Game Informer's Scores

  • Games
For 7,153 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Overwatch
Lowest review score: 1 Legends of Wrestling II
Score distribution:
7162 game reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    By affording you such command of a terrific catalogue of diverse hits and certifiable classics, Fuser allows you to aptly fulfill the DJ fantasy better than ever before, without the need for clunky peripherals you’ll only use for one game. Though I poured hours into the experience, I still feel like I have so many corners and interactions to explore within the library of available tracks. Fuser transcends musical genres to deliver a magical and intuitive music creation toolset within the framework of a game.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The full-team on-court action plays the best it ever has, and the graphical leap is impressive to boot, but it still comes up short in some key areas.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Though some of the modes don’t provide the deepest experiences, I enjoyed my time racing around in Dirt 5 thanks to a fun career mode and a community section bustling with potential. Whether you’re earning your spot among the superstars or creating a vehicular obstacle course of your dreams, Dirt 5 is worthy of a spot on the podium.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Hyrule Warriors: Age of Calamity looks a lot like Breath of the Wild, but it lacks the exploration and puzzle-solving elements that define the mainline Legend of Zelda series. Age of Calamity may not resemble a traditional Zelda game, but it’s not a bad time. The action is repetitive, but also relaxed and comfortable. It trades on your love for Nintendo’s classic franchise, and I was happy for the excuse to return to this version of Hyrule. I still feel like I'm chasing Breath of the Wild's high, and Age of Calamity is a small solace.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you want a looter-slasher that’s all about the stat bumps and the delight of seeing enemies suffer from the enchantments you worked hard to unlock, Godfall delivers plenty of that and is backed by a hell of a combat system. It hits that one note and holds it from start to finish.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    If Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War excels at anything, it’s options. This isn’t uncommon for a Call of Duty title, but with a vast array of game modes for myriad player profiles and a fun campaign that retains a summer-blockbuster feel while getting weird and wild, the ride is a good one.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Carto’s humorous cast and heartwarming tale about finding your way while bringing people together inject the game with heart. When the going got tough, the narrative always put a smile back on my face. Even with a few mismatched elements, Carto fits its pieces into a largely enjoyable whole.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    For newcomers, Demon’s Souls will be the first exploration into the duality of despair and triumph, and hopefully go on to become a starting point for new Souls fans. For veterans, it’s a homage to an experiment that kicked off a fantastic genre. Either way, it’s wonderful that the nascent ethers from the original classic have coalesced and given us this delightful treat.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The visual upgrade on PS5 is hard to ignore, with Sumo Digital displaying a mastery of recreating materials. Subtle and impressive lighting effects add an additional layer of believably to physical objects such as fabric, metals, and other surfaces – and even the nearly invisible wisps of fuzz on Sackboy’s head. Even though the fidelity isn’t quite as sharp on PS4, a strong overall aesthetic direction makes it still look appealing on the aging hardware. DualSense implementation makes for another strong case to play on PS5 if at all possible. The controller’s haptics and adaptive triggers are put to great use, mimicking the sensation of walking on different surfaces and hoisting heavy objects. Regardless of what version you pick up, you’ll be setting off on a joyous and satisfying journey. But if you have a choice, the PS5 version is the clear winner here.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I didn’t realize how much Kingdom Hearts’ soundtrack has impacted me until I played Melody of Memory. As a fan of the series, I’ve always praised the score, but something about actually going back through various tracks and tapping to the beats on familiar backdrops showcased just how powerful these songs have been. Melody of Memory delivers great music and tons of unlockables to keep you listening.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Pathless is a wonderfully different game that makes you feel like you have ownership over the entire experience and are not being led along by a pre-scripted playbook.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Young Horses has created a silly but heartfelt story and adventure game, but the creature-capturing gameplay never really hits its stride.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Sakuna: Of Rice and Ruin is full of highs and lows. From one moment to the next, it can be a lot of fun. Farming and fighting are each entertaining independently, but the systems supporting those central concepts feel unrefined. Combat is cool, but the pacing interrupts its momentum. The rice-based progression is interesting, but the story and characters are not. All of these trade-offs prevent Sakuna: Of Rice and Ruin from delivering its full bounty, though you can still reap the benefits of its novel combination of ideas.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Devil May Cry 5 holds up, and I had a good time revisiting it in different ways. Vergil, turbo mode, and the Legendary Dark Knight difficulty are good additions – but fans have already seen all of those features in the series’ previous special editions. They are still worthwhile, but don’t expect any big surprises here. Devil May Cry 5: Special Edition is the best way to play an already-good game, but the fine-tuning doesn’t elevate the experience to new heights.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    With an engaging combination of combat, exploration, and crafted story content, this Viking legend is an epic with a little something for everyone.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    No load times. Beautiful raytracing. The PlayStation 5 version of Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales is a technical juggernaut that continually impresses. It is the ideal way to play the game if you can. Feeling the Venom flow through the controller is quite cool. That’s not to say the PlayStation 4 version is far behind, however. Marvel’s Spider-Man from 2018 remains one of the generation’s best-looking and playing games, and this game’s performance is in lockstep with it. Fast travel and restarts bring up short subway rides and loading screens (they are instant on PS5), and the visuals may not have that next-gen sheen, but the PS4 version is still a beautiful and worthy way to experience this excellent game.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At its best, Astro’s Playroom recaptures the magic of my favorite Lego video games – except the license on display is the PlayStation brand instead of something like Star Wars or Marvel. The cameos are plentiful and amusing, with franchises that go beyond the first-party catalogue, along with some surprisingly deep cuts that made me feel very old. But in the midst of all that history, Astro feels like an adorably fresh face; I’m glad to see the character break out of the confines of VR and reach out to a broader audience. Astro’s Playroom may not be the deepest or most ambitious game on PS5, but its humor and playfulness are just delightful.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Like a Dragon is a departure from the games that came before it, but I found those changes to be revitalizing. As much as I enjoyed the Yakuza formula, it was definitely a formula. Like a Dragon has enough familiar elements to make it feel like, at its heart, it’s a Yakuza game. All the while, I fully appreciated how much of a new identity this entry is establishing. Here’s hoping this is the first step in yet another great journey for the series.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Visage creates a palpable playground for fans of horror to revel in, tapping into different flavors of fear to create an unsettling experience. All too often, genre titles fall back on repetitive jump scares and shock value, but Visage lets the house burn into your brain and leaves you questioning every decision to open a door or descend a staircase.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Little Hope is inconsistent, like a witch-in-training still learning how to fully weave a spell. It sets up its story well and keeps you guessing, but the execution is lacking. It needs more variety and interesting things for your characters to do. The action comes too late, and by then, you’re already nodding off. However, seeing the fantastic ending makes putting up with those boring moments a little more bearable.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Pikmin 3 was one of my favorite Wii U games, which isn’t meant to be faint praise it sounds like. Thanks to Pikmin 3 Deluxe, players who didn’t get around to checking it out in its original form have a chance to do so on the Switch. And better yet, they’re getting a version that lives up to its potential as a game to bring people together – even if it’s just to move tangerines and grapes around.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Legion feels like the realization of the hacker fantasy the first Watch Dogs tried to capture. Between the fun team-building, fantastic mission design, strong narrative, and a gorgeous world, everything comes together in a largely entertaining and cohesive package. Whether you’re controlling a trained super spy or a gassy grandmother, Watch Dogs: Legion is a ton of fun.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, The Red Lantern is a stunning game that offers a juxtaposition of being both a calming experience and one that can inspire a level of anxiety due to the more randomized nature of the mechanics. Watching that meter drop and feeling hope drop down with it can sometimes feel like a punch to the gut, but eventually a rhythm is found and relaxing around a campfire with a full belly, a warm fire, and adorable furry friends more than makes up for those dips in euphoria.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Even after I felt like I’d seen behind the curtain and knew how the machinery worked, I still moved timidly through Amnesia: Rebirth's world, which is a testament to Frictional Games’ superb environmental design and sound work. Tasi Trianon’s journey is a surprisingly emotional rollercoaster, and I’m glad I saw that story to the end. The cave full of horrifying monsters I could deal with, but I never want to see those infuriating puzzles again.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    For now, NHL 21 gets the job done, especially if you want to play a fancier, flashier game. I still had plenty of fun, and when you consider that it’s the only way to experience the NHL until the real league gets back on the ice in January, it’s not a bad way to get your hockey fix.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Despite its shortcomings, Mario Kart Live: Home Circuit still brings hours of fun. While firing up Mario Kart 8 Deluxe is more convenient and fully featured, Mario Kart Live’s unique take on the series is worth checking out for those looking for exciting twists on a well-worn concept.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Clever class design accepted, Torchlight III doesn’t offer tremendous innovation or nuance in its systems or gameplay. The gratuitous destruction is often great fun, right up until the hour marker when it’s not, and it all starts to feel a bit tedious. Thankfully, there’s always a new magic sword to collect, a respec to try out, a new character class to discover, or a dungeon to delve. Torchlight III is an approachable action/RPG that’s especially welcoming to newcomers, or simply players who don’t want to focus too hard on their evening’s entertainment. Repeat conquerors of heaven and hell may wish to look elsewhere, but if your desires for fantasy destruction are more about high-octane action, Torchlight III rarely disappoints.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    The graphics and gameplay of FIFA 21 deliver fun and functional football, but its ambitions don’t extend far beyond that. Over time, the grinding leads to burnout and boredom, and the gear and rewards you’re working so hard to obtain are rarely satisfying enough to make the chase worthwhile. Nailing the fundamentals is important, but it takes more than that to be a real winner.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Genshin Impact is a whimsical, wondrous land dripping with unbridled charm and appeal, combining a ridiculously compelling reward loop with unfettered, continuous discovery. In this world I felt like a child visiting theme park for the first time — dazzled, mesmerized, and completely swept away. I only wish the shimmering glow wasn’t marred by a ghoulish monetization model, but that’s something I’m willing to overlook for my ticket to this fascinating realm.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    In many ways, Crash Bandicoot 4: It’s About Time feels like a game that shouldn’t work. Single-player, mascot-driven, hardcore platformers are few and far between these days. Moreover, most franchises born in the mid-‘90s have had to continually reboot themselves to match the tastes of an ever-changing market. At its core, Crash 4 remains rooted to the old way of doing things, but that’s not a bad thing. The visuals are cleaner now and Crash has a few new gimmicks, but if you squint, Crash 4 looks like the same old platformer you’ve always loved.

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