Margaret Lyons

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For 135 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 28% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Margaret Lyons' Scores

Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Making a Murderer: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Dr. Ken: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 54 out of 135
  2. Negative: 28 out of 135
135 tv reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Margaret Lyons
    It all feels very lavish. But there’s no escaping the Tim-and-Heidi of it all, and it can be like watching people who claim to get along better now that they’re divorced. ... The show sometimes feels unsure about its own commitments. The best designer and the most lucrative designer are not necessarily the same person. That hasn’t made “Making The Cut” less enjoyable. In fact, the show is a very successful recapitulation of the “Project Runway” theme.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Margaret Lyons
    I get that the main character is afraid to commit, but her show seems afraid to commit, too. At 10 episodes, it still feels superficial — beautiful, certainly, with an aesthetic that’s glowy but never sweaty, but vague.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Margaret Lyons
    “McMillions” is a fun oasis from misery, a comforting remote world where cheaters are caught and prosecuted. But it also feels slight and uncommanding, letting both your eyes and your mind wander.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Margaret Lyons
    These surreal asides are fun and cheeky, and they sometimes skewer the dumb social constraints of being a woman. But they are also frustratingly imprecise, and when the show goes too long without one, the emotional blankness of Jules’s world becomes too apparent.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Margaret Lyons
    The moments of emotional depth and humanity are rare — though sometimes quite touching — and the moments of cringing and overproduction are plentiful. ... It’s a forced setting in forced circumstances, and the show never shakes that sense of contrivance in the same the way that, for example, “Queer Eye” does.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Margaret Lyons
    The result is surprisingly refreshing, even with a title that suggests a sense of redundancy. ... The series is not a reinvention of its genre, but it shines in its little specifics, like the agony of listening to someone slog through reading stage directions out loud, or impromptu harmonies that are really just singing an octave up. The cast is bubbly and terrific, and the zingers (“my mother bounced back from an autopsy!”) keep everything from becoming schlockola.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Margaret Lyons
    Is it so different from “Better Things,” or “This Way Up,” or “Shrill”? Or “I Love Dick,” which Hahn also starred in? Only in that it’s not as good as those shows. It is better than “Divorce,” “Casual” and “Togetherness,” for what it’s worth.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Margaret Lyons
    “Looking For Alaska” is nostalgic for itself, like it’s admiring itself in a mirror instead of making eye contact. This neutralizes the immediacy and intimacy that can make coming-of-age stories so special.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Margaret Lyons
    There’s tremendous beauty and power in these therapy-adjacent works, but there is of course also an almost lurid sense of voyeurism. True reality is rare on television. Candor and honesty are rare in life. And thus there are moments on “Couples Therapy” that are frankly uncomfortable because even though I know that a patient recounting her worst experiences to her therapist isn’t being done for my entertainment … it kind of is.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Margaret Lyons
    Dreary and predictable. ... I would not want to sit with any of the characters in this adaptation. Everyone is either lousy or boring or both. ... The show is a strange misfire at every level. The self-conscious references to other rom-coms make it seem even worse in comparison.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Margaret Lyons
    A tale of human vulnerability doesn’t seem to have any human beings present. The home-life stories that are meant to add emotional heft are distracting and brittle, and the characters are under-imagined.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Margaret Lyons
    Everything that was good about Season 1 is still good in the first two episodes of Season 2, the only ones made available to critics.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Margaret Lyons
    Like “Transparent” and “Better Things,” it has the ring of seeming if not true, then true enough. Emotionally true. Part of that sense of genuineness comes from the show’s giddy specificity. ... The main reason Shrill lands is Bryant’s unfussy performance. She radiates the wounded hopefulness of someone who’s ready for the next chapter of her life, and by the end of the six-episode season, she’s there.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Margaret Lyons
    Consistently pleasurable. ... That’s the show: funny and light and loopy, able to make a meal out of what seemed like a snack. The show’s fifth season, which starts Wednesday on Pop, finds it having perfected its formula. Big on love, big on reactions, big on outré black-and-white outfits.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Margaret Lyons
    The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina is frequently chilling, but it’s rarely much of an adventure.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Margaret Lyons
    There’s no spark here, no big moment and most egregiously, no authenticity. There’s a flat phoniness to all the behavior, and a patness to everything.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Margaret Lyons
    The show at once romanticizes and minimizes suicide, which is something art sometimes does. But even worse, it’s all in the service of a slog of a story about irritating and unspecial characters. ... A Million Little Things never finds its way to an authentic moment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Margaret Lyons
    Manifest has a frustrating lack of propulsion, a central dullness whose force field is so strong it bends all the interesting parts toward itself.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Margaret Lyons
    You is a vicious thrill; smart and mean in all the right ways, with a devilish sensibility and a clever, inviting pessimism, like the friend who wants you to sit in the back with her and make jokes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Margaret Lyons
    Both [Amy Poehler and Nick Offerman] are upbeat and encouraging, and episodes include the two having dumb, wonderful pun-offs. ... A weekly dose of glitter and whimsy and some words of inspiration from Ms. Poehler and Mr. Offerman are completely and totally refreshing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Margaret Lyons
    In an era of TV bloat, seeing “A Very English Scandal” choose zippiness over ponderousness is a blessing, but one that occasionally feels more like a compromise than a plan. Length aside, the rest of “English” is precise bordering on surgical.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Margaret Lyons
    New Girl has amiably chugged along, hitting a few divots along the way but never sliding too far or permanently downhill. It’s one of the most consistent comedies in recent memory, so much so that almost any episode could be dropped in to any season. And these final eight episodes (six of which were made available to critics) are just like all the rest, even as the season premiere, “About Three Years Later,” jumps forward in time.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Margaret Lyons
    While Champions specializes in of-the-moment allusions, part of why it gels so quickly is that its character mix is borrowed from the sitcom bible: “Cheers.” ... Champions is off to a promising start.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Margaret Lyons
    There’s almost no conflict anywhere. The show radiates likability but lacks narrative bite, which makes it vanish from one’s mind the moment the episode is over.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Margaret Lyons
    An abrasive sitcom that isn’t merely unfunny, it’s also deeply unpleasant.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Margaret Lyons
    In its second season, it’s closer to its ideal state of flow, putting character ahead of plot and trusting itself and its moments a little more.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Margaret Lyons
    If The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story were a little more interesting, maybe it would be that lightning rod. But instead it’s a surprisingly inert, if lushly imagined, tale.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Margaret Lyons
    Esther and Benji are both fractionally employed and complain frequently about their miserable finances, their singledom and their lousy lots in life. What they mostly do, though, is compulsively talk about food and shame. Esther mentions a need to feel “skinny and pretty” twice in the first two minutes of the show. ... It’s a theme that quickly moves from quirky to genuinely disordered in ways that the show does not seem to notice.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Margaret Lyons
    As sweetheart hagiographies go, the doc is joyous and funny. No one seems bitter or cynical, and the movie is less an excavation and more just a sublime collection of hilarious people speaking thoughtfully about silly clips from 20 years ago.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Margaret Lyons
    The problem with White Famous is its lack of problems. Every potential conflict resolves itself without consequence or development.

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