For 61 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lucy Mangan's Scores

Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 This Way Up: Season 1
Lowest review score: 20 Dolly Parton's Heartstrings: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 34 out of 61
  2. Negative: 2 out of 61
61 tv reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The details pile up, but intrigue fails to mount.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Messiah is potent stuff packed with fine performances.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Although it registers friendships and fallings-out, it does not make them into soapy storylines. It prefers, equally refreshingly, to dig deep into the many qualities that must combine to make a single performer, and then how they must coalesce into one team.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    It’s a bloodstained love letter to a classic, beautifully and delicately scented with just the faintest hint of ham gothic yarns need; a homage to all the great Counts who have gone before, but still entirely its own thing. And again, like the best of Gatiss and Moffat’s Sherlocks, with the searching intelligence that promises to flesh out the foundational story. Enjoy sinking your teeth into it all.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    [A] rich, clever, funny and courageous adaptation.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    There is plenty of action, for those who want it, but this is far from the standard wartime miniseries. It is a beautifully turned ensemble piece, with everyone getting their time in the spotlight as we move between locations without anybody’s characters or storylines feeling underbaked.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    It was all as gorgeous, breathtaking, moving and harrowing as we have come to expect from this world-leading branch of the BBC. There is nothing to criticise or cavil at here.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Apart from the novelty of seeing Japan’s capital unfetishised – this is a Tokyo where people live, work and manage the daily grind, not a neon-soaked fun palace or futuristic hellscape – and the odd animated interlude (created by the company behind Hey Duggee, fact fans), nothing here feels new or revelatory.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    There are attempts at knowingness: at one point, our Henry tells someone a prophecy has to rhyme. This is not a good idea, as it throws into too sharp relief the limits to what Geralt and his merry band of sorceresses and proto-feminist princesses can be said to know. Play it straight, dear scriptwriters, or don’t play it at all. ... But again, if you like this sort of thing, go nuts.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    By nearly halfway through the series we have had only a set of decidedly unoriginal revelations revealed in a deeply pedestrian manner. You can feel the on-screen talent longing to let rip, but the script and the structure and the sense just aren’t there.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    Every relationship – or lack thereof – is beautifully drawn. ... In the second episode, it truly begins to take off and by the end, it is soaring. Bea’s uncompromising character and performance become something to love as well as admire.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Socially responsible nature programming that retains all its beauty – we have at last, and at least, come to this.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    I Love You, Now Die is a superbly perceptive study of the endless convolutions and complexities of the human mind – and the proliferation of both when two people in a desperately unhappy state meet. It succeeds in raising questions – gently, but relentlessly – about our prejudices and our readiness to judge, as individuals and through our institutions, from the media to the courts. Without losing sight of anyone’s misery or loss, it forces nuance – a characteristic increasingly absent from discourse – into the discussion.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It allows the mind to roam across many questions while the story unspools efficiently before you, asking little in the way of mental or emotional investment and giving much in the way of solidly old-fashioned whodunnitry. Pairs well with apple crumble and custard or large slabs of Dairy Milk.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    This sober, responsible production that has even managed to avoid the temptation of hyping it as Martin Clunes’s first foray into straight drama and aggrandising him or the production at their expense.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    There are no narrative twists awaiting us here. No miscarriages of justice straining to be heard. No insights into the complexities of an unfolding case or scandal of corrupt policemen, judges, clergy or politicians. The tapes themselves are the USP here. ... The only truly chilling thing about Conversations With a Killer was how unchilling it was.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    As a programme, Surviving R Kelly is deeply flawed. At best, it treads a fine line between attesting to the apparent pain of those taking part and exploiting it – and often gives in to temptation.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Remake Death Race by all means. Put a new twist on the zombipocalypse as The Walking Dead finally lapses into terminal decline, do. But bolting the two together creates distractingly bizarre results.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    It is, in short, an immaculately scripted (by Waller-Bridge) and performed (by everyone) half-hour – certainly up there with the best of the first series, and probably up with the best of TV comedy-drama entire.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    They [Nick Hornby, Stephen Frears, Rosamund Pike and Chris O’Dowd] have created something close to a masterpiece (or 10). It seems like a double-marriage of true minds. The quartet make it look effortless, even artless, but every aspect, every frame, every word, every beat is a perfectly considered, crafted and curated thing that creates something even greater than the sum of its parts.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    It’s another dazzling Murphy triumph. It has his trademark hurricane of a narrative that sweeps you up and deposits you breathless and agape somewhere else entirely an hour later. He has garnered a set of blistering performances from his actors.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The parts are all good – the scenery, the performances, the script – but they add up to slightly less than their sum. Perhaps it is the extra exposition that makes it feel too ponderous and prevents it from taking flight.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    There might not be much, narratively, that is new to adult viewers – but is there ever? Still, it is a fresh twist and the evocation of incorruptible Spielbergian innocence that is maintained by centring the show on such young protagonists is restorative to the ageing, battered soul, even if the head cries out that it could have been compressed into six episodes to no detriment and probably quite some benefit.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It is a tasty slice of cut-and-come-again cake, even if the relationship between Cassie and Rob – upon which the credibility of the story turns (or will, if faithful to the books) – is not yet sufficiently close or well-drawn.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    It promises to be a fittingly thoughtful and wholly absorbing last installment.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    While it is fun, and has moments of heart, it also has moments that seem to flirt with period drama parody.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    [Russell T Davies] aerates the heaviest, most fraught issues (from the insidious nature of tech, to income inequality, to the rapidity with which events can become both ancient history and rapidly repeated) with wit and optimism, so that they are no longer a burden, to us or the narrative, but grist to the mental and dramatic mill.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    Nobody does anything stupid, extreme, inconsistent or out of character. The beauty of the script and the performances – which build relationships so delicately and naturally, which modulate so deftly in and out of grief and laughter, and which turn ordinary moments into hilarity and heartbreak without you noticing how they got you there – will take your breath away.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    As ever, nothing is wasted; not a scene, not a line, not a beat. For every morsel of information gathered by the team and by the viewer, another turn reveals 100 hidden possibilities. It fits together flawlessly.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    Limetown is tosh of the highest quality. It has touches of Wayward Pines, second-tier X-Files episodes and that thing I can’t remember the name of but they all woke up in a hotel with no idea how they got there and unable to leave.

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