IGN
For 81 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 19% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matt Fowler's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 90 Derek DelGaudio’s In & Of Itself
Lowest review score: 20 Cosmic Sin
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 38 out of 81
  2. Negative: 2 out of 81
81 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    Greyhound has occasional bursts of violent excitement but it's overall lack of engaging characters, the unappetizing CG, and the lackluster story make for a very color-by-numbers outing from a headlining star capable of a whole lot more.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 40 Matt Fowler
    Even without the content of 2020 making the film feel even more unpalatable, Netflix's The Last Days of American Crime is a distractingly dull dystopian thriller with drab (and/or extraneous) characters and a squandered premise.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Fowler
    The Vast of Night is a minimal marvel, drawing out fear and anticipation with not much more than a cunning script, stirring performances from its young stars, and the starkness of the dark skies above them. Within it you'll find a Spielbergian love for sci-fi peppered with a twisted appreciation for negative space and the unknown.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Matt Fowler
    Simon Pegg and Lily Collins act the hell out of a script with a fun set-up and a lazy payoff.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    The Wretched's endeavor to meld a junior mystery with some pretty extreme horror works more than it doesn't, but ultimately neither side of this narrative coin gets explored as much as it should. Despite this, as a well shot and admirably executed thriller, it's a good entry into the catalogue of on-the-cheap scares.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Extraction works because its simple, yet sufficient, story allows the film's action to take center stage. If the stunt work were mediocre, the entire thing would be an utter waste of time. Thankfully though, Extraction boasts an exhaustingly awesome showcase of expertly choreographed fists, knives, guns, and explosions.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    The story's lifted a bit by some of the solid comedic actors, and the WWE Superstars who make a run-in, but when the story isn't sloppy, it's paint-by-numbers.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Coffee & Kareem keeps it simple, short, and to the (ultra) violent point as a raunchy cop comedy with clever jokes, zany action, and fun chemistry between leads Ed Helms and young Terrence Little Gardenhigh. It's a small cast but everyone in it is pretty funny, and the director easily knows how to craft a compelling mismatched partner scenario.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Fowler
    The Jesus Rolls, while a passion project for the writer/director/star -- though it's unclear what Turturro wanted to do more: remake Going Places or do a Jesus follow-up? -- comes off like a flat fever dream. The famous faces are fun and at times there's a wee bit of misfit charm, but in the end it's clumsy and churlish.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 56 Matt Fowler
    Underground is cartoonishly raucous explosion porn from mayhem maestro Michael Bay that feels like a film that was made over a decade ago and was just somehow recently unearthed by Netflix. It's a testament to star Ryan Reynolds and his seemingly effortless charisma because without him the movie would have been a snow-blind mess.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Matt Fowler
    Sergio Pablos' Klaus is a beautifully animated mix of old and new - offing up a unique and quirky take on Santa's humble beginnings. It's a fun, fresh story about friendship and the power of kindness that coats snowbound cliches with a shiny sheen.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Fowler
    I Lost My Body stands as one of the year's best and most profound pieces of animation.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Fowler
    Noelle is often lifted up and out of a full rut by Anna Kendrick's energetic and gallantly goofy turn as the North Pole's most deserving and capable Kringle. Without her, Noelle is average fare, rehashing a lot of timeworn cliches from other, more clever, festive films.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 77 Matt Fowler
    The King is a relevant reshaping of Shakespeare's Henry V featuring a stunning turn by Timothée Chalamet.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Fowler
    Between Two Ferns: The Movie does its best to coat Zach Galifianakis' dense and dopey TV host with a larger story but, in the end, the best parts are still when it's just him glassily staring into the eyes of a movie star and telling them how much they suck at acting.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 58 Matt Fowler
    Point Blank's production bones are solid and the action itself is clear and capable, but the story is woefully past its expiration date and the attempt to tether it back to the types of "action movies we grew up with" falls flat.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Matt Fowler
    Sandler and Aniston's chemistry elevates a breezy, bumpy overseas caper.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 72 Matt Fowler
    Triple Frontier features a cool cast and a gruesome story about greed, but it fails to capitalize on its own premise.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 78 Matt Fowler
    The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot lays all its cards on the table up front, but then still manages to never quite be what you expect it to be. It juggles a lot of ostensibly ridiculous ideas, but they all land just right because the film's deliciously dour tone, that sort of snuggles everything within the warm embrace of Sam Elliott's ruggedness and regret.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Fowler
    The film's a fun and humble horror offering set among the world of pretension and status.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 82 Matt Fowler
    Fyre delivers greatly on the delight in the misfortune of the wealthy and the shallow that we all expect and crave, but it also smartly doesn't hang its hat on it. It's mostly about the actual well-intentioned people involved in this fiasco and how anyone can be suckered into a vision or dream when no one in a collective is willing to speak out as a lone voice of reason.

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