Baltimore Sun's Scores

For 209 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Band of Brothers: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Do Not Disturb: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 133
  2. Negative: 0 out of 133
133 tv reviews
  1. A well-crafted opening to a television drama is like an overture to a musical. To succeed, it must, however fleetingly, sound the major themes and melody of the piece, as well as suggesting its continuing sensibility. Tonight's opening is a great one. [2 June 2002, p.5E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  2. Dazzling...The West Wing is the one new series you do not want to miss. In fact, you don't even want to show up late for its start at 9 tonight. Walk the dog early, shut off the telephone at 8: 55, bribe the kids if necessary to get them in bed, just be there for the one new series that will remind you how exciting the fall network TV season used to be before the networks lost their way in bottom-line thinking and mega-corp greed. [22 Sept 1999, p.1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  3. The show is vulgar, adolescent and sexist -- and seems proud of it. [18 July 2004, p.2F]
    • Baltimore Sun
  4. So daring, richly multi-dimensional and culturally provocative that it's almost anti-television. [3 June 2001, p.2F]
    • Baltimore Sun
  5. The Sheen persona wears thin after a while, and Jones is just another kid actor with a goofy-sweet face. But what could make this sitcom fly is Cryer. He injects Alan with a manic energy that literally lifts the pilot into a higher comic gear each time he begins to catalog or rant about all his anxieties and fears. [22 Sept 2003, p.1C]
    • Baltimore Sun
  6. It is every bit as smart as you would expect something from Chase to be. It's built more on the limited-run model of British television than standard network fare. [9 Jan 1999, p.1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  7. The humor is dark, and the editing is fast-paced and often non-linear. The visual sensibility heightens the surreal quality of life and death with young Dr. Dorian as he careens like a bumper-car through his shift. [2 Oct 2001, p.1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  8. I like Williams as an actor, always have. But he can sink to the level of those around him, and I'm not too sure about the kids in this drama -- Vivien Cardone as his 9-year-old daughter Delia, and Gregory Smith as his 15-year-old son, Ephram. On the other hand, who knows with kids anyway? They could get better in a hurry. The writing also has a tendency to go a bit gooey in the middle. [16 Sept 2002, p.1C]
    • Baltimore Sun
  9. I love The Shield so much, I spent the two weeks since I saw it wondering if I could bring myself to actually say in print what I thought after screening the first three episodes: This is better than "Homicide: Life on the Street." If you've been reading The Sun for any length of time, you know I face East, bow my head and light incense in an act of worship at the mere mention of that late, great, ratings-challenged NBC drama. [12 Mar 2002, p.1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  10. In the pilot, at least, Whedon manages to capture some of the same "Buffy" sensibility -- a rare combination of sexual energy, irony, intelligence, hot bodies, cool moves, action, menace and comic relief. The challenge is to sustain that tricky tone for a full season. [5 Oct 1999, p.1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  11. While there is no shortage of narrative theorists who talk about detective fiction as being most successful when it is like a puzzle, no one on network television has ever managed to create a series that could make viewers feel as if they were actually putting together a puzzle piece by piece as they watched. Perhaps the nearest anyone came was the writing team of Richard Levinson and William Link with their pilot for Peter Falk's Columbo, but Boomtown is light years beyond what Levinson and Link were doing in the 1970s. [28 Sept 2002, p.1D]
    • Baltimore Sun
  12. Spin City is television as culture, and I am not sure whether a show like this merely plugs into the cynicism already in place in our country or creates more and more of it by making it seem like the hip, in-the-know way to be.[17 Sept 1996, p.]
    • Baltimore Sun
  13. I have now seen the pilot for Felicity four times. The first two times were just for enjoyment. The last two were reality checks to see if it is really as good as it seemed during the first two viewings. It is...Felicity is not just the best pilot. It is the one joy of the new network season. [29 Sept 1998, p.1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  14. Alias is one of the most non-linear and illogical pilots I have ever seen. It's also one of the most exciting television rides I've had in years. I love its energy. The breathless, roller-coaster montage of movement, color, action and emotion never quits. [29 Sept 2001, p.1D]
    • Baltimore Sun
  15. His team is formulaic - and that's not a good thing. Omar Epps plays neurologist Dr. Eric Foreman. He's African-American, and even though he had great medical school grades, House says he was chosen for his "street smarts." Jennifer Morrison is immunologist Dr. Allison Cameron, and, while she is beautiful and brainy, in the second episode, she acknowledges some sexual issues. Jesse Spencer, as intensive-care specialist Dr. Robert Chase, is from the WASP world of old money, but nothing he says or does in the first two episodes offers any social-class insights. [16 Nov 2004, p.1C]
    • Baltimore Sun
  16. The best new sitcom of the fall...It's a very strong cast. [22 Sept 1994, p.1D]
    • Baltimore Sun
  17. While the action genre and, indeed, Friday nights on Fox, are most targeted at young men, particularly adolescent males, I have to admit I kind of like Firefly. I'm not sure, though, whether that says more about my level of maturity than it does the series' potential appeal to older viewers. [20 Sept 2002, p.1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  18. Neither Meloni nor Hargitay is a great actor, and both are guilty of overacting here...The limited range of each is suggested by their over-reliance on one or two basics moves. Meloni purses his lips and bugs his eyes out to tell us he's intense and/or getting mad. Hargitay runs her hand through her hair to tell us she's stressed. She does the hair thing so many times tonight you fear she'll have pulled all her hair out by midseason. [20 Sept 1999, p.1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  19. The Eric character and his sort-of girlfriend, Donna (Laura Prepon), do provide a few sparks of interest in this ensemble of dumbed-down teens, but it's not enough for me...Fox calls the series "retro hip." I think it's retro dull. It probably seems a lot funnier if you are 16 and smoking pot. [22 Aug 1998, p.1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  20. Freaks and Geeks will certainly capture the heart of anyone who came of age in the late '70s and early '80s (it's set in 1980) and should ring true for anyone whose high school memories have not been totally sublimated...One of the few shows this season that's left me waiting anxiously for week two. [25 Sept 1999, p.1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  21. But the paranormal is not what counts. It's the FBI agents who matter -- they're one of TV's most interesting twentysomething couples. [10 Sept 1993, p.1D]
    • Baltimore Sun
  22. As improbable as the premise might sound, Bell's hard-edged performance makes it work. [22 Sept 2004,p. 1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  23. Abrams brilliantly exploits several genres simultaneously - including reality TV with all that viewers have come to learn (or think they have come to learn) about group dynamics by watching CBS' Survivor the past four years. What's most impressive is the way that Abrams - through the skillful construction of character via credible dialogue and camera work that makes one feel almost situated within the group - makes Lost feel as if it is the real thing. [22 Sept 2004,p. 1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
  24. There are just too many problems with the lead character and writing for this to ever become a PBS staple like "Inspector Morse" or "Miss Marple" had been.
  25. This film was one of the most pleasant surprises I've had in a year of screening hundreds of TV productions. In fact, it made my weekend.
  26. I suspect Olbermann could build it out exponentially. But for that to happen, Gore or someone is going to have to rein Olbermann in on reckless and self-indulgent attack segments like the last one with Moulitsas.
  27. It's just plain good--fast-paced, emotionally engaging and even transporting at times. Much of the credit goes to Fishburne's performance, but there other important factors, like the way in which Stevens' script captures Marshall's liberating sense of humor, and the rich look of the overall production.
  28. Whatever the case, he and his show are easier to like. The hour flew by, and it seemed much looser, organic and easy-going than anything I saw last year by him on NBC.
  29. I will waste little time on the wretched Lennon production: Lennon Naked, a Masterpiece Contemporary airing Sunday night on PBS. I write this only to warn viewers off of wasting even 10 minutes of TV time and their lives with this sorry docu-drama that follows Lennon through his Beatles fame and into his marriage to Yoko Ono and the end of the band.
  30. The power of the writing and performances are such that after just 30 minutes, you feel as if you know each of these characters intimately--and you find yourself already caring about them. And you wonder what role they will play in the troubled life and journey of Dr. Paul Weston.

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