Robert P. Laurence

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For 153 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robert P. Laurence's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Boomtown: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Uncle Buck: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 94 out of 153
  2. Negative: 25 out of 153
153 tv reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Robert P. Laurence
    Shot in an impressively glossy style, and in wide-screen, Wolf Lake at least looks good, in spite of a lack of the visual effects one might expect in a series like this one. [09 Sep 2001]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Robert P. Laurence
    Cybill crackles with that kind of wry, brittle, unexpected wit and it could well rejuvenate the sagging CBS Monday night schedule. [01 Jan 1995]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Robert P. Laurence
    If you are over 12, you can look at it one of two ways: You can regard it as hopelessly silly or, if you're in a silly mood, just go along and enjoy it. [29 Sep 1985]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Robert P. Laurence
    Like TV teachers back to the time of "Room 222" and beyond, Mr. Rhodes is depicted as the one teacher in the school who really knows what kids need and want, who will constantly have to buck an unfeeling, insensitive bureaucracy and a staff of stodgy, disapproving older teachers. [23 Sep 1996, p.E1]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Robert P. Laurence
    Offers some deliciously shocking moments, several sequences when you may want to remind yourself: "This is not real. [17 Nov 1990, p.C-9]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Robert P. Laurence
    ABC really has done a fabulous job in the special effects department, though, particularly as the story reaches its messy, apocalyptic climax, complete with decapitations, oozing blood, stranglings and exploding monsters. Oh. Did I mention that there's quite a bit of violence? But the whole project, photographed in New Zealand (apparently the real Maine doesn't look enough like Maine), is gorgeous to look at and offers some excellent performances, particularly by Marg Helgenberger as Bobbi, the writer who uncovers the strange force, and Jimmy Smits as Gard, a poet and her live-in companion. [9 May 1993]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Robert P. Laurence
    Spielberg appears to be suffering from movie-industry arrogance, the belief that any old piece of tripe will sell on TV. He certainly would not have tried to film a script like this for one of his mega-movies. Where's Jules Verne when we need him? [12 Sept 1993, p.TV16]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 56 Metascore
    • 90 Robert P. Laurence
    "Ghost Train" was an auspicious start...Spielberg has been working with movies of two or three hours length for a long time, but he can still tell a powerful story in the 25-or-less minutes allowed in a half-hour of commercial television. [30 Sept 1985, p.C-7]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Robert P. Laurence
    Viewers are not accustomed to finding programs of this caliber on Fox, and they certainly will not expect it right after the tawdry "Melrose Place." But make the effort. You'll be glad you did. [11 Sept 1994, p.TV-17]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Robert P. Laurence
    viewers need to breathe now and then, they need to smile, they need to break the tension. Wonderland, however, drags the audience into the maelstrom of Bedlam and never lets go. [28 March 2000, p.E-7]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Robert P. Laurence
    Titus deftly carries off the delicate trick of creating comedy out of a background of tragedy and chaos, and for that it deserves a look. [20 March 2000, p.E-7]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Robert P. Laurence
    Son of the Beach is sophomoric, off-color, tasteless, obvious, sexist and offensive to several races. It's also fairly funny, a cheeky, sunny, goofy, low-budget "Police Squad!" version of "Baywatch" produced by that nasty-talking proponent and arbiter of everything tacky in American mass media, Howard Stern. [14 March 2000, p.E8]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Robert P. Laurence
    It worked for the Monkees. Maybe it'll work for O-Town. The concept is almost the same. [24 March 2000, p.E-11]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Robert P. Laurence
    Slickly produced, compellingly written and expertly directed. [19 March 2000, p.TV-6]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Robert P. Laurence
    The situation seems hackneyed from the start, and so do the characters. [23 March 2000, p.E-5]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Robert P. Laurence
    The usually reliable producer Gary David Goldberg ("Spin City," "Brooklyn Bridge," "Family Ties") has imitated the props, plot devices and characters from the original ("Barney Miller"), but duplicating wit, mood and casting chemistry have proven more elusive.[23 March 2000, p.E-5]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Robert P. Laurence
    It will take more than good intentions and warm feelings to make City of Angels a success. [14 Jan 2000, p.E-1]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Robert P. Laurence
    A very, very long, sometimes absorbing, often boringly detailed and overly technical docudrama. [5 Apr 1998]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert P. Laurence
    Certain scenes are powerful, even exhilarating. Others don't work at all. [23 Sep 1990]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Robert P. Laurence
    A likable, even enjoyable, but hazily defined series with no clear sense of where it wants to go. [28 Sept 2001, p.E-12]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Robert P. Laurence
    Not that That Was Then is poorly done. The production is polished, and performances are excellent throughout, particularly those of Jeffrey Tambor as the self-absorbed father and Tyler Labine as Pinkus, Travis' manic pal...But the atmosphere is awfully heavy, self-consciously sober. [27 Sept 2002, p.E-7]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 33 Metascore
    • 37 Robert P. Laurence
    Miserable excuse for comedy. [19 Sept 2003, p.E-11]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 25 Metascore
    • 25 Robert P. Laurence
    Goofy, silly, trying to be hip, lighthearted and loose, but ending up merely stupid, a dopey mix of inane dialogue, hints of sex, gunfire and blood. [29 Aug 2004, p.TV-6]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Robert P. Laurence
    Suffers from excessive ambition, but only through the best of intentions. [10 Sept 1993, p.E-1]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Robert P. Laurence
    Too gimmicky for my taste. [22 Sept 1986, p.D-1]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 13 Metascore
    • 0 Robert P. Laurence
    Pointless gimmicks, dire stupidity, rotten acting and gratuitous violence abound, and, in the opening episode, so does implicit racism. The treatment of blacks in 21 Jump Street marks a new and unwelcome chapter in TV's history of on-screen racism; they are unquestionably portrayed as savage, violent figures threatening vulnerable whites. [11 Apr 1987, p.D-13]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Robert P. Laurence
    "Sleepwalkers," a short-lived NBC series from two seasons back, also asked viewers to care about characters who only dreamed that they were in peril. The sleepwalkers only drew a yawn from viewers, and it turned out that NBC programmers who thought the audience might actually care about such a situation were the ones who believed in fantasy. Fox may be repeating the delusion. [8 Oct 1999, p.E-10]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Robert P. Laurence
    If you watched "The Larry Sanders Show," you'll find that Beggars and Choosers is weak tea. [18 June 1999, p.E-10]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 58 Metascore
    • 37 Robert P. Laurence
    Ominously dark, loaded with splashy visual special effects and soundtrack whooshes and vrooms, with costumes by the Frederick's of Hollywood Martial Arts Division, Birds of Prey bogs down early in lengthy and tedious exposition, the sort of back-story explanation that scriptwriters call "laying pipe." [8 Oct 2002, p.E-6]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Robert P. Laurence
    The drama itself will look and sound familiar to anyone who remembers "Twin Peaks," ABC's short-lived freakazoid hit of the early 1990s. Weird music, weirder lighting, menacing characters, dark forebodings. Perhaps the biggest mystery is the producers' choice of a hero, an IRS agent, not a figure most dramatists would pick for his sympathetic qualities. [17 Sept 2002, p.E-6]
    • San Diego Union-Tribune

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