For 97 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 29% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Pat Brown's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Shoah: Four Sisters
Lowest review score: 12 Force of Nature
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 57 out of 97
  2. Negative: 21 out of 97
97 movie reviews
    • 29 Metascore
    • 12 Pat Brown
    The film presents its scattershot cop-movie tropes in earnest, as if, like hurricanes, they were natural, unavoidable phenomena.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    With great clarity, the film conveys how discipline can be directed both inward and outward.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Pat Brown
    The film is an unnervingly beautiful tribute to the lives lost during the Holodomor, and to the people who have seen the world for what it is, instead of the dream of it they’re instructed to believe.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    Convenient plot twists undermine its early pretense that it’s aiming for something other than to exploit our deepest, most regressive fears.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    Artemis Fowl concocts an adventure that requires its privileged hero to go virtually nowhere, physically or emotionally. As if he ordered it on Instacart, conflict is simply dropped off on his front stoop, and all he has to do is throw on some shoes and sunglasses to pick it up.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    Russell Simmons’ victims’ sense of their own complex relations to historical power structures emerges from the film’s lucid recounting of the sexual assault allegations against him.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    From beneath defensive layers of distanced comic despair emerges a sincere story about a young woman’s emotional reconciliation with her troubled place of origin.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    Around his main character, writer-director César Díaz builds a complex but unpretentious interrogation of national belonging.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    Chris Hemsworth’s hyperbolically skilled soldier is borne of childish fantasies about the order of the world.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    In more than one sense, Justin Kurzel’s aggressively strange film queers the myth of the oft-lionized Ned Kelly.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    At its best, the film doesn’t just privilege altered states of consciousness, it is an altered state of consciousness.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    Given its hero’s imperviousness, the film’s chaotically edited action sequences tend to be devoid of suspense.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Pat Brown
    It’s difficult to imagine a more socially engaged or powerful condemnation of the exploitative gig economy than Ken Loach’s latest.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    This lively adaptation plays up the novel’s more farcical elements, granting it a snappy, rhythmic pace.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    It has almost enough genuine charm and heart to compensate for the moments that feel forced.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    Admirably, Yaron Zilberman’s film focuses on the cyclical nature of violence in a decades-old conflict.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    Throughout, the filmmakers occlude the most fascinating and potentially powerful elements of Jean Seberg’s history.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    There isn’t anything in the bleeding-heart positions espoused by Jorge Bergoglio that complicates Pope Francis’s public persona.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    Its performatively extreme imagery thinly masks a rather banal view of male subjectivity and inner conflict.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    Think Michael Mann’s Heat but in East Africa and with real-world stakes.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    Woke Disney, trying to navigate a tricky representational path, steps all over itself throughout.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    An airport novel of a movie, Bill Condon’s The Good Liar is efficient and consumable, if a bit hollow.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    Clarke works hard to make the messy, perpetually flustered Kate relatable, but the film surrounds the character with a community as kitschy and false as the trinkets she sells in Santa’s shop.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    Matthew Barney re-instills nature with some of the mystic aura that modernity, with its technologies and techniques of knowledge, has robbed it of.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    Like a traumatized psyche, it remains uncomfortably stuck in the past, replaying familiar events in an effort to empty them of terror.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    The film feels rather like listening to the arsonist calmly explain why he set the fire as we continue to watch it rage.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    Despite glimpses of a larger critique of the American project in Afghanistan, it lets us escape from the horrors of war before it finishes demolishing the illusion of a clean one.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    The film's command of action defuses concerns about whether it offers a thorough social critique.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 25 Pat Brown
    In transforming folk metaphors into utilitarian attributes of an action hero, Disney exposes the emptiness of their product.

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