For 496 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Davis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 12 Years a Slave
Lowest review score: 0 I Am Sam
Score distribution:
496 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    Less adventurous in structure than many in Davies’ oeuvre, Benediction is both expressionistic and vivid in recounting selected particulars of an outwardly fascinating life, though something feels missing in the totality of things.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    Unrelenting and inconsolable, with a smattering of compassionate moments, the superb Vortex brings to mind an observation attributed to actress Bette Davis, no less: Getting old ain’t for sissies.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    The Aviary, a modest mindf*ck of a thriller about two young women fleeing a cult in the New Mexican desert, goes round and round and round in a circle like a snake swallowing itself. A beguiling metaphor, but by the end, you’re left with a self-cannibalized movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    While the movie’s nonlinear construction is its selling point, at least for those moviegoers who prefer a bit of a challenge, an underlying vibe of melancholy gives Mothering Sunday thematic weight.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    For a while, you wonder whether the movie will become a thriller about the perils of solo travel, particularly for single females. But the intimacy of director Kuosmanen’s Dogme 95-inspired camerawork hints that something more is happening here.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    Dog
    Though occasionally emotional, this ain’t no heart-tugging rehash of Lassie Come Home. And there’s something to be said for that.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    At first, you fear this uncharted emotionalism may undercut the delicious pleasures of Christie’s clever plotting, this one being a particularly nifty stumper, but in the end, it subtly enhances the film without being pretentious.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    Director/screenwriter Giarratana occasionally summons up a lovely moment, although the overall tone is inconsistent.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    The story and screenplay by Cameron Larsen and Jose Prendes, respectively, take a significant liberty with the legend for the purpose of a last-minute revelation that’s more a yawner than anything. But even if the disclosure had worked, the film offers little authentic horror (the one jump scare doesn’t count) and its suspense is negligible, though some creepy imagery, such as scorched dismembered doll arms, may momentarily get under your skin.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    While Levi gives you someone to genuinely root for, once the movie reaches Warner’s debut game for the Rams in 1999, all nuance goes out the window as you’re pounded into semi-hysterical submission to cheer for a proverbial win for the gipper.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    All said, Nightmare Alley is something to be admired, rather than treasured. It’s big, classic moviemaking with a moral in the end. And there can be a lot to be said for that.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    Spielberg suppresses his worst tendencies in the uncharted territory of his first movie musical. His solid direction respectfully doesn’t oversentimentalize the material.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    With its bold visual sense and fanciful storyline (credited to six writers, no less), Encanto feels like a companion piece to Coco, but it has nowhere near the same emotional heft as that far superior 2017 Oscar-winner.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    The micro-homilies proliferate, the stagy drama heightens, and subtlety gives way to a little pandering. You can forgive these transgressions – there’s never any doubt that Branagh has put his heart into this endeavor – but they keep it from achieving greatness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    Though this capable documentary is comprehensively informative in so many ways (perhaps to a fault), the one thing it doesn’t quite convey is the wonder and marvel of the undersea world of Cousteau, which continued to move him until his death at age 87.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Steve Davis
    With the exception of Kroll’s gravelly-intoned Uncle Fester, the voicework is sketchy, with Theron’s Seven-Sisters elocution bordering on sacrilege.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    Regardless of whether Cry Macho merits a rating of good, bad, or ugly, Eastwood’s mere presence, despite any perceived physical frailties, can’t help but dwarf this slenderest of movies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    It’s a titillating story of social suicide worthy of Capote’s imagination, had he only dared to inscribe it with his own words.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    Honestly, both Sex and the City and Seinfeld tackled the romantic pitfalls of youngish single life in NYC more adeptly in their relatively truncated formats than this 91-minute movie, and with a helluva lot more verve and wit.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    The impressionistic documentary Ailey communicates this visionary auteur’s comprehension of the art form: through his own words; through the words of others, most notably, his muse Judith Jamison and fellow choreographer Bill T. Jones; and, with great potency, film clips of archived performances (some of them original performances!) of his work.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    It’s overwhelming, but there are a few nice touches that aren’t completely lost in the bedlam.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    Like the jelly-bean sugar high in one of the more manic running gags, it’s all terribly exhausting in the way most movies tailored to the under-10 crowd can be.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    You’d think this chapter in Danish history would inspire passion in a native filmmaker, but the movie lacks fervency.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    The Iranian production There is No Evil (Persian title: Satan Doesn’t Exist) may not revive the portmanteau film to its former glory (the comic 1963 Italian Oscar-winning trilogy Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow being a stellar example), but it’s a comparatively solid quartet of short films that critically examine the country’s dehumanizing system of capital punishment, putting a human face on the citizen-executioner asked to carry out the all-too-frequently enacted death penalty.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    It’s a familiar template for domestic drama, particularly in its observations about traditional masculinity, but rarely – at least, in recent memory – has this type of story felt so potent or dangerous.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    Although Moffie is competently executed, its genre-straddling will leave you vaguely unsatisfied if you decide too quickly the kind of movie it should be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    While the cabaret performances are the documentary’s draw, the movie comes most alive in the interspersed interviews with servicemen and women willing to speak their minds, whether it’s about institutional racism in the military, the imperialistic siting of bases in Asia, and, of course, the ugliness of the war itself, in all of its manifestations.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    From its opening tracking shot of four furry legs sauntering through a bed of colorful pansies as cars and trucks whoosh nearby, Stray is a documentary of unhurried pleasures.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    Sin
    Renaissance man extraordinaire Michelangelo Buonarroti is frequently accused of greed in the incohesive historical drama Sin, but the only real transgression is his pride, whether it’s nurturing his own divine genius or badmouthing the mediocrity of contemporaries like Leonardo and Raphael.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    In her sophomore film, director Fastvold, assisted by painterly cinematographer André Chemetoff, has envisioned a softer version of the American frontier, still untamed but capable of hope. It’s a befitting vision of a world to come, one in which forbidden love will one day finally find its name.

Top Trailers