For 472 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Davis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Eighth Grade
Lowest review score: 0 Playing with Fire
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 99 out of 472
472 movie reviews
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    Like the jelly-bean sugar high in one of the more manic running gags, it’s all terribly exhausting in the way most movies tailored to the under-10 crowd can be.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    You’d think this chapter in Danish history would inspire passion in a native filmmaker, but the movie lacks fervency.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    The Iranian production There is No Evil (Persian title: Satan Doesn’t Exist) may not revive the portmanteau film to its former glory (the comic 1963 Italian Oscar-winning trilogy Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow being a stellar example), but it’s a comparatively solid quartet of short films that critically examine the country’s dehumanizing system of capital punishment, putting a human face on the citizen-executioner asked to carry out the all-too-frequently enacted death penalty.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    It’s a familiar template for domestic drama, particularly in its observations about traditional masculinity, but rarely – at least, in recent memory – has this type of story felt so potent or dangerous.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    Although Moffie is competently executed, its genre-straddling will leave you vaguely unsatisfied if you decide too quickly the kind of movie it should be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    While the cabaret performances are the documentary’s draw, the movie comes most alive in the interspersed interviews with servicemen and women willing to speak their minds, whether it’s about institutional racism in the military, the imperialistic siting of bases in Asia, and, of course, the ugliness of the war itself, in all of its manifestations.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    From its opening tracking shot of four furry legs sauntering through a bed of colorful pansies as cars and trucks whoosh nearby, Stray is a documentary of unhurried pleasures.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    Sin
    Renaissance man extraordinaire Michelangelo Buonarroti is frequently accused of greed in the incohesive historical drama Sin, but the only real transgression is his pride, whether it’s nurturing his own divine genius or badmouthing the mediocrity of contemporaries like Leonardo and Raphael.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    In her sophomore film, director Fastvold, assisted by painterly cinematographer André Chemetoff, has envisioned a softer version of the American frontier, still untamed but capable of hope. It’s a befitting vision of a world to come, one in which forbidden love will one day finally find its name.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    With these two actors in command, Supernova doesn’t just dare to speak the name of a love between two deeply committed men facing an untenable situation. It shouts it from the rooftops.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    Aside from Segel’s grounding performance, the pleasures of Our Friend lie in some of its observational specifics about human behavior.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    As improbable as Valerie’s endgame seems once revealed, it plainly demonstrates she’s nobody's chump. It’s not exactly a feminist reading, but one that gives Fatale a little backbone.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    The two leads are watchable enough, but the script keeps their characters emotionally separated, so you never see anything remotely like chemistry between them.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    Thanks to funding provided by Jane Fonda and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, the documentary – once thought to be lost – has been digitally restored to its original length and color quality under the supervision of Greaves’ widow. We should be grateful for this gift.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    As Monsoon unhurriedly paces towards an open-ended conclusion, you sense Kit will be in a better place than the one he occupied when he first stepped off the plane.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    Apart from the nowhere storyline devoid of any interesting character development or conflict, the movie feels vaguely exploitative.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    Every so often, a spark in Marinelli’s mesmerizing blue-gray eyes flickers and you can imagine the passion that drove the man to his madness. In those moments, Martin Eden subtly flames, if only briefly.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    The ho-hum practical jokes the two inflict upon the other can be described as Home Alone lite: No concussion-inducing swinging paint cans or burn-inducing doorknobs inspired by Looney Tunes violence here. Which, of course, takes all the fun out of it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Davis
    There’s little juicy about his life, except for maybe when he briefly left his stalwart, long-time male lover and business associate, André Oliver, for the sultry French actress, Jeanne Moreau. While House of Cardin devotes a few more than a glancing minute to this intriguing episode, perhaps it’s a worthy topic for another documentary at another time.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    Rebuilding Paradise speaks to the resiliency of human beings, and maybe something about the American can-do spirit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    Nearly three hours in length, the movie becomes an endurance test with each heartless act, relentless in its depiction of a Hobbesian state of humankind, in which life has little innate value.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 89 Steve Davis
    Director Porter has done an excellent job assembling archival footage and interviews to tell Lewis’ story; she has the markings of a great storyteller.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    This gloriously messy celebration of New Orleans’ musical legacy is a savory gumbo of uniquely American ingredients – jazz, blues, soul, rock ‘n’ roll, gospel, funk, hip-hop – generously seasoned with love and respect for the largely African-American artists who forged that heritage over the past three centuries.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    While admirably eschewing any "God’s Little Acre"-like sensationalism, the movie has little compelling dramatic energy. While the near-absence of emotional commotion doesn’t hobble Bull, there’s no question it keeps it tied down.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    Though the movie’s raison d’être is unmistakable from the outset, the most compelling moments come not when God’s name is being invoked out loud and with great frequency, but rather when the loving symbiosis between two young people facing adversity and caring for each other is tenderly communicated without uttering any words, conveyed in something as simple as the direct gaze between two pairs of locked eyes. Now that’s the notion of a higher power in which we can all believe.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Steve Davis
    It’s a scrummy omelette of a movie, a dish that’s off the menu. The ingredients are unorthodox, but they come together in an uproarious way. As a Dubliner would say, it’s absolute gas.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    At least the heroic Buck remains the focal point here, unlike in other less faithful screen incarnations that mainly trade on the familiar title.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Davis
    To its credit, Downhill strives to remain character-driven rather than devolve into a jokey take on a delicate premise.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Steve Davis
    Movies shouldn’t have to meet a PC checklist so they won’t offend – who wants that kind of cinema? – but when they poke you in the eye one too many times, it’s fair game to poke back.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Steve Davis
    Aside from the committee-written script with no coherent perspective, the trouble with Like a Boss is that it never crudely outrages. It’s a bust in so many ways. The halfhearted gender and cultural political incorrectness of Hayek’s ridiculous character makes for halfhearted laughs, and that’s being generous.

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