For 4,309 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Moore's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Magician: The Astonishing Life and Work of Orson Welles
Lowest review score: 0 The Room
Score distribution:
4309 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    It’s the title character and the great character actor playing him that turns this otherwise decent indie Western into something special. And Nelson pulls that off every time he squints or opens his mouth.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    The film manages to be intriguing but seriously dull.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    A winning and quite moving look at the immigrant experience, and how fragile and fraught this past decade’s politics have revealed it to be.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    I dare say every review of this adaptation has the words “well-intentioned” in it. “Sweet,” too. So it is. But if that’s the best thing you can say about it, well…
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Roger Moore
    Writer-director David Midell cast this well, turned in a script with a bitter, metallic aftertase and never wastes a second of screen time, giving us two points of view — outside and inside that door — letting us stay one step ahead of this slow tumble off a cliff.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    You’d have to go pretty far wrong to get me to pan anything pairing up Plaza with Caine, and Best Sellers tries its best, at times. But Caine does a grand grump, and Plaza reaches beyond her repertoire of eviscerating, man-eating side-eyes. They make this page-turner worth sticking with until the bittersweet end, and that’s enough.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Boris Karloff: The Man Behind the Monster is an adoring appreciation of a screen icon, one of the founding figures in the birth of The Horror Movie, a cultured man who made his good name scaring generations half to death.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    Throwing a lot of production design at the limp stories within this recycled tale doesn’t make it look or play scary. It just makes it loud and expensive looking.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Patel turns a “straight best friend” cliche into a quietly compelling sounding board, and never lets us see the wheels turning. And Harwood does well enough by a preening character who is as capable of teen cruelty as any classmate, and frankly often unlikable.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    There’s no reason this cast with this story in this setting shouldn’t have been something almost hilarious. There’s little evidence on the screen that was ever going to happen.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    A screen elegy is supposed to make you sad and give the viewer an appreciation for all this character and the actor playing him was, and a little of what remains. Cry Macho just generates pity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    And no, it doesn’t make much sense. Surely this is the strangest movie Cage has ever been in, and that’s saying something. But arresting image follows arresting image in Sono’s fevered vision.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    The slack pacing and generally flat performances rob “Last Night” of any urgency and lower the stakes.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Chastain is perfect. Forget the prosthetics and the “clown makeup” mimicry. She gets under the character’s skin, sings in her own voice and never lets an insincere moment flicker by on the screen.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    The pacing doesn’t build dread, the characters don’t build empathy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    Schrader’s made a long meditation on something that’s right up his alley, and it still feels incomplete while it’s in progress, and even in the final reckoning.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Nowhere Inn never quite crawls out from under the David Byrne influence as a movie or a film conceit. It’s more droll than funny, and only novel in the sense that she’s mocking the conventions of such movies and they’re beyond mockery at this point.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    It’s not another “Romeo & Juliet” variation, even if the title suggests that. The stakes are low, the tropes too familiar and while the leads may get across the intensity of their crush with just their eyes, they don’t bring much else to this formulaic, tepid teen romance.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    This one just never seems to end, and when the illogical end arrives, a laughably dumb coda is layered on top of it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    Performances? Nobody in this will be topping their resume with it. Neither will the director. Let’s hope it’s just a blip, a disaster soon to be forgotten by him and the studio that wrote the checks for it. I’m pretty sure he already has.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    It’s not much fun, and not particularly gripping.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    This may not be the “definitive” Capote biography. Perhaps PBS will be the one to get around to that, some day. Burnough’s still made an entertaining and generally brisk overview of the career and the life of the most famous writer of his day.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    The first act of “Queenpins” makes you giddy at the comic possibilities, but the finale is the final straw in the letdown it too-quickly becomes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Even in the film’s third act lurch into sheer melodrama, with brittle conversations carried out on eggshells, Morales and Duplass are wholly immersed in character. The twists are believable because they’re totally credible in their roles.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    The film needed more scenes, more background, more fizzy fun and more pathos for any of this to come off properly.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    The stage magic here is the simplicity of the production — just characters in chairs, swaying in time to simulate a bus ride, singing as they do.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Sad to say that adults in positions of authority acting like adults — diplomatic, courteous — is the most refreshing historical artifact resurrected in Worth.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Kurosawa has made a period piece with believable characters and intrigues that generally avoid melodrama. The stakes are human-scaled and deathly personal.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    A couple of bit characters come closest to landing a laugh. None of the leads do. The script is social media savvy, making tepid jokes about the “commitment” difference between a couple selfie “in your story” or on “your grid” on Instagram.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    The air goes out of the balloon, bit by bit, through a Macau fight club and high rise scaffolding chase, and the long middle acts settle into tedium, exposition and entropy.

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