For 432 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Overnighters
Lowest review score: 12 Hell Baby
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 57 out of 432
432 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The clichéd dialogue, stereotypical characters (except for Toby Jones, who distinguishes himself as the wryly incompetent company cook), and the constrained setting (it takes place almost entirely in the officers’ dugout) deadens the suspense and diminishes the mood of dread endured by those awaiting their doom.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    At a time when financial regulations have been gutted, stock market indexes reel, and trade wars threaten, Jed Rothstein’s slick and revealing documentary The China Hustle should only add to the anxiety and gloom.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    If anything, Chernick’s film shows a life that may be too perfect. In addition to his triumphant career, Perlman has a seemingly ideal marriage — to Toby, a woman who is his match in ebullience, wit, and passion for art and music. It has lasted for more than 50 years.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Beautifully photographed, well composed, but disappointingly superficial.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The message is clear, if not original: stray from the herd and you’re dead. What makes Hirayanagi’s iteration of this familiar theme appealing are the quirky characters, the nuanced performances, and the curious cultural topography of Tokyo.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    As a portfolio of visionary images of surreal landscapes and hallucinatory flora and fauna, the movie sometimes dazzles. But as a metaphorical narrative, it often fizzles.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A moody, mannered, and lingering coming-of-age story with a Stephen King-like twist.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    More than an hour passes before Khaled and Wikström’s stories intersect, and though it would be an exaggeration to say each redeems the other, in this film the other side of hope is not despair, but decency.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Sharif is a paragon of decency and endurance, but his camera skills are limited and often constrained by circumstances. For the most part this roughness reflects the raw immediacy of the experience.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Channeling Nye’s own gift for making complex ideas simple and clear, the filmmakers edit together these various aspects of Nye’s life with deceptive ease, drawing on interviews and archival material and following him throughout his hectic schedule. This is not hagiography, however; they don’t back off from examining some of his more controversial endeavors and characteristics. That includes his fondness for the spotlight and his ambition, which in a couple of instances has backfired on him.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Though he might be uncertain about sex, or even kissing and cuddling, Scott is an incurable romantic. And steadfastly loyal and kind. The value of that is made clear when the filmmakers disclose the full tragedy and horror of what Dina has gone through, and when he sings to her “Before the Next Teardrop Falls.”
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The film confronts not just the expected issue of environmentalism but also explores themes of survival, separation, loss, and death.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    What emerges from this pretentious if diverting mishmash is a story that is equally predictable and contrived, but nonetheless offers some worthwhile insights into the notion of the male gaze and the subjugation of women.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    These successes are inspiring, but deeper and more complex emotions are unexplored. It’s no fault of Foy’s performance; she brings depth, humor, and conviction to her role as the devoted wife. Garfield, on the other hand, labors mightily but can’t overcome the superficiality of the character as scripted by William Nicholson (“Shadowlands”).
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    In the end, the film describes not so much an arc as a circle. Kim, who had criticized the World Bank for its callous approach to financing health care for the poor, is appointed its chairman by President Obama in 2012.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    More problematic for Hudlin is the nature of the case — only by proving that a rape victim is a liar can Friedman and Marshall win an acquittal for their client. Fortunately, the case (in the film, if not in real life) is resolved in such a way that racism and misogyny are found equally guilty.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In Brad’s Status, Stiller becomes the face of white male privilege — and its comeuppance.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Jolie does not dwell on the atrocities, though a horrifyingly ironic battle scene near the end contains some gruesome imagery.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    After Love is like being stuck at a dinner with an unpleasant couple who won’t stop squabbling.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Kogonada establishes a meditative tone and rhythm as his compositions parallel the building’s pleasing symmetries.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    After Lake Bell’s smart, unconventional debut, “In a World. . .” (2013), her new film, I Do . . . Until I Don’t (she apparently likes ellipses in her titles), is disappointingly ordinary.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The main reason it does not seem contrived is the performances of Catherine Deneuve and Catherine Frot. Because of their authenticity, and Provost’s mostly sure hand at maintaining mood and tone, the film is a moving immersion into the mysteries of time, memory, and mortality.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Funny, heartbreaking, impeccably observed, and nearly flawless drama.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The painterly beauty of anime detaches the viewer from the terrible events depicted, but it also makes these cataclysms more accessible to the imagination.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Step, the African-American competitive art that is the subject of Amanda Lipitz’s taut, intimate, passionate, and celebratory documentary of the same title, is not to be confused with its Irish namesake in “Riverdance.”
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Maybe if the filmmakers suggested that these villains were once children with mothers themselves, it might have made their crime, and the chase that ensues, less one-dimensional.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    This is a hard movie to watch, and even more painful to think about.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Rendered heartfelt and compelling by an outstanding cast.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The film manages to be both crudely hilarious and bluntly satiric while also establishing sympathetic characters, a sharp contemporary wit, a sly, dry absurdism.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    The story offers many opportunities for glibness and sentimentality. Walsh falls for none of them. She enhances the grimness of Lewis’s surroundings, but does not exploit it.

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