United Artists | Release Date: March 7, 1931
8.8
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Universal acclaim based on 46 Ratings
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amheretojudgeOct 19, 2019
Day and night. Day and night. This is how the film travels making sure that both of them are present at once.

City Lights Charlie Chaplin's boxing match is not a serious match. I know that's obvious. But it is not. Not expected. At the back
Day and night. Day and night. This is how the film travels making sure that both of them are present at once.

City Lights

Charlie Chaplin's boxing match is not a serious match. I know that's obvious. But it is not. Not expected. At the back your thoughts, you are always waiting to get things serious. Gritty. Bloody. Brutal. Intense. And it is these films that makes us expect these things from a genre as such. Not even touching the Rocky milestone, I am just playing around Raging Bull by Martin Scorsese and Battling Butler by Michel Keaton- someone from Charlie's days itself. They've all tried to plaster the sincerity of that job on screen. You can joke around, fool around as much as you like but that sport is respected with a jarring punch when the time comes.

Not to say that Charlie doesn't respect it. His method of living up to that "dutiful" objective is somewhat different. Nay, not different. Mature. Ahead of time. He doesn't pay homage to those heavy lifters by putting them in the ring, but does it so elegantly in the dressing room. From hard work to the stakes that are played every night on the screen, everything is mocked or more accurately notified in Charlie's dictionary. There is a sense of pride in carrying that note.

And maybe that is why he has crafted such an empathetic and a low key character in the rest of the screen time. He is wreck but an adoptable one. Another thing that makes this film incredibly different than the others is the jokes. All the jokes are an elaborative comic sketches that takes energy along with time for it to work, from you. And then there is the end of the tunnel in the City Lights. A purely unconditional and innocent act that penetrates your emotion as that good old symbol of love arrow does. The birds fly and sing by merrily.
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10
TMProofreader3Aug 23, 2019
The best, GREATEST inspiring romcom movie ever made! With the best movie character ever portrayed: Charlie Chaplin as The Tramp! And the best movie score ever composed!
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9
OioioioioyciAug 24, 2019
Muito bom, amo desde criança, sou vooooooooooooooooooooooioooooooooiioiooooooioocriado nesse filme
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10
TootsieWootsyAug 29, 2019
The very best inspiring romcom movie ever made! With the best movie character: Charlie Chaplin as The Tramp! And the best movie score ever composed! Greatly Acted
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10
ChrisMizerakJan 5, 2020
Charlie Chaplin's silent romantic comedy sees his famous Little Tramp character come across a blind flower girl whom he befriends and vows to aid. The Little Tramp by contrast also shares an on-and-off friendship with a drunken millionaireCharlie Chaplin's silent romantic comedy sees his famous Little Tramp character come across a blind flower girl whom he befriends and vows to aid. The Little Tramp by contrast also shares an on-and-off friendship with a drunken millionaire who treats him like an equal when smashed but becomes a completely different person when sober.

Basically, the Tramp finds himself in two opposing yet comparable relationships with two people that are essentially blind in some shape or form. The flower girl with her literal sight, and the millionaire with his sense of self. It's a splendidly off-setting contrast that is masterfully executed by Chaplin with one brilliant comedic sequence and plot development after another.

One of the film's best comedic scenes involves the Tramp attempting to earn money for the flower girl's eye operation by contending in a boxing match. I wouldn't want to ruin what makes this scene so hilarious, but let's just say that there's always a purpose for a referee in the boxing ring, sometimes to the added benefit of the underdog.

Even if it's far from the comedy that made me laugh the hardest, that honor belonging to another film, "City Lights" is at the very least amongst the most elegantly poetic. It's no secret that Chaplin devotes much careful thought and craftsmanship into his works, and that dedication is clearly in full display with this title.

From the little details such as the Tramp's outfit being filled with holes in his jacket to bigger plot details such as the flower girl visually mistaking the Tramp for a millionaire. "City Lights" remains one of the finest examples to come from the romantic comedy genre some 90 years after its release, and no one can fail at seeing that.
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