IGN
For 81 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 19% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matt Fowler's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 90 Derek DelGaudio’s In & Of Itself
Lowest review score: 20 Cosmic Sin
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 38 out of 81
  2. Negative: 2 out of 81
81 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Chip ‘n Dale: Rescue Rangers isn't the first movie to do what it's doing -- with live-action and animation sharing the screen, helping nurture a meta-comedy adventure -- but it's damn fun and one of the cleverest uses of elder pop culture properties in a while.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Despite solid performances from Zac Efron and Ryan Kiera Armstrong, Firestarter feels stifled in story and presentation.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    The Cellar has a cool and creepy set up but then fizzles once the answers start arriving.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Metal Lords is earnest with metal but sloppy with character and story. It delivers a rousing finale but the journey there is uninspired and half-formed.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Cole Sprouse and Lana Condor are a fun duo, capable of feeling human and endearing in the midst of cosmic turmoil. The movie's not a full home run, but it's surprisingly silly and shrewd.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Zach Braff and Gabrielle Union are great pillars here, though the film itself isn't consistent enough with its tone, snapping back and forth between sweet sentiment and cheap gags.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Black Crab has all the ingredients to grab you and take you on a thrill ride -- and at times it achieves this -- but it suffers partial collapse by the end because of its need to land a little loftier than necessary.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Bruised is a good outing for Halle Berry as a director, though a better reminder of her as a star. Aside from that, however, the story progression is light on impact.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Zeros and Ones uses the spy genre as a thin mask for a fever dream that evokes nightmarish uncertainty.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Black Friday proves to be a winning combination of gloppy scares, well-crafted characters, and wise commentary.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Despite the inherent ugliness of watching a rich kid diabolically dig into a mom and dad who are just trying to save their home for the sake of their own children, Home Sweet Home Alone has some decent wit and heart to it. Archie Yates is good as the new precocious protector of his lair, but it's Rob Delaney and Ellie Kemper who anchor the film and give it something resembling a soul.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Kate Siegel does her best to elevate a simplistic thriller that follows all the same beats you're accustomed to.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Night Teeth's winning lead trio and its glossy, electronic buzz save this Collateral clone from sinking into full nonsense. The film's usually interesting, though it never truly strikes with malice or meaning the way it wants to
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Escape the Undertaker is a benign but effective use of Netflix's interactive abilities. Pairing the most macabre WWE Superstar with the company's most positive players makes for a fun showdown, one that you might wish had made it to official WWE TV -- not in this form, of course, but as a noble "turn to the dark side" storyline.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Matt Fowler
    There's Someone Inside Your House tries to make you think it's got a catchy, viable gimmick when in reality it's empty and unsatisfying.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Matt Fowler
    It's a bizarre and overly rambunctious ride that forsakes cleverness for Billboard acts and dizzying set pieces.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Matt Fowler
    The Starling contains themes of grief and guilt that are worth exploration, but finds itself unable to delve deep into these elements, instead relying on bad bird effects and a needlessly quirky and eccentric tone to gloss over most of the uncomfortable elements.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Copshop is meaningfully and enjoyably derivative as a patchwork homage to '70s shoot-em-up cinema (even Spaghetti Westerns), but it never quite reaches its potential.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Cry Macho has spare moments of charm and tranquility, but mostly it's a dry and unfinished story that fails to hit even the most basic of Story 101 beats.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Krysten Ritter, along with Winslow Fegley and Lidya Jewett, provide enough pizazz to keep Nightbooks afloat, creating an engaging supernatural hostage scenario.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Addison Rae and Tanner Buchanan are magnetic leads in this reboot that pays homage to the first film, but fully stands on its own. It manages to cut through modern high school b.s. while transforming two posers into presentable, likable people.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Vacation Friends may be a touch predictable, but John Cena and Meredith Hagner will make you wish you had friends like them on your next trip.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Paw Patrol: The Movie is a precious and peppy offering for the pre-preteen set that utilizes gentle character drama and buzzy action to stand out as a big-screen adventure. It won't be any parent's first choice, from an animation standpoint, but the standards of storytelling hold firm, making for an overall calm and comforting watch.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    The Last Mercenary has bounding energy and a fun take on star Jean-Claude Van Damme's past exploits as an action star, but the humor is way more miss than hit and the actual nuts-and-bolts spy plot is a trudge.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Fowler
    Jungle Cruise is a rollicking adventure full of humor and heart anchored by Dwayne Johnson and Emily Blunt's winning heroes.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Blood Red Sky could lose a few minutes, but overall, it's a ferocious and fun merging of vampires and hijackers.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Gunpowder Milkshake does its formidable cast dirty with a bland script, recycled story, and an empty comic book style that does little but shine up a stale outing.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    The Boss Baby: Family Business delivers middle-road mirth, full of action and quasi-clever jokes, and featuring the fun voice additions of James Marsden, Jeff Goldblum, and Amy Sedaris.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    The dystopian fantasy elements of the saga are now at their thinnest, painting a cinematic world that may hit too close to home for some. Ultimately, it's a solid entry that can either act as an ending or a new beginning.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    America: The Motion Picture is like Drunk History if the history were not only drunk but also on nitrous. Channing Tatum once again proves he's a comedy force to be reckoned with, backed by a stellar cast of capable and cunning joke spitters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Werewolves Within easily separates itself from the pack by delivering a quirky monster mystery filled with gentle laughs and massive maulings. Not every joke lands, and not every character fits, but overall it's an entertaining alternative to the season's more ghoulish and grim offerings.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    The Woman in the Window has both flash and fizzle. Amy Adams is great in the lead role, presenting us with a shattered recluse who wages war on lucidity daily, but the rest of the cast, while noteworthy, are sort of relegated to being plot pawns. Still, if you're looking for a higher class of claustrophobic Noir, and don't care too much about the resolution, there's a playfulness on display here that might scratch an airport novel itch.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    A pleasant surprise that both undermines and elevates typical revenge sagas, Riders of Justice is a unique blend that charms and captivates.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Wrath of Man has plenty of anger and action, and it's at its intriguing best when the entire story gets sorted out and all the players are on the board, but it stumbles at being a time-release mystery.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Fowler
    The Mitchells vs. The Machines is a ridiculous, riotous, and relevant adventure fill with great humor and winning sentiment.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Synchronic isn't a home run, but a decent time travel triple is always welcome.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Fowler
    The Courier is a tense, well-executed spy drama that wisely focuses on character and performance more than thrills, knowing that if we actually care about these men it will drastically heighten every narrowed glance, near miss, and frightful chase. It's not always the freshest adventure, but that's when the acting carries the piece and breathes life into these unlikely heroes.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    While sci-fi is generally rife with allegories, a steadier hand was needed here in Voyagers. The messaging, though noble and necessary, feels obvious to the point that it takes you out of the film. The cast is talented and the premise is promising, but the story plays out in a predictable fashion, which also works, in a way, to undercut the meaning.
    • 9 Metascore
    • 20 Matt Fowler
    Cosmic Sin is an excruciating watch, top to bottom, featuring an absolute mess of camera work, scenes where actors don't interact with one another, and bottom barrel sci-fi leftovers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Fowler
    This contest of wicked wills is a vibrant, penetrating Pandora's Box of predicaments and likeable yet evil central characters, played with satirical skill by Rosamund Pike and Peter Dinklage.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Tom and Jerry hit the big screen for a hybrid live-action romp that too often feels like it's not even their movie.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Cherry is big on style and features a bouncy, pricey soundtrack but its examination of the grim reality behind the veteran/addiction cycle feels rather routine. Holland breaks down many barriers here, performance-wise, and delivers the goods as a fantastic surrogate for societal ills, but the movie is plodding and, overall, an underwhelming patchwork of previous projects.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Willy's Wonderland is a no-frills splatterfest that, while straining to fill its runtime, finds mid-level chills and thrills thanks to Nic Cage bashing the hell out of weaponized pizza parlor characters. It's a shoestring slasher that gets the job done while also not fully rounding a few of the corners it teases.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Fowler
    Derek DelGaudio's In and Of Itself is a beautiful, powerful performance that employs art, illusion, storytelling, and its own audience to explore aspects of identity, isolation, and our own desperate drive to figure out who we are as individuals. There's nothing quite like it, which, as goes the uniqueness of humanity, is the point.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    Wrong Turn delivers a handful of timely twists and coats the franchise with a new, and vastly more interesting, sheen. It stumbles at times to balance all the themes it's trying to handle with regards to societal ills, individual value, and self-determinism but the end result is still a warped ride that could set up more thrills to come.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    The Marksman is perfectly watchable old man reckoning cinema, held together by good performances by Liam Neeson and young Jacob Perez, but it's ultimately not much more than an assembly line of non-surprises.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Outside the Wire is too long, too impenetrable, and not fun enough to warrant its lofty man vs. machine gimmick. It's fun to watch Anthony Mackie assume the role of a smart, cordial killbot, but the film's occasionally exciting bits of action aren't enough to breathe life into this muddled mess of a story.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    George Clooney's The Midnight Sky is a gorgeous, glossy doomsday odyssey that feels like too big a winter coat on a small, fragile frame.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Matt Fowler
    Grimy, "topical" pandemic adventure Songbird is pretty much D.O.A. It struggles to find life in its secluded settings while also, overall, just leaving a bad taste in your mouth. The love story never catches hold, the ensemble never gels, and the contrivances pile up beyond all repair.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Glenn Close and Amy Adams shine in Ron Howard's new, rather unfocused film about abuse, poverty, and addiction.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    The Christmas Chronicles: Part Two, directed and co-written by Chris Columbus, once again takes full advantage of Kurt Russell's exuberance as Santa -- and the full addition of Goldie Hawn's Mrs. Claus -- for a rewarding romp about young Kate Pierce's need to rediscover the holiday spirit.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Fowler
    The Croods: A New Age is a mightily medium follow-up to the 2013 original. The voice cast is great and the jokes are the perfect type of clever, where both kids and adults can get a good laugh. The story and emotional stakes are a touch thinner this time but that's to be expected, for the most part, from this type of animated sequel.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Fowler
    Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey already feels like a timeless treat. Though it's a little longer than it needs to be, Jingle Jangle is still filled with enticing visuals, holiday heart, and seasonal cheer. It instantly feels like a snug, fabled world ready to be explored.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Fowler
    Borat Subsequent Moviefilm may not contain all of the shock and awe of the original, since exposing racists has sadly sort of become commonplace, but it still contains an avalanche of awkward, anxiety-cranking moments that'll have you laughing while watching through your fingers like you would a horror movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Fowler
    The Outpost is a cleverly, and respectfully, crafted war film that uses a segmented, episodic approach to help you invest in the characters while building up to a very impressive battle sequence.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Hubie Halloween is aggressively stupid, sure, but it's also occasionally endearing (with a guilty chuckle or two).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Peninsula feels fairly derivative when compared to the tighter and more terrifying Train to Busan, but on its own, as an expansion of this universe, it's a rollicking ride through a hollowed-out hellscape. It's almost a complete genre shift, but not an unrewarding one.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Fowler
    The Rental boats a strong cast, an intriguing set up, and a compelling mystery. It's a fun and feisty web of lies and deception with the added bonus of having a shadowy, stalking presence surrounding everything and everyone like a God-hand. It's a small film, but it's tense, dense, and delivers a harrowing final act.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Fowler
    It plays into the dystopian fantasy of being able to reinvent yourself in a lawless world, delivering a clever tale about what it takes for someone who's not a part of existence to want to reengage with life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Greyhound has occasional bursts of violent excitement but it's overall lack of engaging characters, the unappetizing CG, and the lackluster story make for a very color-by-numbers outing from a headlining star capable of a whole lot more.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 40 Matt Fowler
    Even without the content of 2020 making the film feel even more unpalatable, Netflix's The Last Days of American Crime is a distractingly dull dystopian thriller with drab (and/or extraneous) characters and a squandered premise.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Fowler
    The Vast of Night is a minimal marvel, drawing out fear and anticipation with not much more than a cunning script, stirring performances from its young stars, and the starkness of the dark skies above them. Within it you'll find a Spielbergian love for sci-fi peppered with a twisted appreciation for negative space and the unknown.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Matt Fowler
    Simon Pegg and Lily Collins act the hell out of a script with a fun set-up and a lazy payoff.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    The Wretched's endeavor to meld a junior mystery with some pretty extreme horror works more than it doesn't, but ultimately neither side of this narrative coin gets explored as much as it should. Despite this, as a well shot and admirably executed thriller, it's a good entry into the catalogue of on-the-cheap scares.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Extraction works because its simple, yet sufficient, story allows the film's action to take center stage. If the stunt work were mediocre, the entire thing would be an utter waste of time. Thankfully though, Extraction boasts an exhaustingly awesome showcase of expertly choreographed fists, knives, guns, and explosions.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    The story's lifted a bit by some of the solid comedic actors, and the WWE Superstars who make a run-in, but when the story isn't sloppy, it's paint-by-numbers.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Coffee & Kareem keeps it simple, short, and to the (ultra) violent point as a raunchy cop comedy with clever jokes, zany action, and fun chemistry between leads Ed Helms and young Terrence Little Gardenhigh. It's a small cast but everyone in it is pretty funny, and the director easily knows how to craft a compelling mismatched partner scenario.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    The Jesus Rolls, while a passion project for the writer/director/star -- though it's unclear what Turturro wanted to do more: remake Going Places or do a Jesus follow-up? -- comes off like a flat fever dream. The famous faces are fun and at times there's a wee bit of misfit charm, but in the end it's clumsy and churlish.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 56 Matt Fowler
    Underground is cartoonishly raucous explosion porn from mayhem maestro Michael Bay that feels like a film that was made over a decade ago and was just somehow recently unearthed by Netflix. It's a testament to star Ryan Reynolds and his seemingly effortless charisma because without him the movie would have been a snow-blind mess.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Matt Fowler
    Sergio Pablos' Klaus is a beautifully animated mix of old and new - offing up a unique and quirky take on Santa's humble beginnings. It's a fun, fresh story about friendship and the power of kindness that coats snowbound cliches with a shiny sheen.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Fowler
    I Lost My Body stands as one of the year's best and most profound pieces of animation.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Fowler
    Noelle is often lifted up and out of a full rut by Anna Kendrick's energetic and gallantly goofy turn as the North Pole's most deserving and capable Kringle. Without her, Noelle is average fare, rehashing a lot of timeworn cliches from other, more clever, festive films.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 77 Matt Fowler
    The King is a relevant reshaping of Shakespeare's Henry V featuring a stunning turn by Timothée Chalamet.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Between Two Ferns: The Movie does its best to coat Zach Galifianakis' dense and dopey TV host with a larger story but, in the end, the best parts are still when it's just him glassily staring into the eyes of a movie star and telling them how much they suck at acting.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 58 Matt Fowler
    Point Blank's production bones are solid and the action itself is clear and capable, but the story is woefully past its expiration date and the attempt to tether it back to the types of "action movies we grew up with" falls flat.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Fowler
    Sandler and Aniston's chemistry elevates a breezy, bumpy overseas caper.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 72 Matt Fowler
    Triple Frontier features a cool cast and a gruesome story about greed, but it fails to capitalize on its own premise.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 78 Matt Fowler
    The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot lays all its cards on the table up front, but then still manages to never quite be what you expect it to be. It juggles a lot of ostensibly ridiculous ideas, but they all land just right because the film's deliciously dour tone, that sort of snuggles everything within the warm embrace of Sam Elliott's ruggedness and regret.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Fowler
    The film's a fun and humble horror offering set among the world of pretension and status.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 82 Matt Fowler
    Fyre delivers greatly on the delight in the misfortune of the wealthy and the shallow that we all expect and crave, but it also smartly doesn't hang its hat on it. It's mostly about the actual well-intentioned people involved in this fiasco and how anyone can be suckered into a vision or dream when no one in a collective is willing to speak out as a lone voice of reason.

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