For 137 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 29% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Pat Brown's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Shoah: Four Sisters
Lowest review score: 12 Force of Nature
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 82 out of 137
  2. Negative: 28 out of 137
137 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    The film is a j’accuse aimed at those complicit in oppressing the most vulnerable in order to protect the powerful.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 12 Pat Brown
    It’s difficult to imagine a high-concept thriller that coalesces around its one-line conceit less convincingly than Awake.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    The film brings us somewhere where we aren’t, and probably could not be, but nevertheless feels tangibly real.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    The film’s outward liveliness can’t mask the inner inertia it has as just another lifeless product assembled in a factory.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    The Woman in the Window never manages to transcend the impression that it’s merely being clever.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    In the film, Manaus is a place of irreconcilable tension between the lush natural world and the cold, metallic world of industrial modernity.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Pat Brown
    The film could be taken as an intentional travesty of the superhero genre, if only it weren’t so tortuously tedious.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    The film’s throwback nature is in sync with Ephraim Asili’s interest in wanting to keep the legacy of black activism alive.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Pat Brown
    Its characters are suffused with a paradoxical kind of fear that can only happen in a dream, the dread before an immense catastrophe that’s unavoidable because it’s already happened.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Pat Brown
    The film evinces Céline Sciamma’s profound knack for visual economy, communicating much with silent looks and structured absences.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    Sin
    Andrei Konchalovsky’s film is fascinated with the creation of great art in the midst of socio-political turmoil.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    The film’s overtly non-specific title is surely meant to suggest some kind of pared-down elementality, but, in the end, it mostly just reflects the story’s lack of definable character.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    Expending so much energy anticipating our avenues of interpretation, Malcolm & Marie leaves us with little to interpret.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    Supernova is so obviously structured that it often seems to be imposing meaning on its characters.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    This tongue-in-cheek gorefest gives the impression of an only semi-coherent joke on the audience.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    Throughout, Lynne Sachs undercuts the image of the past as simpler or more stable than the present.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    The film never finds the spark that would imbue the love affair at its center with a sense of passion or urgency.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    Paul W.S. Anderson has simply combined the established iconography of the popular Capcom game franchise with prefab movie moments.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    The film’s empowerment fantasy of a woman who steamrolls male egos is as stylish and fun as its portrait of gender relations is dire.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    The film’s orderliness of plot somewhat undermines the sense that the family at its center is steeped in a truly messy situation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    The film translates the often difficult realities of a specific kind of marginalized love into a story with broad appeal.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Pat Brown
    The film is an uncanny reflection of the jingoism that Hollywood has been wrapping in glossy spectacle and exporting to foreign markets for decades.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    Even though it’s about a person who speaks with courage about the urgency of the global crisis, I Am Greta itself doesn’t possess enough of that urgency.
    • Slant Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    Freaky doesn’t reach for any arch commentary beyond the suggestion that, hey, Freaky Friday the 13th is a pretty funny idea.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    The film slides seamlessly between empathizing with its clueless bros and making them objects of unsparing derision.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    It’s difficult to shake that the film finishes saying what it has to say long before it staggers to the end.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    While it can be expected that high-concept horror movies will often be sewn together from the premises of recent genre successes, it’s much too easy to see the stitches in writer-director Jacob Chase’s Come Play.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Pat Brown
    The repetitious plot is more ritual than text as we watch yet another Liam Neeson avenger defy the will of younger, unscrupulous men.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    Radha’s remaking of herself contains an uplifting, unpretentious truth about aging: It’s never too late to make a new start.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Pat Brown
    The film draws us through its play toward darker, too-seldom-considered sides of human and doggy nature.

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