For 129 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nick Allen's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Tiger King: Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 Hoops: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 76 out of 129
  2. Negative: 4 out of 129
129 tv reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Allen
    Thin writing and slow plotting that's more focused on establishing background than making for a nervous present tense. A story with this many abrupt road trips and secrets shouldn’t feel this dull; instead they make the series into a hollow epic, sometimes filled in with cheesy villains and a couple bursts of action.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Nick Allen
    With pacing that’s best described as assured—in the allure of its writing, cinematography, performances, etc.—“The Essex Serpent” takes a bolder chance in letting its characters stew. “The Essex Serpent” successfully creates a full world beyond its marsh, oftentimes treating the monster as a revealing conversation topic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Nick Allen
    “The Staircase” is both a masterful moment for an assured filmmaker, and it's the jolt that the true crime storytelling industry needs. ... The ensemble work in this series is a veritable feast, of calibrated performances, framing and editing, scene after scene.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Allen
    “Under the Banner of Heaven” is a mighty busy show, sometimes to the detriment of its many ideas, its many stories, and all those Laffertys. But it is held together by its fascinating, unique way of presenting faith.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Allen
    “Gaslit” can struggle to make a smooth change quirky to gut-wrenching, but the series effectively takes the events of Watergate—and many of its behind-the-scenes people—out from the shadows.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    The writing sometimes takes too long to truly get things going, weighed down by creating its episode-by-episode mysteries instead of fired up by them. But that’s where the collective charisma of its cast kicks in, as they are able to fill in a great deal of the show’s gaps. ... Faraday contains a great deal of mystery, and that includes his motivation of hope and discovery. The show, at least in is takeoff, has enough of both of those to make you want to see what happens next.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    “Tokyo Vice” feels much different than typical American crime, with action based on calm, firm interactions that exchange secrets, and can be spiked with alternating honor and shame. Everyone is holding their end of a deal, until they decide not to. Aside from making for scenes of uniformly strong performances, it all gives the series an enticing slow burn.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Nick Allen
    “Pachinko” may not have the grandiose, accumulative power it seeks, but it does have many facets to recommend it, including the power of its storytellers, in front of and behind the camera.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Nick Allen
    Dawson offers a through-line to this story that can be a little emotionally broad or not as impactful as its main drama. Alma’s spirit may be one of the many sentimental symbols in this saga, but like the best parts of “DMZ,” it still hits home.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Nick Allen
    What does Hilliard do when he is assigned with taking Ptolemy to the bank? What does Robyn do when she sees how much Ptolemy has stored away? This narrative focus becomes one of its more ambitious elements, matching Jackson’s dramatic range in bringing this story to life.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 42 Nick Allen
    While the story whips up some acute psychological comedy about women in different generations experiencing and wrestling with the same mental illness, its supernatural attempts are junky. ... “Shining Vale” is the kind of series that just does not warrant its length, especially as its frugal supernatural points just barely nudge Pat to its larger scheme.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Allen
    The filmmaking is not shallow—it can have some inspired, immersive usage of angles and framing—and the performances themselves are not lifeless, even if they’re playing something straight that was originally sold to us like a reality-altering joke. ... But why would you patronize something that now feels like a knock-off, when you can enjoy more from the real thing?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Allen
    “Our Flag Means Death” is always stuck feeling like it’s either trying too hard, or not trying enough; it plays out like the kind of comic experiment that must have been fun for its actors and filmmakers, while we struggle to get on board with its freewheeling dopiness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Allen
    This is a show about boardroom violence; it can be fun to watch until it gets redundant, or numbing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Allen
    Like its sense of humor, the emotional gravity wants to be only modest. “Space Force” is good, or good enough, with what matters most to it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Allen
    “Jeen-Yuhs” recklessly breaks unwritten rules about doc filmmaking, about how to best frame someone else's story, and for no larger purpose than to serve its creators. The irrelevant parts within "Jeen-Yuhs" are made only more obvious by Kanye West’s actual, monumental relevancy, and the missed opportunity for Coodie’s hard-fought footage to amaze viewers by speaking for itself.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Allen
    It makes for some solid twisty TV storytelling, and death often has a formidable gravity as things get personal for practically every character.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Allen
    A show like “Murderville” is essentially hit and miss by default, in that some sequences are clearly more successful in getting a good reaction that others. But it has enough comic spark, and it's clever in how it indulges our constant fixation with the competency of solving crimes, while winding up its own absurd plots.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Nick Allen
    “In from the Cold” is a series that plays a relatively plain game, relying on flat characterization, fairly broad performances, and dialogue that either never lets go of your hand or winks right at you. But the action is sincerely, seductively good, and it helps counter the more greedy, thankless cheese.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Allen
    As someone who called the original superficial, this is the season that helped me “get” “Euphoria” and what it can be. But at the same time, its plotting and long-winded nature also make a great case that it should end with season two.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Allen
    As it goes with watching only one episode, always, it’s too early to guess the overall quality, but you can see what one hopes gets more development in later chapters. ... [Director Robert] Rodriguez had some very inspired fight sequences when he directed certain episodes of “The Mandalorian,” but the collection of brief monster rumbles, traps, and chases here leaves more to be desired.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    "MacGruber" the show is about as stupidly funny as you would hope. ... When it gets back to Forte and whatever dimwitted plan is forming in MacGruber's head, this series proves why the character deserves such an epic resurrection, and a second season.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    The cheesiness of the era amps everything up, all so that the awkward, devastating moments of silence can be extremely funny. Time and time again, “SMASH” made me laugh out loud—hard—and amazed that this show actually exists.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Allen
    “True Story” works best if you roll with all of that gratuitousness if you let its self-consciousness about legacy express itself with flaws.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Allen
    “Hellbound” is the kind of horror series that visibly grows with each episode, while it becomes apparent how much the storytellers have considered the scenario at hand in a very grounded sense.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 75 Nick Allen
    The twists are so wild that it would only make sense if this were scripted, but you have to remind yourself this isn’t a reality show. It’s very much a documentary. Only now, it’s about what the audience wants just as much as what it captures within these new celebrities.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Allen
    It's hard to get lost in this world when it feels so emotionally distant, so scattered, and so packed with thin plotlines.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Allen
    Marty’s story is a pitch-black story of not knowing what boundaries are, but the series doesn’t play up the absurdity enough, too self-amused that it got the packaged charisma of two stars to depict it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Allen
    The storytelling is all about keeping them in the same room or so, sitting and talking to each other. It’s a dull visual approach, and brings out the corniness of the premise that needs to be distanced from for this to work.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    “Invasion,” a new series that concerns a sudden alien invasion but is much more about the people, is a refreshing and often thrilling juggling of plot-threads that involve incredibly flawed or hurtful decisions made in the name of survival.

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