Peter Bradshaw

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For 1,376 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Bradshaw's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Mildred Pierce
Lowest review score: 20 Taken 3
Score distribution:
1376 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    Editors Terry Rawlings and Peter Weatherley cut the film so cleverly so that we never have a clear notion of what the alien actually looks like until the very last shots.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    This superbly composed film comes as close to perfection as it gets.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    I was utterly absorbed by this movie’s simple storytelling verve and the terrific lead performances from Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone who are both excellent – particularly Stone, who has never been better.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    London Road was a mighty success on stage. Now it is a unique triumph on the movie screen.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    I have to admit, in all its surreal grandiosity, in all its delirious absurdity, there is a huge sugar rush of excitement to this mighty finale, finally interchanging with euphoric emotion and allowing us to say poignant farewells.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    The unmasking "reveal" at the beginning of the movie is a great coup, and the film continues to be very scary, helped by Carpenter's own theme: a trebly plinking of piano notes and that buzzy synth in low register.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    With his two early features, "Distant" (2002) and "Climates" (2006), Ceylan has showed himself a superb film-maker. This is his greatest so far.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    This is visionary cinema on an unashamedly huge scale: cinema that's thinking big. Malick makes an awful lot of other film-makers look timid and negligible by comparison.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    Claire Ferguson’s documentary is a powerful, valuable addition to the Holocaust testimony genre.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    A wonderfully composed movie in which Ingmar Bergman is able to vary the tone from melancholy to gaiety in the most deeply satisfying way
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    Graduation is an intricate, deeply intelligent film, and a bleak picture of a state of national depression in Romania, where the 90s generation hoped they would have a chance to start again. There are superb performances from Titien and Dragus.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    Gary Oldman’s superb livewire performance is now virtually an authentic testament of the man himself. Alfred Molina’s morose, self-hating Halliwell is also utterly convincing: Bennett’s script cleverly conveys their long years of bickering domesticity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    This is a jewel of American cinema.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    This new Star Trek is fast-moving, funny, exciting warp-speed entertainment and, heaven help me, even quite moving - the kind of film that shows that, like it or not, commercial cinema can still deliver a sledgehammer punch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    This is terrific film-making – enough to bring a rush of blood to the head.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    A Fantastic Woman is a brilliant film: a richly humane, moving study of someone keeping alive the memory and the fact of love.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    I felt wrung out at the end of this film. How incredible must it have been for those who were there in person.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    Sublime moments, of which the most extraordinary must still be Everett Sloane, playing Kane's former business manager Mr Bernstein, remembering the girl in the white dress on the Jersey ferry: "I only saw her for one second and she didn't see me at all – but I'll bet a month hasn't gone by since that I haven't thought of that girl." I'll bet a week hasn't gone by when I haven't thought about that line and pictured the girl so clearly that she has become a false memory of the movie itself.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    Beanpole is moving, disturbing, overwhelming.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    Clayton brilliantly uses slow dissolves to create ghostly superimpositions, and the harmless squeals of bath-time fun, or squeakings of a pencil, suggest uncanny screams.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    There is genuine fear in its nightmarish tableaux: the breast-feeding woman holding an egg in the ruined churchyard is like a detail from Hieronymus Bosch. And that final sequence, with the eponymous Wicker Man, is inspired.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    Anyone who says voting is a waste of time needs to watch this film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    Euphoric, sad and thoughtful all at once, this strange and wonderful film is rounded off with a gloriously well-crafted apocalyptic vision and a chilling intimation of divine retribution for earthly wrongdoing. The Coens have finished the noughties as America's pre-eminent film-makers.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    What DAU. Natasha shows is the bizarre way that, in totalitarian societies, the normal and the abnormal, the banal and the grotesque, and the human and the inhuman live together side by side.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    This is a powerful, superbly crafted film with a story to tell, avoiding war porn in favour of something desolate and apocalyptic, a beachscape of shame, littered with soldiers zombified with defeat, a grimly male world with hardly any women on screen. It is Nolan’s best film so far.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    After all those false dawns, non-comebacks and semi-successful Euro jeux d'esprit, Allen has produced an outstanding movie, immensely satisfying and absorbing, and set squarely on American turf: that is, partly in San Francisco and partly in New York.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    The crystalline black-and-white cinematography exalts its moments of intimate grimness and its dreamlike showpieces of theatrical display. It is an elliptical, episodic story of imprisonment and escape, epic in scope.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    An enormous pleasure. The performances are so fresh and natural – yet so subtle and delicately judged. The direction is superb in its control and the cinematography creates a gripping docu-realist vision.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    It’s impossible not to be swept along and caught by the details: the pompous army officer falling into the barrel, the anarchist (played by a young Klaus Kinski) watching an old couple affectionately cuddling on the train, Zhivago himself suddenly shocked at his own haggard reflection in the mirror. Lean was hunting big game, and catching it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    A bold, intelligent, romantic film with all the lineaments of a classic, and a score by Vangelis as instantly hummable as the music for Jaws.

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