Troy Patterson

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For 279 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Troy Patterson's Scores

Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Planet Earth: Blue Planet II
Lowest review score: 0 Roseanne's Nuts: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 45 out of 279
279 tv reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Troy Patterson
    As it is, the many excellent small performances in “When They See Us” feel especially small because of the series’ ambitious sweep. There are a lot of full characters here, but we only get partial views of them, and the interplay between the poetic evocations of these individual souls and the grand indictment of the criminal-justice system is rarely as compelling as one might like.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    The adaptation is often rote and merely serviceable. Some scenes are inspired in their brutality, but this “Catch-22” seems, incongruously, to want to inspire its audience.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    The narrowness of the show helps it wear its drawing-room lightness well, and it is littered with tiny delights.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Troy Patterson
    The full thing on Netflix, framed as the fruit of artistic striving, may come close to achieving its epic ambitions, but it’s too soon to tell—the verdict won’t be in until a whole generation of children, homeschooling themselves on its choreography, have come of age.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    The episodes do not prove uniformly coherent, but they do reward close scrutiny.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    A jolly spoof of demonic gloom.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    The virtues of The Act are often distinct from the details of its dramatic arc. It’s more a ready-made parable of toxic parenthood or a mass-cultural case study than a thriller. ... Arquette’s Dee Dee combines vigilant motherhood, complicated victimhood, and complete monstrosity. The character will be remembered as an icon of our era of grift, alongside the antiheroes of “Fyre Fraud,” “The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley,” and “The Apprentice.”
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    The slightness and lightness are soothing, in this quiet-storm remix of a sitcom pastiche. You feel that he has been wise enough to delight in the foolishness of Charlie’s situation, and you feel charmed to be let in on his boondoggle.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    The show, like the snack, is salty and slightly sweet, and its crispness is a sign of its authenticity.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Troy Patterson
    The professional challenges that Robyn faces are often plausible, and far more compelling than their resolutions, which are mostly stupid. Flack has little to say about celebrity culture with its stories of contrived sex tapes, hushed-up face-lifts, sham marriages, and bogus redemption narratives. ... The show gets somewhat less uninteresting around the fifth episode, which is set in the business-class cabin of a transatlantic flight and proves an intriguingly creepy role for Bradley Whitford.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    It’s a heartfelt, crackpot homage, with an independent creative vision.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    It may surprise you to hear that this programming is gripping. ... This shamefully tasty hate-watch is also a study in human nature, a fine lowbrow opportunity both to marvel at the masks we put on and to examine how and why they crack.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Troy Patterson
    The show is all over the place: it’s sharp when squinting at absurdity, juvenile when diarrhea jokes plop to the fore, sappy when it spares a moment to cherish the mystery and majesty of creation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Troy Patterson
    The adults’ performances are so committed as to erase the sense of difference. With the precise physicality of their hallway trudges and great shades of meaning in their many outbursts of “Oh, my God!,” the leads balance glorious caricature and subtle evocation. ... Where “Sex Education” offers a lot of easy answers to the embarrassments of puberty, “PEN15” loiters amid its difficult mysteries and discovers an embarrassment of riches.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Troy Patterson
    It renders Don Cornelius (Sinqua Walls), the creator and host of “the hippest trip in America,” as an archetypal entrepreneur, and pushes the existential overtones of his striving to the front of the mix. ... The agonies of the secondary characters--the aspiring dancers and anguished assistants and shady scenesters--range from social melodrama to crime melodrama, from buppie-career-angst melodrama to escape-from-South Central melodrama.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    It takes great skill to be so soothing, especially when herky-jerky absurdity is the basis of one’s act. Ovaltine is delicious, and O’Brien has found its ideal serving size.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Troy Patterson
    Pine’s lightness mitigates a lot of paint-by-number murk in the course of this miniseries--six episodes of louche noir, mildly feverish nonsense, and murder-mystery comfort food. ... Despite the absence of a badge, Singletary might be the truest detective on television. There’s a refreshing honesty to his trashiness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    Created by Chris Kelly and Sarah Schneider, The Other Two has a melancholy and an off-kilter kindness that undergird its cutting jokes and rude gags. ... The show, in its daffy way, is in tune with both the routine disgraces and great degradations of our age.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    It’s a crisp political-messaging procedural, outlining a triumph of data over knowledge and tribal fear over human reason. ... Brexit is nicely ambiguous as to whether Cummings is a misguided genius or simply a talented opportunist, and Cumberbatch is excellent at conveying the lonely monomania of a man stubbornly devoted to principles that only he recognizes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Troy Patterson
    The Jammer Group would be nothing without the skill of Dawn Darcy, who is Maurice’s top lieutenant and former girlfriend. The same might be said of the show’s reliance on the actor in the role, Regina Hall. ... Dawn functions as the conscience of the show: she groans at the Challenger line before the audience can, and she articulates our objections to the nonsensicality of the plot. Still, she’s just a den mother. Cleaning up this crassness is janitorial work--it’s beneath her to manage such toxic assets.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Troy Patterson
    Valley of the Boom abounds with self-aware asides and fanciful fillips, and these are variously pandering, bizarre, and endearing. ... Where McKay’s scenes [in "The Big Short"] clarify, these tend to confuse and clutter. ... The show has no particular ambition to draw its characters as people. Rather, they are figures of Wild West lore and common cliché.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Troy Patterson
    The show never allows logic to get in the way of a good riff, or a bad one. This is, for better or worse, a going style of comedy, which has the shape of biting satire but no teeth.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Troy Patterson
    The thorough unfunniness of the season validates the judgment of viewers who were immediately drawn to its cast and subsequently repelled by its everything else. .... It is uneasy about taking itself seriously. The problem is that it can’t take itself ridiculously either.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Troy Patterson
    The show is decent company if you’re just sitting there folding the laundry, and you will be folding it with unprecedented panache--conveying “love to your clothes from the palms of your hands,” Kondo says--if you follow her teachings. Tidying Up is mindless television on the topic of mindful domesticity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Troy Patterson
    The new “True Detective” is faintly pretentious, manageably ridiculous, and dull. ... Throughout his terrific performance as this emotionally wounded warrior, Ali steams and simmers and smolders with repressed emotion. The display of heat is all the more remarkable because the script sheds little light on Hays’s inner self.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    Patricia Arquette’s excellence as Tilly is the strongest selling point of a show where the points of an unsurprising plotline are subordinate to a memorable intensity of performances.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    Beneath the show’s heavy coats of operatic varnish and prestige-TV enamel, it demonstrates a humble tenderness. In the specifics of its plot and the essence of its tone, the adaptation is faithful, though not slavishly so.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Troy Patterson
    Three episodes into this seven-part season, it remains unclear what all this horrible awkwardness and explosions of bowels add up to--how much art can be found in the squicky craft of an evil clown.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    Where [Sally4Ever's] Sally’s crisis outrageously flowers into absurdity, Leila’s is the basis for a droll study of friendship and desire, with tenderness in its millennial moping, and emotional depth to its embarrassing emotional pratfalls.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Troy Patterson
    Season 1 of Homecoming supplies two fine roles to Julia Roberts--or, rather, one superb role, that of the disappointed American hero Heidi Bergman, on two time lines. ... Every episode of Homecoming, each crisp half-hour installment, is a compact exploitation film, spinning an anxious yarn about systematic abuse.

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