For 52 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 30% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 69% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Pat Brown's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Shoah: Four Sisters
Lowest review score: 25 The Lion King
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 33 out of 52
  2. Negative: 10 out of 52
52 movie reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Pat Brown
    The film taps into universal truths about the passage of time, the inevitability of loss, and how we prepare one another for it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 Pat Brown
    There’s something very cheap at the core of this overtly, ostentatiously expensive film, reliant as it is on our memory of the original to accentuate every significant moment.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Pat Brown
    More than its violence, the film is defined by its vileness, its straight-faced attachment to outmoded ideas about masculinity and law enforcement.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Pat Brown
    A deeply unnerving film about the indissoluble, somehow archaic bond between self and family—one more psychologically robust than Aster’s similarly themed Hereditary. And it’s also very funny.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    Transforming Ophelia’s abuser into a helpful co-conspirator hardly seems like the most daring feminist reading of Hamlet.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    The film is at least as likely to elicit laughs as shrieks, and certainly unlikely to leave a lasting impression.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    In verbally recounting her history, Morrison proves almost as engaging as she in print, a wise and sensitive voice.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    The film seamlessly interweaves fun escapades and earnest emotions, but it lacks the visual power of its predecessor.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    The film wastes its charismatic leads in a parade of wacky CG creations whose occasional novelty is drowned out by its incessance.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    Sienna Miller lends credibility to a character that in other hands might seem like a caricature of the white underclass.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    There’s a surprising sense of communal exchange between the male strippers and their fans in Gene Graham’s documentary.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Pat Brown
    The film simultaneously announces itself as an expressive portrait of a city, an endearing ode to male comradery, a leisurely paced hangout flick, an absurdist comedy, and a melancholic reflection on gentrification and urban black experience.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    It's an R-rated teen comedy that proves that you can center girls’ experiences without sacrificing grossness, and that you can be gross without being too mean.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    As a musical, Dexter Fletcher’s film is just fun enough to (mostly) distract us from its superficiality.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    In pushing so many seemingly crucial moments off screen, the film transforms its main characters into blank slates.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    At the very least, Ryan Reynolds’s casting perfectly splits the difference between the adorable and the absurd.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    The film’s relatively static approach to narrative works in scenes where the material is funny or elevated by a certain performance.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    As it proceeds toward its telegraphed rom-com ending, the film becomes just more empty rhetoric, an ineffectual reiteration.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    Rachel Lears’s film is a rebuttal to the position that Alexandria Ocasio Cortez's election victory was an incidental event in American politics.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Pat Brown
    Ralph Fiennes’s film too conspicuously avoids an overt political perspective.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    Its major contribution, as one museum curator suggests, may be to bring the works of Moshe Rynecki back into prominence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    The film's slotting of two African women into a familiar romantic structure represents a radical and important upending of contemporary Kenyan sexual mores.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Pat Brown
    The film’s playful tone is a corrective to a century of scholarship that insisted on projecting the image of a moody spinster onto Emily Dickinson.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    With its naked celebration of self-sacrificial combat and idealization of the soldier as an avenging angel, it strikes a tone redolent of old-school war propaganda.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Pat Brown
    Michal Aviad’s film forcefully brings home a reality that many of us have been aware of only intellectually.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    The film might have better performed if it consisted of more than a smattering of good but relatively isolated ideas.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    Throughout, the film can’t decide what attitude to strike toward its characters’ evident greed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Pat Brown
    Michael Winterbottom’s film succeeds in translating the problematics of intercultural conflict into thriller fodder.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    Director Ty Roberts’s film is unable to realize that its subject matter is that of a horror story.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Pat Brown
    The film’s repetitive and lifeless dialogue robs otherwise charismatic performers of distinguishing characteristics.

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