User Score
7.2

Mixed or average reviews- based on 201 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 29 out of 201

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  1. Jul 10, 2016
    3
    Broken Age is a wonderfully crafted and creative point and click graphic novel coupled with superb voice acting, however, that is all it is. While the first act of the game is fairly immersive, employing a variety of different riddles and problems for the player to solve whilst discovering an amusing world, the second act is much more disjointed and fails to deliver in both gameplay andBroken Age is a wonderfully crafted and creative point and click graphic novel coupled with superb voice acting, however, that is all it is. While the first act of the game is fairly immersive, employing a variety of different riddles and problems for the player to solve whilst discovering an amusing world, the second act is much more disjointed and fails to deliver in both gameplay and storyline. The gameplay increasingly becomes more and more monotonous, having the player backtrack to and from the same areas again and again and again, on a goose chase to either click on something that the player was given almost no direction whatsoever to click on. Honestly, though it was a point and click adventure, I feel like it still could have delivered given the quality of the characters and environment. The direction of the storyline and gameplay is what fails to deliver. Expand
  2. Sep 24, 2016
    4
    Maybe I‘m too thick or perhaps we just don’t click like we used to? Either way, some puzzles in Broken Age were tough as nails.

    It’s a thoughtful and imaginative game but in equal measure, a chore wrought in guess work, cluttered with poorly realised puzzles whose inventiveness seems hazardous to their own brilliance. A staple of gaming in the late 80s and a decent chunk of the 90s,
    Maybe I‘m too thick or perhaps we just don’t click like we used to? Either way, some puzzles in Broken Age were tough as nails.

    It’s a thoughtful and imaginative game but in equal measure, a chore wrought in guess work, cluttered with poorly realised puzzles whose inventiveness seems hazardous to their own brilliance.

    A staple of gaming in the late 80s and a decent chunk of the 90s, point-and-click adventures have always existed on one solid foundation: player satisfaction. Pioneers Lucas Arts and Sierra both nailed this mechanic and the smug realization when you stopped and exited the Tunnel of Love in Sam & Max Hit the Road or the gratifying way Space Quest IV lectured you for cursing (“what would your mother think”?) are no accident, but perfect examples of impetus driven almost entirely by ‘the eureka moment’. It’s these mini epiphanies that make all that pointing and clicking worthwhile, as ‘the point’, as far as the player can tell, is to be rewarded for their troubles.

    It’s a pity then when the re-birth of the genre, helmed by one its most beloved figureheads, fails not only to re-capture former glory but quite radically regress it – eliminating the logic and signposting (subtle in-game hints helping guide the player to a defined conclusion) that had helped give the point-and-click such a unique and intellectual essence.

    This lack of logic can be found all throughout Broken Age’s 4-6 hour lifespan but is most damning in the latter half of the game, when things really start to hit the fan. Cat-hair moustache bad? I won’t tar it with that brush but it’s well on its way.

    At this point in the story the player is asked to craft a makeshift hole-patch material from combination disgusting man-made broth and eggshell. Sure it sounds great but the path to the solution is far from rewarding.

    The goal here is to afford the slop a pH level of 9 so it can be used to patch up a spaceship. Figuring you have to plumb the depths of the purple-grey mess with your talking spoon (it makes a certain amount of sense in context), you’re told the pH is 7. A basic chat with your dad, the mastermind behind this plan, has you learn the acidic materials will lower the pH, whilst dropping in anything highly alkaline (say, a shell) will raise it. Alright – I’ll just drop in this shell I got earlier. “Just a minute” says Shay, one the game’s two main characters, “that’s a shell-shaped instrument, not a shell”. Here’s where the real fun begins…

    Depending on your capacity for arbitrary inventory mashing, the next 30 minutes to an hour of gameplay will see you traipsing backdrops, attempting to combine a fish with a snake and growing steadily more frustrated as you attempt to solve this bastard of a riddle. Through nothing more than process of elimination, the solution finally becomes clear – use the juice tapper from the guy in the tree to crack the egg of the bird that had previously attacked you every time you went near it, let alone when you tried to smash up its kid’s house with a blunt instrument. There’s no flow here nor reason and this laziness garnishes the whole game – the player asked to exhaust all possibilities before proceeding.

    Though dotted with imagination and some genuine fun, the elaborate and seemingly random nature of Broken Age distills it to nothing more than a disappointing irony, cruel in its purpose and choice of moniker. In attempting to recapture the inventiveness of its predecessors, its ambition has tipped the balance and now has it nowt more than a frustrating exercise in developer telepathy.

    Space Quest, Sam & Max or Monkey Island this game certainly isn’t, though it can now share a shelf with Assassin's Creed Unity and the Masterchief Collection as a herald of the broken Age (with apologies given to Broken Sword).
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  3. Aug 19, 2020
    4
    Broken Age is a game with great potential that ultimately falls flat due to what feels like an abrupt ending. While the artwork, dialog, voice acting, and central themes are executed extremely well, the story fails to bring it all together in the last five yards. The game does have its good points; I certainly had a decent laugh more than once at some of the jokes, and a couple of theBroken Age is a game with great potential that ultimately falls flat due to what feels like an abrupt ending. While the artwork, dialog, voice acting, and central themes are executed extremely well, the story fails to bring it all together in the last five yards. The game does have its good points; I certainly had a decent laugh more than once at some of the jokes, and a couple of the puzzles really gave me an "aha!" moment when I finally solved them. Additionally, I appreciated the character switching mechanic, which really helped ease some frustration. While I'm not the biggest fan of point-and-click games, the earlier parts of Broken Age did keep me entertained. I would recommend this as a game for younger kids to play, as I feel like it has a good message and is a very wacky looking game. However, this one just wasn't for me. Expand
Metascore
81

Generally favorable reviews - based on 21 Critic Reviews

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 21
  2. Negative: 0 out of 21
  1. Play UK
    Jun 1, 2015
    50
    Beneath the lavish art style and the high quality production..., Broken Age ends up feeling rather empty and desolate. [Issue#257, p.72]
  2. Playstation Official Magazine Australia
    May 26, 2015
    75
    It's not the second coming of adventure games, but Broken Age is still a memorable jaunt. [July 2015, p82]
  3. May 11, 2015
    80
    Even with its flaws and a gameplay that could have been better, Broken Age shines thanks to its visuals and a superb dubbing, stating once again the love Tim Schafer and Double Fine implement in their games.