Dear Esther: Landmark Edition Image
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Mixed or average reviews - based on 12 Critics What's this?

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5.0

Mixed or average reviews- based on 16 Ratings

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  • Summary: Dear Esther is a first-person ghost story. Rather than traditional game-play the focus here is on exploration, uncovering the mystery of a lonely island, of who you are and why you are here. Fragments of story are randomly uncovered when exploring the various locations of the island, makingDear Esther is a first-person ghost story. Rather than traditional game-play the focus here is on exploration, uncovering the mystery of a lonely island, of who you are and why you are here. Fragments of story are randomly uncovered when exploring the various locations of the island, making every each journey a unique experience. Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 12
  2. Negative: 3 out of 12
  1. Sep 20, 2016
    90
    Dear Esther: Landmark Edition is an experience that has held my imagination for days after finishing it. It is beautiful yet haunting, sad yet inspiring. It may be short, but it is perfectly paced, and you owe it to yourself to experience this game, it will leave you breathless.
  2. Sep 19, 2016
    90
    Dear Ester, is in no uncertain terms, amazing. Its mysterious storytelling, haunting soundtrack and stunning visuals create an experience you won't want to wait to throw yourself back into.
  3. Sep 20, 2016
    85
    If I were rating it purely on its artistic merits, I'd give it 100. As a game, its unique qualities mark it out as something that deserves to be played and experienced, but if you're hoping for something action-packed, you're barking up the wrong tree. Dear Esther: Landmark Edition is a great game that transcends what a video game can be as a medium; a perfect marriage of artistry and ideas that you absolutely need to delve into.
  4. 80
    It goes without saying that Dear Esther: Landmark Edition won't be for everyone. However, those who are willing to open their minds and try something different are in for a treat, because Curve Digital has brought a haunting, beautiful and memorable experiences to consoles with this port.
  5. Nov 8, 2016
    75
    It's undeniably good… but if you're in the mood for great, you'll need to look at what came after.
  6. Oct 4, 2016
    50
    I admire Dear Esther for what it did, when it did it. It was a novel concept that came from the humblest of beginnings. Unfortunately, the product of it all is short and unenjoyable. It feels like a dream in the worst way. It’s confusing, fatiguing, and the feeling of relief comes when it’s over. In that way, they couldn’t have done a better job.
  7. Sep 21, 2016
    40
    Dear Esther is a boring slog with little narrative payoff. Although it does encourage an ideal of "interpret as you will", it lacks the foundation and support to drive discussions of death, life, and grief to the point to which it strives. Fortunately, the experience is short, cheap, and a good boost to an achievement score, but beyond that, is worth a pass.

See all 12 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 4
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 4
  3. Negative: 1 out of 4
  1. Oct 2, 2016
    10
    Yes, in this game you will only have the controls of walking. However, it is much more about the experience. Controls should not dictateYes, in this game you will only have the controls of walking. However, it is much more about the experience. Controls should not dictate whether a game has an amazing story or not. Dear Esther's poetic story had me in tears by the end, because it gave me a better story than any other game has ever produced for me, ever. I played Everybody's Gone to The Rapture, Gone Home, and you can even include more popular AAA games like The Last of Us, the Half-Life series, whatever you want to name: no game has produced the emotions this game did. And it's not all very clear, a lot of that emotion isn't necessarily about the game, but it's also just thinking about your life, and the people around you.

    So yes, the input you have is where to walk. But the power you have is to look, see, hear, and experience what you do in this game. If you want something concise but powerful, only a few movies carry the emotional impact of Dear Esther.
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  2. Sep 21, 2016
    10
    Beautiful music, beautiful narration, beautiful and poetic story, beautiful environments, in short a beautiful experience. I loved it fromBeautiful music, beautiful narration, beautiful and poetic story, beautiful environments, in short a beautiful experience. I loved it from beginning to end! Expand
  3. May 8, 2018
    8
    Dear Esther is a beautiful (if not short) game for the xbox one.
    While it is short, the hour and a half it took to play it was most
    Dear Esther is a beautiful (if not short) game for the xbox one.
    While it is short, the hour and a half it took to play it was most memorable, especially in the level 'the caves', where the game's beauty really showed, especially in a dark room. The soundtrack in this game is the perfect touch to the atmosphere and the story that eventually unravels, somber and empty yet at the same time a tinge of hope remains, and eventually appears at the game's close.
    The controls are simplistic as could be, which is a blessing and a curse, but I would say it definitely trends towards blessing in this game, as you're so busy taking in the area that more aspects of gameplay may bog down where the game is at its strongest, its experience.
    It's short, but that is actually advantageous with the simplistic control scheme presented within it. if it was any longer, though, it may start to feel dragged out.
    Nonetheless, it's a game i had a lot of fun with. Though it was brief, it was an all around enjoyable time, and a game that can easily be played again (and might even be better the second time around).
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  4. Mar 5, 2018
    1
    Dans le créneau des simulateurs de promenade, Dear Esther est l'un des premiers à avoir lancé cette mode du jeu qui n'en est pas un -plus un-Dans le créneau des simulateurs de promenade, Dear Esther est l'un des premiers à avoir lancé cette mode du jeu qui n'en est pas un -plus un- mais devenu une sorte d'expérience très vaguement interactive. Il faut reconnaître un caractère délassant à ce genre puisque personne ne cherche à vous tuer et que vous ne devez tuer personne...

    Pour autant, on peut s'interroger sur l'utilité et la légitimité d'un "machin" comme Dear Esther, très court (peut-être deux heures en le faisant... deux fois) et carrément abscons puisqu'on y entrave pas grand-chose si ce n'est qu'il s'agit d'un "drame" et des divagations d'un névropathe dépressif sur son île écossaise.

    Pendant qu'on marche lentement (si on pouvait courir, on finirait ce truc en un quart d'heure...) la voix off à intervalles plus ou moins réguliers vient nous déballer son spleen souvent d'assez mauvais goût (tout le monde ne peut pas être Baudelaire mais tout de même) et clairement pleurnichard. Une musique pas très réussie du reste vient également de temps à autre nous vriller les esgourdes.

    Au moins, c'est très joli à contempler et ça tourne à 60 im/s : j'eus aimé de tels graphismes sur cet autre simulateur de marche qu'est Firewatch, lequel n'affiche que 16 couleurs jaunâtres qui rament... mais ressemble à un vrai jeu ou presque. Que le monde vidéo-pas-ou-peu-ludique est mal fait !

    Chère Esther donc, je t'écris de mon île où j'ai trouvé 3 pneus de bagnole : seraient-ce des indices ? PS : si tu pouvais m'envoyer un jeu vidéo bien sale où on décapite des zombis, ça m'arrangerait parce que je me fais bien chier ici. Bisous.
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