For 274 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lucy Mangan's Scores

Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Politician: Season 1
Lowest review score: 20 The Gilded Age: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 274
274 tv reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    As a new sci-fi show, it would be fine. As a big-budget, flagship production for Apple it looks like a fine opportunity wasted.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It is, simply as an apocalypse drama, good enough. And there are, as the series progresses, signs of hope that Yorick will be relegated further into the background, the female characters will come further to the fore, and that it will start to exploit some of the gyno-opportunities offered by the premise. It could just do with getting there a bit faster, that’s all.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The focus is wider (Jean and Jakob’s is one of the many adult relationships given more attention, and there are more students introduced too) and perhaps as a result the strokes are broader.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    In the opening half things are foggy. Thanks to the performances, however (including Hubert Point-Du Jour as nurse Josh, a vital witness to botched operations), things remain compelling at an individual level.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    For those who found The Terror – with its exploration of powerlessness, isolation and good v evil – too much in a time of powerlessness, isolation and overt battles between good and evil, The North Water is a warm bath. It occasionally shows pretensions to something greater.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    I’m sure the puff nature of the piece will become less obvious as the launch approaches and genuine drama and tensions start to fill the hours. But that doesn’t alter what it is. Everyone’s time and money, all those billions of it, could be better spent.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Sparking Joy has followed the principle of the book by not messing with the original TV formula.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    The show has lost none of its delicacy or nuance, nor have its makers disturbed its heart and soul – in fact, they have only added to it. All this, and extra Janice too. Quality pum-pum all round.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The conceit – a happy facade in front of friends and family, bleak realism when she’s “off” – is a good one. ... The problem comes as the series unfolds. ... We end up watching two increasingly unrelated narratives – the better of which keeps getting interrupted by a clunking 90s sitcom, complete with dull storylines about get-rich-quick schemes or the boss coming to dinner that neither illuminate nor complicate Allison’s story, nor create any thematic symbiosis.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    It’s a great achievement that none of this feels worthy or didactic. It feels like a genuine exploration, a dramatised discussion of intergenerational differences and divides that few are seeking to take the heat out of and examine with real interest. And it’s funny.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    There are good, funny lines scattered throughout as you might expect from a Nye script (he most famously gave us Men Behaving Badly but also the darkly flashing gem that was How Do You Want Me?, with Dylan Moran and the late, lamented Charlotte Coleman) but their sudden deployment generally just adds to the sense of unevenness. ... Lumley, Havers and Hawes together though – a shining moment that will do everyone good.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Matters of agency, courage and cowardice emerge and the story starts to accrue depth along with the superficial puzzle of the kidnapping and who saw what and when. If you can deal with the trifurcated timeline, there’s much to enjoy and admire.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    It all gets odder as it goes on. It’s not (just) that Hilton has only four phrases at her disposal (“So good”, “So bomb”, “Insane”, “So cute”), but that she is such a deadening presence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Script-wise, things are woeful. But the rest is great fun. It is another derivative but satisfying franchise that knows exactly what it is doing. Comfort watching in troubled times. Go out and find her.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    There is nothing new or revelatory in this documentary, I suspect, to anyone with a working knowledge of DeLorean or his rise and fall. The overall story, and its ending, is one of the oldest in the world. But it bears retelling – and this is a stylish retelling, at least – if only because we don’t seem to be any closer to learning the story’s many lessons.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Tattoo Redo manages to sidestep the elephant traps and stay light, breezy and really rather endearing, even before you add the joy of watching people create something from nothing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    The broadening and deepening must have felt like a risk to everyone involved in a show predicated on bringing light comic relief to viewers, and which then became frankly essential to their mental wellbeing. But it’s paid off. They shot and they’ve scored. God bless.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The series does exactly what you would expect and exactly as well. ... It’s a show about a man and his drooling dog, and superficial emotions are the order of the day. Rinse and repeat for the remaining 11 episodes, plus a season arc about a big case Scott Sr was working on secretly when he died from an apparent heart attack.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    If the whole show doesn’t add up to more than the sum of its parts, it is a lot of parts and Aduba holds them all together and makes them work. It’s worth booking your hours in again.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    Schmigadoon! passes the time harmlessly enough but overall, it is a one-note show and even that is too often flat. Must hit that exclamation mark harder next time.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    Bea and Horgan’s chemistry is as glorious as ever. They overlap and underlap perfectly, giving expansive but controlled performances that never take from each other. It is wonderful – indeed it feels almost a privilege – to watch.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    It needs another pass through the laugh factory. A thorough sanding down and a tightening of the plot screws by Mift and a few more squirts of lubricant from old hands such as Goodman and Crystal – whose scenes merely remind us of past glories – could create a vehicle truly fit for comic purpose. Monsters: get to work.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    If the film lacked the surprising revelations and investigative deep dives seen in the top echelons of true crime reporting, it should find its place as a sensitive and moving attempt to sketch the outlines of horror and grief.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    A three-hour documentary should do more than competently marshal facts (even if, as this one did, it gives decent consideration and screen time to the survivors). It has room to theorise and it should take it, rather than pad the time with the likes of Pasternak (and her assurances that she is “appalled” by Maxwell’s alleged behaviour, as if the rest of us are sitting around thinking of butterflies and marshmallows) and former friends with nothing personal or perceptive to say.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The great sorrow is that Disney does not have the courage – or perhaps desire – to lean in to the potential offered by this now-prescient and fertile setup.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Transcending the directorial workmanship and production values, however, is the simple sight of unfashionable – which is to say good, ideologically informed but practically executed – work being done on behalf of the disfranchised, the powerless, the underserved. It is deeply thrilling to watch. An unfamiliar feeling stirs, and rises higher with each episode. The feeling is hope.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    Everyone in the cast does good work with their thinly written characters, who have few redeeming features among them. Not least Byrne, whose commitment makes Sheila credible even in her most vicious or unlikely moments (stealing video equipment from a potential political ally foremost among them). But Physical feels like a wasted opportunity generally.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    It sets the bar pleasingly high, with a stellar cast giving uniformly great performances. (Jumbo was made for grief and fury, while Howle is tremendous as a nervy bundle of torments.) It also boasts a lovely, allusive script (particularly in the scenes between Strangeways and his therapist, played by Nathaniel Parker), and a well-paced plot that only occasionally depends on slightly unconvincing breakthrough moments in Frances’s amateur investigation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The first two episodes of Loki (which were all that was made available for review – there are six in total), however, felt flat. The opener was a lengthy, exposition-heavy setup that felt very static, and the second spent its first half going over much the same ground. ... Still, things do perk up by the very end of the second episode.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    The series is overstuffed and airless.

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