salvage this disappointing remake, but at least it provides a welcome reminder to check out the movie that inspired it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Jude Dry
    The genius of the first movie was its ability to disguise a searing critique of capitalism inside a hilarious package, an idea that is genuinely funny itself. The sequel, with its recycled jokes and re-mixed songs, is merely a reminder of how original the original actually was.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 58 Jude Dry
    The big reveal at the end of the second act is absurd enough to pump some adrenaline into the third act, but the movie drags on too long afterwards.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    The austere minimalism of Rust Creek works to the movie’s advantage.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    Sweet’s work is a time capsule of a bygone era, preserved in glorious, saturated technicolor. He was the master of the unexpected composition, and in that sense, The Last Resort is a fitting tribute.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Jude Dry
    For a movie with so much going on, (not even counting the CGI cougar Bella befriends), A Dog’s Way Home is wildly devoid of meaning or humor.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jude Dry
    Smallfoot really flounders with its obligatory message-mongering: a hodgepodge of didacticism about the importance of celebrating differences, asking questions, never fearing the unknown, or judging someone because they look different. Plenty of sound lessons in there, to be sure, but without a singular focus, they all blend into one.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    Like a grand opera, Bel Canto weaves many stories into one sweeping epic.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    Quincy is refreshingly devoid of talking-head interviews, relying instead on the measured ruminations of the man himself and the extensive archives Jones and Hicks had the difficult job of paring down. The result is a jaunty stroll through the last half-century of music history, and a fitting tribute to a living legend.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 58 Jude Dry
    The new action flick Peppermint is a rare return to form for Garner, who doles out her vigilante justice with effortless charm. Unfortunately, that’s about the only reason to see Peppermint.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    The real strength of Sierra Burgess Is a Loser is the steely determination and sharp intellect of Sierra herself, for which Purser must be given most of the credit.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    Kin
    There are plenty of plot devices to keep the audience on its toes, and Reynor is the epitome of a 21st century lovable antihero, so fashionable these days. He’s hard and grizzled when needed, but soft and playful as well.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Jude Dry
    The polished new documentary, McQueen, charts the late designer’s rise from English country boy to fashion’s enfant terrible, but the filmmaking lacks the artistic vision of its subject.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jude Dry
    By all rights, it should be a heartwarming comedy with a few more tender moments. Instead, Hearts Beat Loud operates like a sad drama with a few moments that might make you smile. We knew punk was dead, but the comedy doesn’t have to be.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Jude Dry
    As the tension builds to its harrowing conclusion, and Alex begins to bare his teeth, Mathews pulls enough tricks from his sleeve to make Discreet a worthy digression.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 91 Jude Dry
    If the deliciously grainy archival footage were the only thing That Summer had to offer, it would be enough. But by including Beard and Radziwill’s introspective voiceovers, Swedish director Göran Hugo Olsson (“The Black Power Mixtape”) creates a nostalgic meditation that touches on both cultural and historical memory.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    Beast walks the line between taut psychological thriller and doomed genre romance, smartly remaining laser-focused on Moll and her fraying sanity.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 42 Jude Dry
    Once more for the people in the back, treating anyone’s identity like a costume is offensive and dangerous to an already-marginalized group. If the filmmakers wanted the movie to have a real impact, they should have cast a transgender actress. Instead, Anything is just a yellow lily-livered mess.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 42 Jude Dry
    Life of the Party is proof that even the funniest actors need good material, which makes it all the more disappointing that McCarthy wrote the script with director Ben Falcone, who is also her husband.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Jude Dry
    Theater lovers will enjoy seeing these actors take on such iconic roles, but they’ll find themselves wishing they were seeing the same great talent on the stage.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    Landing somewhere between “Love, Simon” and “Superbad,” Alex Strangelove is a strange delight indeed.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Jude Dry
    It’s a wild romp with all the campy noir you might expect in a film by the father of queercore.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Jude Dry
    Molly Shannon is brilliant and warm as the literary icon.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    Writer-director Yen Tan renders Adrian’s world with understated intensity; each frame feels so precise, as if the scenery is holding its breath along with Adrian. Every silence, every space left open, echoes the liminal moments between what the characters say and what they mean.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Jude Dry
    It’s too bad that the movie isn’t as vibrant, funny, and entertaining as the community it wishes to represent — but it’s a start.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 42 Jude Dry
    Save for a few clever twists and winning performances from O’Shea Jackson Jr. and 50 Cent (née Curtis Jackson), Den of Thieves is the kind of bloated crime thriller that could have been made in any decade — which is not to call it timeless so much as way past its time.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 91 Jude Dry
    Tightly written and sensitively rendered, the devastating film is propelled by masterful performances, led by a bewitching Wood in the role she was born to play.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    Even as Quest toys with expectations, (there are no chart toppers to be found here), the triumphs in Quest are much harder to spot, though they are mighty; love, family, and hope in the face of adversity. Nothing could be more harmonious.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Jude Dry
    Princess Cyd is a triumphant little film — little in the detailed moments it creates, not the content of its character. Anchored by complicated, smart, funny women, Princess Cyd is a rare delight of a film and a model for others to follow.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Jude Dry
    One of Us offers a rare window into a highly insular community that is often misunderstood, or tacitly sanctioned for fear of stoking anti-semitism.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 25 Jude Dry
    Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween would be tone deaf, lacking in plot, and almost entirely humorless in any year. That is happens to arrive in theaters amid a cascade of sexual assault survivors sharing their stories about sexual assault doesn’t help its case.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    Ruspoli’s presence in the film elevates Monogamish beyond the predictable talking heads documentary.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 33 Jude Dry
    The movie is weighed down by too many secondary characters, which only serve to dissipate their flickering charms. No one in the film, even our heroine, gets more than a hint of backstory as the single-minded plot careens toward its predictable conclusion.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    We’ve yet to see if Kate McKinnon can lead a movie, but she sure as hell can steal one. She did it in “Ghostbusters,” and she did it again in Rough Night, which is surprisingly funny despite a wild premise riddled with potential pitfalls.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    The film is visually breathtaking, and anchored by two strong performances. But the loyalties in My Cousin Rachel seesaw too dramatically for tension to build satisfyingly; the film runs hot and cold when it really wants to simmer.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 67 Jude Dry
    Baywatch won’t blow anything out of the water (except for the boat it sets on fire), but it will certainly make a splash.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Jude Dry
    It may not break the mold in many ways but one, but the impact of that one is far from trivial.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    Like a fine conversation, which her solid script mostly delivers, Coppola keeps the tension in the air like a lightly bouncing ball.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 42 Jude Dry
    It’s a fittingly ambiguous title for a directionless film, late night fare that will be enjoyed by just as many horny men as horny teenage lesbians.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    The film’s main triumph is in crafting a convincing narrative with a clear point of view.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Jude Dry
    Freeland is clearly having fun behind the camera, but broad and superficial performances mean the fun doesn’t always translate.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    Raw
    Ducournau tears down the walls of a genre so often identified with male filmmakers. (Like the father of body horror, David Cronenberg.) Shrewdly using the art-horror format to upend the traditional teen Bildungsroman, “Raw” makes it impossible to look away — as much as you might want to.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jude Dry
    Aside from the thrill of its lavish sets and costumes, there isn’t much new to offer in this Beauty and the Beast.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Jude Dry
    McMurray fixates too much on the brutality of his subject, foregoing any meaningful character development. The result is a film about punishment that is quite punishing to watch.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    A testament to the power of community to heal the deepest wounds, My Life As A Zucchini takes on heavy subject matter with a light hand, and comes up with a delightful tale that is equal parts wrenching and uplifting.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 42 Jude Dry
    Franco clearly enjoys playing the idealistic rabble rouser, and who wouldn’t want to direct a movie so they could cast themselves as a charismatic radical? Unfortunately, watching someone else play make believe is only fun if you believe it yourself.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jude Dry
    Gigi is an invaluable role model to young trans people in her ferocious courage and undeniable fabulousness, but the film is little more than a celebration of that.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Jude Dry
    There will be many people who see themselves in the furtive glances and mud-covered kisses from which God’s Own Country weaves its harsh but hopeful narrative, and they will do so while witnessing a finely crafted piece of cinema.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    The dancing alone is worth the price of admission, and Naharin is a dynamic if somewhat aloof subject.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Jude Dry
    Raw and unadorned, Whose Streets? is a documentary in the truest sense of the word; an actual moving document of events fresh in the country’s memory, but never before laid as bare as they are here.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jude Dry
    Trophy tells a story as captivating as its images are beautiful.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 0 Jude Dry
    What is the meaning of life? Are we here for a reason? Is there a point to any of this? We may never know, but knowing this movie exists may bring some viewers one step closer to giving up on the whole damn thing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 42 Jude Dry
    As a director, Harrelson seems to be grasping at elements of far better movies. The live component, while impressively executed, rarely alters the movie in any meaningful way.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Jude Dry
    Even in the weak signal that is the January movie season, xXx: The Return of Xander Cage hardly registers.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    Led by a few strong performances, and delivering plenty of heart-clutching moments, The Bye Bye Man is sure to appeal to horror lovers of all stripes.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 25 Jude Dry
    With the bizarre way Whit and his crew talk about numbers and money, Collateral Beauty is just another story about spoiled rich people.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jude Dry
    “Best Worst Thing” is more than a story about a Broadway show; its most poignant moments examine the thrill of dreams coming true, and the inevitable come down afterwards.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    The most surprising thing about Keeping Up with the Joneses isn’t that it’s actually funny, but that some touching unlikely friendships emerge amidst the outrageous action sequences.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Jude Dry
    Check It is a powerful and electrifying film, full of characters who exude wisdom, authenticity, and bravado. Their lives beg telling, but this is only half the story.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    The 1971 epic offers a stylish and scathing parable about the dangerous ways that the powerful can exploit religious zeal to stay that way.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Jude Dry
    In Anthony and Alex’s capable hands, the Susanne Bartsch legacy endures just as brightly as it began.

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