Tomris Laffly

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For 187 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tomris Laffly's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Assistant
Lowest review score: 0 Roe v. Wade
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 21 out of 187
187 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    Delivering an unforgettable breakthrough performance, Abita is phenomenal in pitching Lyz on the slippery slope between an adult wannabe and a little kid, boldly wearing even the smallest nuances of her character’s rapidly shifting emotional world on her resolute face.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Tomris Laffly
    While it hardly breaks new ground, The Man Who Sold His Skin still manages to be a breezy watch, with an assured filmmaker gently steering it through a rough-around-the-edges tale.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 0 Tomris Laffly
    Ideologically scheming and visually inelegant, this is truly tacky stuff.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Tomris Laffly
    The whole experience feels like a generic inventory of recognizable tropes—the possessed child, the creepy old woman, the deeply-concerned priests, and the Ouija board are all here. Except, the cumulative fear bizarrely fizzles before it reaches something significant or emotionally meaningful.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Tomris Laffly
    It’s a rewarding experience to watch Izzo thread a tricky line with ease here, emitting both a child-like innocence and gradual steeliness that slowly yet convincingly sharpens and matures. If only the film could deserve her level of commitment.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Tomris Laffly
    Here, the effects are purposely on the cheap (they will make you giggle) and the acting is deliberately over the top. Once you accept these quirks, there's some blood-spattered pleasure to be had with Slaxx and its amusing twist on a survive-the-night slasher.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Tomris Laffly
    This is a film that chooses to keep things crisp and feather-light. And there is nothing wrong with the movie equivalent of a modestly happy floral cologne you’d splash on for a little daytime pick-me-up.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Tomris Laffly
    Burns doesn’t delve into Sarah’s emotional psyche as deeply as one craves throughout Come True. The somewhat maddening twist ending—more a copout than genuinely earned—excuses some of that misstep, but only artificially so.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Tomris Laffly
    My Salinger Year sometimes drags and falters with questionable tonal shifts. But it’s never a complete waste of time to witness a young woman grow into her voice on her own terms, especially when her canvas is this cinematic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Tomris Laffly
    It’s a welcome entry into a familiar genre that will resonate with young audiences burdened by the unwritten rules of their respective educational institutions. And that’s thanks in large part to an immensely likable ensemble cast guided by Poehler’s sure-handed energy behind the camera, as well as the film’s ambitious aims to be intersectional in its social and political themes.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Tomris Laffly
    In a lot of ways, Crisis is a classic example of a movie that wants to be a little bit of everything, only to add up to a much lesser version of something you keep waiting to see.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Tomris Laffly
    Neither as sweet or profound as the fanciful American indies like Ghost World that clearly inspired it, nor all that insightful in its interpretation of a single mother’s universal struggles, Bagnold Summer is sadly a forgettable film, often too ironically close to being the kind of bore its central character Daniel’s accidental summer in the English suburbs threatens to be.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Tomris Laffly
    You long for something evocative and warm throughout The World to Come, only to leave it with a minor shiver.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Tomris Laffly
    It’s curiously difficult to stay engaged with Mock’s film that merely puts forth a paint-by-numbers assembly of the wealth of material it has at its disposal.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Tomris Laffly
    Beckwith puts forth something rare and full of feeling. This is a genuine love story between two straight individuals of the opposite sex that doesn’t involve sex (let’s call it friendship for kicks), an insightful redefinition of masculinity as well as a gentle, intimate celebration of a unique, 21st-century family in the making.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Tomris Laffly
    R#J
    Even the most eagle-eyed and engaged viewers might run out of patience with R#J. Thankfully, Williams’ magnificent cast counters the disorder with their confident screen presence and theatrical muscles that stand out within the film’s unique atmosphere.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Tomris Laffly
    Horror is most effective when the graphic scares are matched with an emotional dimension, something at which Ellis aims but doesn’t quite arrive — a shortcoming that also undersells the marvels of his first-rate ensemble cast.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Tomris Laffly
    Sweet and personal, How It Ends is hardly an entertaining movie, or one that will go down as one of the defining films of these unpredictably strange times. But you can’t really blame the artists for trying to make some therapeutic sense of it all, with a little help from one another.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Tomris Laffly
    While it doesn’t measure up to some of the director’s greatest such as “In Darkness” and “Washington Square,” Spoor makes an unmistakable political statement nonetheless, with Holland’s lens capturing the heart and soul of the animals some of the film’s despicable characters cruelly disregard.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Tomris Laffly
    While the filmmaker tries to neatly bring the complex tale to a close in its final minutes, it feels like a different story takes off at the conclusion of Ciorniciuc’s compact 80-something minutes; one that would encompass new jobs, a newborn, distressingly uncertain prospects, and even higher-than-before stakes in the midst of an unforgiving urban jungle.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Tomris Laffly
    Throughout the mostly wordless “Stray,” we wonder with compassion and considerable self-critique whom the society uplifts and supports vs. whom it chooses to disregard and deem invisible.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Tomris Laffly
    Sylvie’s Love feels downright rebellious, daring to exist with its unapologetic old-fashioned quality at a time when many maddeningly seem to dismiss honest-to-god romances and proud women’s pictures as slight and outdated.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Tomris Laffly
    Ultimately, the only respectable thing that remains consistent throughout The Stand In is the beguiling appeal Barrymore brings to both of the personalities, even though neither of them is particularly likable.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Tomris Laffly
    A slow burn, sometimes to a fault, I’m Your Woman proudly revives a type of old-fashioned cinema with something new to say.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Tomris Laffly
    Bakhshi’s sure-handed assessment of Iran’s class struggle, a thoughtfully-parsed topic with universal implications, is the film’s most fascinating dimension.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Tomris Laffly
    It’s an acutely observed you-are-there procedural about a modern metropolis that dares to exist, even thrive amid the enduring repercussions of 1967’s Six-Day War, when Israel occupied the region.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Tomris Laffly
    It’s never a good sign when characters in a film promptly declare: we are aware you are watching and we’re here to teach you a thing or two.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Tomris Laffly
    In writer/director Chad Faust’s Girl — a wobbly and desperately unimaginative mesh-up of contemporary noir and a Southern-fried tale of ancestral trouble — Thorne continues to broaden her range, serving up a quiet performance of emotional burden and impressive physicality.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Tomris Laffly
    Freaky is a fun, frisky, and nostalgic ride that delivers laughs, various inventively bloody kills, and on occasion, even some 21st-century-appropriate observations on gender norms and sexuality. Just don’t expect to be surprised a great deal by it.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Tomris Laffly
    The angst it spreads throughout feels all too mild and forgettable to cast an unnerving curse. You know, the kind you’d crave from a horror film with lasting scares.

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