For 151 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Greene's Scores

Average review score: 77
Highest review score: 100 The Good Place: Season 3
Lowest review score: 42 Life Sentence: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 151
151 tv reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The success of “Shadow and Bone” Season 1 is that it works so effectively as the first installment of a potential trilogy. By the end, as the show is addressing ideas of hypermilitarization, class stratification, and the fraught nature of prophecy, it’s apparent that there’s more going on inside this season than is readily available on the surface. Here’s hoping there’s a chance for even more to shine through.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    The most recent film version of “Romeo & Juliet,” airing this week as part of PBS’ long-running “Great Performances” series, gains something profound in separating this cultural touchstone into its component parts. ... “Romeo & Juliet” is both a presentation and a kind of secret, one that’s all the more entrancing by what it chooses to leave hidden.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    Holthouse is an engaging storyteller and the series’ many animated recreation sequences effectively transport you into his investigative headspace. But when so much of his pursuit is one-sided phone calls and pixellated conversations, there’s only so much that “Sasquatch” can do before the drama seems manufactured.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    “Everything’s Gonna Be Okay” is a perfect balancing act. There’s comfort without feeling too glib. There’s introspection without becoming too self-serious. There’s true affection without losing the tension that comes with being that close to someone.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    One of the local reporters who’s been on the Gardner case beat since the beginning says that it’s been “30 years that these masterpieces have been missing. It needs a break.” “This is a Robbery” does a decent job at laying out what’s happened over those three decades — it also does a lot to prove that statement right.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The added time and the measured work from the show’s core cast help to show the full psychological toll it takes to both evade justice and to attempt to see it delivered.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    There’s the sleekness and attention to detail of “Abstract: The Art of Design” without the need or pull to burnish the subject’s credentials. It has the biographical specificity and care of “Song Exploder” while taking advantage of the fact that it’s capturing ideas that are already visual.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    So while there’s plenty of shifting around in “Back” Season 2, the humor comes from the same place: melancholy resignation to the fact that something will always be (fittingly, in the words of the new network’s slogan) slightly off.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    As inventive as “Solar Opposites” is in spurts, Season 2 shows how much the main four characters are relatively indistinguishable from each other. ... The main exception is Jesse (Mary Mack), who emerges as the main Season 2 bright spot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    The further the season goes on, the more it sheds its procedural strengths and leans toward a more overarching story that gobbles up some of the potential to get to know its main characters better. ... Still, the pieces put in place over the course of these eight episodes provide a sturdy foundation for more exploring.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Each of the opening three episodes conclude with their own little grace notes, neat bows on a new development that, again, in a multitude of other contexts would come across as treacly. By fully embracing the strengths of the show and its franchise predecessors, “Mighty Ducks: Game Changers” has already earned those moments with breakaway speed.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    If there’s one “Final Space” weakness, it’s that these early stretches take a few episodes to truly settle in to whatever the heart of the season turns out to be. But once that switch flips, it’s always a treat to see what this show manages to unleash. It’s weird and wonderful and not hemmed in by an overly referential charm.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The middle stretch of the season lags a bit in parts when the big-picture ideas don’t exactly line up with these individual, isolated incidents. When the built-in advantage of a show is the necessity for conciseness, those chapters don’t necessarily drag down the show’s overall potency. But when “Calls” is locked in, it’s an especially effective slice of horror. That usually comes when the show sticks to the “less is more” side of things.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    It’s surprising to see how much “Staged” Season 2 is a natural build on the first six episodes. The “American remake” structure is a little too high concept at times, but Evans manages to find ways to follow through on those ideas of confronting a past career and being forced to define success in new ways.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Like the best “Last Chance U” seasons, this collection of ELAC episodes strikes a nice balance between highlighting school staff and these players trying to plan for their respective futures.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Sometimes a series like this is only as good as its lucky breaks. In this case, the Heaven descendants and Minden lifers bring a distinct energy to the show, peppering each historical overview and family legend with plenty of good-natured jabs and hearty recollections.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    There’s rarely a time in “For All Mankind” where these big swings are unwelcome, but the show still has a little more to go before all its storytelling tools are calibrated to deliver the kind of imagination it so clearly (and, often, thankfully) has.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    Much like the dilemma faced by its main character, this is a spry half-hour comedy trapped inside the body of an hourlong series too expansive too early for its own good. Still, despite the elements that sometimes drag it down, Tudyk and those most locked into the energies of the show’s funnier side are enough to keep you curious about where Harry ends up.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Anchored by a couple of tremendous performances, “Losing Alice” can take an evocative color palette, a well-placed camera, and a few gentle moves to unlock some genuine uncertainty and anxiety. Watching this show is watching a handful of characters try to keep a grasp on their own story. There’s a real potency in seeing that not even they know when they’re successful or not.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    What’s remarkable is how much of that bouncy, vibrant spirit this series is able to retain [of the previous version] while also bucking some of the expectations shows of its kind are usually saddled with.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    This is Scorsese’s version of forwarding you an email with a link and insisting that, trust him, you just gotta read it. When viewed in full, this can’t help but feel more of a curio than a passion project for either of its main contributors. Still, those who share either of this pair’s love for the city or their views on its gradual evolution will likely enjoy the opportunity for time spent in their virtual company.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Even with the protomolecule saga relatively sidelined this season, “The Expanse” draws so much strength from exposing how fragile an expansive society like this is.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    If only more of this show had the visual and narrative daring to take what it posits as a Trial of the Decade and push beyond what’s a matter of public record. But as it is, it still harnesses the innate momentum of the scandal that preceded it and spins a tale that becomes a canvas for whatever you want to bring to help fill in.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    At each point in the season when Suzie is faced with a pivotal decision, part of what makes “I Hate Suzie” fascinating is that both paths forward for her seem plausible. For every self-destructive leaning, there’s an equally viable route that won’t erase her past mistakes altogether, but at least will be a step towards alleviating the damage they’ve caused. That this show can present both options and still generate understanding for Suzie — regardless of where she goes next — is an effective trick to pull off.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Fortunately, there’s enough warmth and empathy in “We Are the Champions” to keep the final product a well-intentioned look at what powers some of the odder corners of human achievement.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    “The Reagans” is largely conventional in its structure. So while the series is compact and has a clear set of theses on the efficacy of his policies and the lasting effects of key rhetorical choices, there is a matching metanarrative in its very existence.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    “The Cost of Winning” barrels forward at such a quick pace that most of those chances to get to know them as people rather than players feel rushed.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    The narrative tightness of the story is never at odds with its diligent pacing. That combination allows each player in this expanding world to feel like they belong. The final chapter of “Save Me Too” is both a logical endpoint and a pathway to continuing. It’s a constant strength of this show that it’s filled with the kind of moments where other series would be content to bow out.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Like those often caught in the crosshairs, not every choice is a successful one, but there’s always something intriguing in seeing someone trying to navigate the impossible.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Up through the series’ parting sequence, which squares one individual’s punishment with a moment of self-reflection, “Tiger King” manages to tell an electrifying story with an open mind, a shrewd eye, and a delicate touch.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    “How To” is filled with the kind of unexpected surprises that lead to belly laughs rather than gasps. Out of context, some of the ways that these episode topics connect to wider-reaching metaphors would seem saccharine or forced. But in the hands of Wilson and co-writers Michael Koman and Alice Gregory, there’s an earned earnestness to how this all plays out. There’s a certain strain of comforting self-awareness as “How To” connects the dots to those heartfelt conclusions the only way it can.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    It’s surprising “neXt” ends up with as much potential as it has. Clearly, no one has any idea what the coming months will bring, so the more that “neXt” sticks to what it can control, the better off it should fare.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Steve Greene
    So many of the characters in “Soulmates” are looking for trust. That search would mean more if the show around them had a little bit more of it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    From his lengthy opening monologue through his emotional final scene, Harington is the addition to this season’s cast that’s giving a performance that seems more suited to the rhythms of the stage. The remaining three find better ways in Season 2 to take full advantage of the subtleties that Jim Field Smith’s direction can afford.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Luckily, the signature “Archer” connective joke tissue that melds its disparate plots with bookending conversations is as sharp as ever, too. Archer’s jealousy, Cyril’s struggles to command respect, and Cheryl’s turn-ons should be territory so well-trod that no fertile ground would be left. Yet, there’s enough magic in each passing setup that you get a chance to see these from a new angle.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Marnie has her momentary breakthroughs, but the show manages to remind her (and everyone watching) that with mental health, fixating on an unequivocal solution is a counterproductive approach. The show gives the space to let Marnie figure things out in tiny incremental chunks, even when a giant breakthrough might be easier to hang an episode or a season on.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Greene
    The pieces are there to make something that actually conveys a greater appreciation of what went into building these dominant cultural forces, to fill in that mystery gap between a revolutionary idea and plenty of dollar signs. But investigating that insightful middle ground just isn’t one of this show’s objectives.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    As both sisters start to explore the assumptions they’ve been handed about who’s worthy of respect and how they should act on their impulses, the piecemeal approach to nabbing people who’ve skipped out on bail doesn’t quite hold the same weight. Yet in those moments when all these disparate elements do click into place, there’s more than enough onscreen energy to want to see where Blair and Sterling’s stories head next.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Greene
    For a show with an occasionally impressive exterior (the interplay between Klaus and Ben gets an impressive-looking added wrinkle), the emotional heartbeat underneath is largely absent. Part of that comes from being stretched thin enough that characters without a well-established core are often left flailing, but it’s mostly due to the show’s continued affinity for the reset button.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    There’s an element in this season of “Frayed” getting all its pieces in place. The closing moments of the finale feel like both the logical culmination of episodes’ worth of careful buildup and a gateway to an exciting chapter if the story continues. If it follows the steady path it’s already plotted out, “Frayed” has all the makings of something really special.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    “Last Chance U” finds success in taking its cues from the people in frame. Rather than try to graft on a predetermined narrative, directors Whiteley and Daniel McDonald, along with DP Terry Zumalt, try to take in a season that’s not sensational and that can move at the players’ pace.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    The anxiety that marks the show is here channeled toward embracing the way weirdness and stupidity seem to blanket the realities of corporate life. In finding new ways to torque these office mainstays, “Corporate” has given the rest of the Hampton DeVille team plenty of ways to transform some of that simmering rage of previous seasons into a kind of office-centered goofiness. Lance Reddick remains an episode-to-episode comedic powderkeg.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    “Hanna” finds space in Season 2 for a flurry of fantastic performances that fill out the murky, grey area surrounding Hanna herself. Where the show used to feel like two blunt objects rammed together in different cities around Europe, this season is a more artful balancing act.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Even with all that uncertainty, “Dark” has maintained that highwire act for three of the most thrilling sci-fi TV seasons ever made. To see it make it across the chasm with its ambitions and technique intact is certainly something worth remembering.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Though this special still has more jokes per minute than just about any other show on TV, one tradeoff of this doubled runtime is that there aren’t quite as many blink-and-you-miss-it gags as in the regular episodes. But the core idea of having jokes in as many forms as possible still holds. Salahuddin is still a pro at delivering a punchline under his breath. ... If this “Black History Month Spectacular” proves anything, it’s that this is a show with both a timelessness and specificity to thrive in any era.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    With so much of the tonal groundwork taken care of by that first episode, each new attempt to go back to that well gets less and less shocking. ... Yet, even when those people around Patrick seem thin, it’s the voice work on the show that becomes another saving grace.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The show isn’t as comprehensive in its scope as it might be intending at points, but there’s still plenty of fertile storytelling ground where it does focus its attention.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    It takes all the messiness of affection and heartache and loss and instead of affording it to a central couple dealing with someone on the outside, it treats these three characters as partners each worthy of attention in their own way. Like any good relationship, it’s hard work. But there’s enough communication between characters (and between the storyteller and audience) to build something special.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Where most historical fiction seems like it’s arcing toward some grand thesis statement of a fixed point in time, “Barkskins” is just as much about foreshadowing the problems of the resulting generations as it is capturing a bygone moment. It might not always lead to the tidiest, easy-to-wrangle storytelling, but it ends up reflecting its time and our current one in a way these kinds of shows are not always able.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    This is a show that rarely takes its time. Watching things escalate from tiny misunderstandings to disasters threatening to destroy a city or reconstitute the fabric of timespace is this show’s sweet spot.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Greene
    “Upload” feels like a spiritual tug-of-war between a handful of thinly sketched starting points that never coalesce into anything significant.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The first four episodes of this opening season definitely have their charms — Jason’s meet-up with an ex to try to heal some open emotional wounds has some unexpected push-pull moments — the back half is really where “Trying” settles into a groove.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Most comedy specials arrive fully formed. “Middleditch & Schwartz” gives you the joy of working things out together.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    “The Last Dance” isn’t necessarily an evidence-gathering operation, but as the series goes on, the input from teammates, coaches, and members of the Jordan inner circle all seem to ask whether the outcome of June 1998 was worth all the turmoil. For many viewers lifted by the way “The Last Dance” captures the sweep of history, the likely answer will be “yes.”
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    Even when the plot machinations later in the season grow exponentially more designed for maximum stakes, there’s still enough goodwill built up in the show’s opening chapters to see how the crew sees their way past a mounting list of obstacles.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    The result is a straightforward, few-frills retelling of the web of conversations that ensnared Dawkins and led to the charging of a number of his regular collaborators from inside college teams and apparel companies alike.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Season 4 finds the ideal line between evoking both the debauchery of his past and squaring one man’s outsized legend with his more understanding current form.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    “Dirty Money” episodes tend to function as cleanly produced explainers, recounting chapters from the recent past while nodding to their ramifications in the present. Whenever the show has an opportunity to roust itself from the more clinical on-camera interviews and chart firsthand some of these aftereffects, there’s a sharper final product.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    The most valuable part of “Cosmos: Possible Worlds” is its merging of boundless optimism and the necessity of urgency.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Greene
    Fluffy and safe, it’s not the strongest endorsement of what the rest of the series might bring. (At the time of this writing, no additional episodes were made available to press.)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    The main issue is that so much of what the show presents of them are their surface-level emotions, not the characters themselves. By Episodes 4 and 5, the selectively hidden parts of not just Paul and Ally’s relationship but their past individual histories do float to the surface. The question is if audiences will stick around long enough for those breadcrumbs to guide their way out of the cold.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    As the show’s emotional swings match Syd’s various states, Lillis provides the necessary bridge between them. ... In the rare moments when Syd, Dina, and Stan get the chance to operate as a group, there’s a glimmer of what the show could be if it moves beyond these first seven chapters. Even when they’re split apart, “I Am Not Okay With This” exists in a comfortable cross-section of pace and scope that gives Syd’s story the breathing room it needs.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    “Babies” is akin to watching a documentary about falling in love that spotlights couples but also leans primarily on the testimony of dating app experts. There’s a story to tell there, but the priorities seem skewed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The show’s best energy and ability to subvert expectations of a show set in this time and place is evident right from the pilot. Even still, there’s a sense that this series’ best moments could still be ahead of it. ... What’s on offer right now from “Year of the Rabbit” is a chance to see some very gifted performers add a goofy curveball to the London of centuries past.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Viewers expecting a tight, compact album might be pleasantly surprised to see this season take on a more open-ended Spotify playlist feel, designed to keep playing and be enjoyed knowing that the end is still far in the future. At times, it’s an eclectic mix of ideas and execution, but there’s a great amount of satisfaction in just letting it all wash over you.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    These new episodes show how both the construction of the character and Pullman’s performance are a foundation worth building on again and again.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Aside from a few orienting establishing shots here and there, many of these episodes commit so fully to this alien approach that it’s a legitimate surprise to be snapped back to reality when more traditional looks at various creatures start to sneak through. ... It scratches the human need to be reminded that there is more left to discover, that there are still some quasi-mystical elements of nature that science has barely had a chance to observe, much less explain.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    “Everything’s Gonna Be Okay” has an infectious, energetic momentum to it. ... There’s enough of a sturdy foundation of what this family is to each other that seeing them take turns as the show’s driving force gives the series some well-deserved wonder.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    This show is probably best enjoyed dipping in for a little bit and coming back after a recharge. The joy of “Medical Police” is in the surprise. So even though you could watch all 10 of these episodes back-to-back, it’s better in smaller doses. That continuous element of surprise comes from seeing when “Medical Police” picks and chooses its moments of subversion.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    From head coach Monica Aldama to flyer Lexi to stunt base Jerry, there’s an effort made to understand these people as people, not just a product of what they’re able to do on the confines of the mat. In almost all cases, “Cheer” leads with showing what they’re capable of, then pulling back to show the people from their hometown or in their Navarro world that helped make them who they are.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    When the main source of drama is unclear intentions or mixed signals, “Dare Me” wears its hazy, dreamlike exterior well. As the season progresses and those nightmares become a little more literal, the cuts between hallucinations and reality become slightly less effective. But when that disorienting, who-to-believe framework gets reflected from multiple angles, “Dare Me” truly delivers.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Continuing the tradition of thoughtfully outlining a system-wide conflict while following through a portal to countless untold problems, “The Expanse” is an evolving text that an increased sense of scale has only made richer.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    It plays on all five senses, asking the people watching to disengage in ten-minute chunks. It’s a regularly soothing experience and a valuable reminder.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    Those looking for verisimilitude may find some in “The Accident,” but getting through to the conclusion, it’s still murky what all of that on-screen suffering services.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    “Edge of Tomorty” feel[s] like a way of, like Morty, the show asserting that it has its own say in where it gets to go and how long it takes to get there.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    It might be told with training wheels at first, but by the end it hands over the keys to the shoob-shubbler to anyone who wants to take the journey.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Greene
    It takes a few episodes to break free from rehashes of well-worn stories: unfaithful and distant spouses, unruly kids, interfamily envy. Every character on this show is saddled with an initial, perfunctory purpose. It’s only with the benefit of hours spent with them that more dynamic parts of their corner of this galactic web get to emerge — and that’s too long to wait.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    “Daybreak” wears its influences while marrying them to something distinct and of the present moment. ... “Daybreak” may telegraph a few of its biggest surprises, but the path getting to those revelations includes some wild left-field swings that its cast pulls off with glee.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Whether it’s a simmering threat or one delivered at gunpoint, “Impulse” still keeps its sense of danger present at every turn. When that uncertainty pushes Henry and those in her immediate orbit towards a fresh understanding of their circumstances, the show is better for it. “Impulse” has laid out a few different pathways to its bigger picture. Now, it’s just a matter of jumping toward one.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    Through the lens of two characters, a man and a dinosaur, “Primal” is a piece of elemental storytelling that finds some real emotional depth without either of its protagonists uttering a single word of dialogue.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Getting past the easy signifiers to what really distinguishes David’s and Kristen’s (or Ben’s or Leland’s) views on their intended subjects will help give those characters — and the viewers who follow them — better answers. Even if those perspectives are different, it’s the discussions of those diverging ideas of obligation, morality, and belief that separate this from recent shows that have tried to bring religious ideas into a mainstream offering. So far, it’s an admirable attempt, if sometimes overly simplistic. If there’s a willingness to go further, there are deeper mysteries waiting to be explored.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    The way the show has already executed its first case offers plenty of hope. Much like the promise of Dex having something to call her own, “Stumptown” looks like it can carve out its own space in the greater network hourlong world. With a wink, a chuckle, and balled up fist at the ready if need be, Dex is a character that could very well stick around for a while.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    For its running time, Burns effectively steers this wagon across country music’s diverging timelines. It’s only in retrospect that “Country Music” raises questions beyond the answers its historical sweep can offer.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    It’s often easy to spot the visual and performance tricks “Room 104” can pull off. Toying with your expectations is still its greatest flourish.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Greene
    It’s a show with certainly admirable ambitions, but through nearly every aspect of its swirling narrative, “Carnival Row” is less than the sum of its otherworldly parts.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    As much Season 2 plays with the true meaning of “alchemy,” this show seems to already know the secret.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Presenting all of these testimonies without tipping the scale towards one person’s guilt or innocence is a tall task, one that “No One Saw a Thing” deftly manages to do over the course of its six episodes. In the process though, there’s a certain atmospheric quality to this portrait of Skidmore that doesn’t always have a forward momentum to it. ... But “No One Saw a Thing” arrives at some fascinating conclusions when it pulls back its own documentary facade just a little bit.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    There’s a playfulness in the way that the first episode downplays the cash prize and hypes up the Masters-esque jacket that goes to each winner. And there a few goofy details in the construction of the course itself (like the handle of the inexplicable zipline being an actual golf club) that point to a show that’s more concerned with giving people a good time than determining true athletic prowess.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    It’s a relief, then, to see the show in Season 2 stop to take its breath to really check in on what’s happening elsewhere. Cowboy (Steven Williams), the latest addition to the collection of ranch hands, helps bring some additional understanding of the structure and day-to-day functioning of life on Yellowstone Ranch.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Season 3 works to bring up the supporting cast to Brockmire’s level, but the rising tide starts to lift all quirks. When people from his past make their reentry into his orbit, it’s not enough that they have to return; they bring outsized relationship problems with them that distract from the meaningful advances in human connection that the show has spent time fostering. Then again, if the show has to live in a heightened state, it’s found a groove in letting Brockmire be a one-liner geyser.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Neither a proselytizing exercise for any one sports league or a harbinger of doom for the industry overall, Action is more of an accounting of where things stand at the precipice of a major change. It’s also a case study in perspective: Gambling inherently brings with it a rise and fall.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    By focusing on less-heralded sources of sports drama, the show illustrates how these stories resonate with the people who represent not just a team or a town, but an entire sport. Duzyj’s history as an animator brings a distinct visual style to how these various stories unfold. Even in the most disappointing moments, there is an energy to the animated sequences that rises above a simple documentary gimmick.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Carmen Sandiego continues the tradition of educational entertainment, but the show has lessons beyond a textbook. It offers an implicit crash course in espionage thriller parlance and conventions, all while giving younger viewers an educational gateway to a bigger world.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Greene
    Whereas similar shows have ended with a tidy conclusion, these kind of investigative dramas are richer for going beyond the backstory of a single crime to explore how much it continues to resonate long after the story ends.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Greene
    With its shiny, colorful exteriors and bathed-in-light church sequences, there’s a glossy sheen to much of "God Friended Me." The test going forward is if it’s willing to dig beneath it.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Steve Greene
    Season 3 opens up with a quartet of episodes that confirms that this group of cast and writers is equipped to make this story work wherever and whenever things may lead.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    911 is constantly operating at such a high emotional level that it would take something really drastic to make a severe challenge for everyone involved. Lucky for them, that snaking line of cracked pavement looks like the chance for them to do just that. The real test, though, is what 911 is ready to do when the dust settles.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Steve Greene
    Even though Howery is saddled with having to be the standard sitcom protagonist around which the rest of the show revolves, it still offers him a chance to indulge in the crowd-pleasing charms that made him a “Get Out” breakout.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Steve Greene
    It may take a little longer to get there than last time, but this new season becomes a worthy follow-up by not only swapping out one anatomical gag for another, but by filing off some of its goofier edges for another grounded look at the other daily challenges of high school life.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Steve Greene
    Through Glendyn Ivin’s direction and scripts from Belinda Chayko, Matt Cameron, and Phil Enchelmaier, Safe Harbour is a sharp story about the short- and long-term consequences of miscommunication.

Top Trailers