For 69 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nick Allen's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness: Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 Hoops: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 38 out of 69
  2. Negative: 3 out of 69
69 tv reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Allen
    Despite what some future headlines about this docuseries might say, there is nothing particularly explosive about "Allen v. Farrow," so much as profoundly humanizing.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Allen
    “It’s a Sin” is essentially a radiant coming-of-age story balanced with the sense that the party could end sooner than later. It's an often potent mix between that sense of feeling totally alive amongst your friends, especially at such an independent age, with the gravity of an epidemic that they don’t understand, that they aren’t informed about.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Nick Allen
    The overarching, constant idea is that Liz was indeed brilliant, but you had to live in her world. How powerful to see a docuseries that deeply reminds the viewer just how complicated someone's honesty and goodness can be, even if they have a long criminal record.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    In its comparably slower but highly rewarding third season, the show proves that fan service does not have to be an entirely cynical concept—it gives you what you want from “Cobra Kai,” in part because it continues to challenge how you see the whole story.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Allen
    There’s no Death to 2020 offers little reflection, and even fewer laughs. Instead, this star-studded mockumentary is more akin to the name-dropping, anti-clever parody of an Aaron Friedberg and Jason Seltzter film, like “Meet the Spartans” or “Disaster Movie.”
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Allen
    Delivered with such forceful energy (this show is always “on”) and an incredible amount of creativity (it’s nearly always funny), “Aunty Donna’s Big Ol’ House of Fun” is the sketch series for this year, and its madness is a blissful escape from our current reality.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    This first episode in the second season is a great example of how the series can work across scale—it can be intimate when it's two characters exchanging information in a vast open landscape, and it can also be massive with action scenes worthy of IMAX.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Allen
    This horror-comedy series just wants to make you chuckle, and with regards to its potential scares, only a little anxious. But it's so resoundingly slack and lazily written that neither its horror or comedy have that vital sense of timing, or danger.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Allen
    If “Hill House” provided a blueprint in how to tell a long, heartbreaking, and actually scary story, the failures and indulgences of “Bly Manor” are unfortunate examples in how not to.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    Some great horror television, especially if you enjoy being challenged by how tragic a scary story is willing to go. “Monsterland” still has a good deal of creepy demons and supernatural figures, but it’s the people who will be making you go from one episode to the next.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Allen
    Presented across numerous plot threads, “Utopia” is not for casual viewers, or those unwilling to dive deep into the bleak and batty. It's all part of a massive, playful game by Flynn, and it slowly sucks you in.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Allen
    Directors Daniel Junge and Steven Leckart serve up some answers with some never-before-seen footage and a swath of interviews, bundled in a generic package.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Allen
    A project that leads with its overall ambition, and while “The Third Day” still has a few narrative missteps to try to hold your attention, it makes for gripping, standout television.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Allen
    This is the season that helped me “get” the appeal of "The Boys," especially as it’s more fun to spend time with these characters well-past their try-hard introductions. ... But season two also proves that if the series is going to be so bloated and only sporadically punchy, it’s never going to be as powerful as it thinks it is.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Allen
    The show as a whole doesn’t really start to click by episode three (the first three episodes of the series will be released on the debut date of September 3). For all of the world-building that it does, and the way it tinkers with android character-building, "Raised by Wolves" struggles to fully grab you aside from getting you acclimated to its dry, heady idea of the future.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 10 Nick Allen
    “Hoops” proves that excessive cussing is just like canned laughter when it comes to comedy, in that abuse of either shows the extent of a show's desperation. Ben's profane outrage becomes tiresome pretty quickly.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Allen
    The story's gooey nature is fair game, but it’s nearly maddening by how unfunny it is, specifically being based around someone the world could use more of. ... Filled with played-out jokes like the pronunciation of “jif” or a plethora of culture shock moments like Lasso calling tea “hot brown water.” Like much of the show, it all feels very safe, which is often just a nice word for lazy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Allen
    It’s amusing alone to see them [Mel Giedroyc and Sue Perkins] here as neurotic daytime killers, even if their comic scenarios here can be big misses or big hits. Thanks to their always reliable chemistry, “Hitmen” is funny enough with its dark comedy that makes for equally light viewing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Allen
    This adaptation looks great but is definitively hollow, and in turn all of its parties, extensive discussions, and choreographed orgy scenes become simply exhausting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Allen
    There isn’t much of a debate to be had about the counter-productivity of the refugee system, or the gross use of force in maintaining it, and yet “Stateless” wants its characters to have these open debates for the sake of full-force drama. It's this type of “all lives matter” storytelling that constantly keeps “Stateless” out of touch with the humanity that’s truly at stake.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    While there might be no Robert Stack replacement to guide us, but the stories within “Unsolved Mysteries” will likely grip you just how the original show did. In the first six episodes that were screened for press, the series offers plenty for true crime fans to satisfy their fix.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Allen
    “Distant Lands” is going for 45-minute episodes, and if this BMO episode is any indication, it doesn’t have the same degree of punchiness. And perhaps because this first episode takes viewers to a whole bunch of different locations and follows BMO through some sudden emotional developments, it seems more erratic than that “Adventure Time” tightness.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Allen
    "White Lines" is all aesthetics, with little underneath. It’s a beach-read that you can watch, and yes, even escape to, if a sporadically amusing romp in Ibiza sounds like a strong antidote for this weekend.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    It’s telling that “Solar Opposites,” even in its first season of eight episodes, instantly feels like a full world, and one that's genuinely very funny without trying too hard.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    From the very beginning, Smith and Spall have winning chemistry as a couple you want to root for, hang out with, and watch fumble through this process. ... The way in which “Trying” often successfully layers awkward and genuine makes it compelling.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    You simply can’t review improv the way you would a scripted production, but the series excels within the form's different rules: it’s funny, it’s sharp, and the energy of the performers is as exciting as their creativity.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Allen
    Netflix’s beer-filled sitcom “Brews Brothers” wins you over with its amicability, even if it’s not as funny as it wants to be. ... But balanced with a clear interest in the world of breweries, and the people who would populate them, the lightness makes for an easy watch. Even if there’s not a lot of original frat humor going on, you don’t mind going back for the show’s next wacky scenario.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Allen
    "Home Before Dark" strikes an impressive balance, because its storytellers are willing to take all of its characters seriously, while carefully unfolding a good mystery that affects everyone. "Home Before Dark" has all the hallmarks of excellent family entertainment.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Nick Allen
    There is an immense amount of care to this story, which shines in its nuanced tone—it’s not as plainly silly as its absurdity guarantees.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Allen
    While "Unorthodox" has rich cultural detail in presenting this community back in Williamsburg, the tragic note it hits remains the same. In this story, religion is presented as a joyless life sentence. That’s an entirely welcome depiction whether one agrees with it or not, it’s more that it flattens out the story when it comes to making a challenging world or set of characters, and makes Esty's liberation all the more obvious.

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