Manohla Dargis

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For 2,030 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Manohla Dargis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Gunda
Lowest review score: 0 Formula 51
Score distribution:
2030 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Manohla Dargis
    Patty Jenkins is behind the camera again, but this time without the confidence. Certainly some of the problems can be pinned on the uninterestingly janky script, a mess of goofy jokes, storytelling clichés and dubious politics.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Ashe is using a familiar, long-derided film genre both affectionately and critically to explore the gleaming surfaces of life as well as the anguish that lies beneath.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Manohla Dargis
    The story unwinds with histrionics and homilies, jazz hands and twinkle toes, overly busy camerawork and hookless lung bursters.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Manohla Dargis
    Sublimely beautiful and profoundly moving, it offers you the opportunity to look — at animals, yes, but also at qualities that are often subordinated in narratively driven movies, at textures, shapes and light.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Manohla Dargis
    The arc of the moral universe may bend toward justice. But as Collective lays out with anguished detail and a profound, moving sense of decency, it takes stubborn, angry people — journalists, politicians, artists, activists — to hammer at that arc until it starts bending, maybe, in the right direction.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Manohla Dargis
    It’s a lot of hooey and might have been at least tolerable if the movie had been rougher, meaner, tighter, and if the filmmakers — the writer is Nicolaas Zwart, the director is Miles Joris-Peyrafitte — had never watched a Terrence Malick movie.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    City Hall runs four and a half mostly engrossing hours, making it one of Wiseman’s longest. That sounds daunting, but I could have watched hours more of people simply talking to one another in auditoriums and across conference-room tables.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Zemeckis improves on the first film adaptation, a 1990 oddity directed by Nicolas Roeg. There’s more heart in the new version and more emotion, qualities which can go missing in those Zemeckis movies that get lost in his technical whiz-bangery.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Manohla Dargis
    The true miracle of this film is how Marcello translates both London’s scabrous tone and his lush, character-revealing prose into pure cinema. Lines have been plucked from the novel, yet even at its wordiest, the film is never weighed down by the burden of faithfulness.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Manohla Dargis
    Some filmed stage shows die on the screen from a sheer lack of visual energy and invention. Lee, a master of the art, uses cinema’s plasticity to complement this production, making it come alive in two dimensions.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The dirt bikes and their exuberant operators are the saving grace — and joy — of the sincere if overstuffed drama Charm City Kings.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    In the past, Coppola’s embrace of ambiguity could feel like a dodge, a way of evading meaning. But in On the Rocks, a wistful and lovely story about finally coming of age, there’s nothing ambiguous about how she makes us see a woman too long lost in life’s shadow.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Manohla Dargis
    Pitched artfully between the celebratory and the elegiac, it is an inarguably serious documentary with light, surrealistic flourishes that, at times, veer into exuberant goofiness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Like most commercial movies about feminist history, though, it also has a toothless vision of protest and empowerment that’s doomed to fail its subject because its makers don’t (can’t) risk making the audience uncomfortable.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Manohla Dargis
    Every faded dress looks attentively fitted, each ramshackle house artfully weathered. If the performances are considerably less persuasive it’s partly because Campos shows no interest in the inner lives of his characters. And while Pattinson’s and Keough’s roles are risible, the actors at least show signs of (comic) life.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    There is evil and it helps keep the world running, our clothes and food coming. This is the greatest, most difficult, most unspeakable violence laid bare in Rathjen’s measured, insistently political movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It’s lightly funny and a little sad, filled with ravishing landscapes and juiced up with kinetic fights (if not enough of them). It has antiseptic violence, emotional uplift and the kind of protagonist that movie people like to call relatable.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The scenery is pretty and the actors appealing enough to almost excuse the thinness of the material.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Here, after the gunfire dies down, terror at times gives way to a melancholy that can be quite affecting even if the message remains familiar: We have met the zombie, and it is us.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    By eliding the Legion’s history and focusing on winning personalities, the filmmakers have made an engaging movie about some kids who — as their jokes give way to debates, stratagems and even shocks — already seem to be drafting their own more interesting sequel.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Manohla Dargis
    The humanity of the leads fills up the hollowness, putting flesh, or at least charm and attitude, on their archetypes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Manohla Dargis
    There are some very good scenes in the movie’s second half; even so, it’s striking that the most unsettling aspect of “La Llorona” is that history doesn’t simply shape the movie. It also haunts and finally overwhelms it with terrors far more unspeakable than any impressively manufactured shock.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The movie tries to convince you that Douglas is better than his worst self and can transcend the dehumanizing degradations in which he’s mired. But not even the filmmakers seem convinced, which may explain why they embrace baroque brutality topped by a dollop of audience-mollifying sentimentality.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Radioactive, a thoughtful, very watchable fictionalized portrait of Marie Curie, tries hard to nudge the halo off its subject. Given her endeavors and accolades — including two Nobel Prizes — this simple, humanizing effort proves tough but also feels necessary.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    This is Garai’s feature directing debut, and it is as satisfying as it is promising, despite an unfortunate wind down. She has a great eye — and a real feel for the power of silence and visual textures — but she stumbles when she explains too much.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Manohla Dargis
    The story gradually emerges through an accretion of details and personal dynamics, often in families that stand in for the larger world. Things happen quietly or offscreen. The drama is measured out in sips, in gazes, gestures, silences, off-handed humor and shocks of brutality.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Manohla Dargis
    Kim works like a pointillist with lots of short scenes and daubs of textured nuance that build the portrait incrementally.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Manohla Dargis
    More than anything, Mr. Jones is an argument for witnessing and remembrance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The movie has texture but no depth, tears but no snot. Who are these people, I kept wondering.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The actors add some filigree to their genre types, but are consistently upstaged by the superb, supple camerawork. With the cinematographer Miguel Ioann Littin Menz, Patterson turns the camera into an uneasily embodied presence and when it takes flight so does the movie.

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