Road to VR's Scores

  • Games
For 125 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 10% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Astro Bot: Rescue Mission
Lowest review score: 30 Gnomes & Goblins
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 69 out of 125
  2. Negative: 7 out of 125
130 game reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Well-refined visuals are impressive in their own right in Hubris, although the core of this shooter is a little too hollow to be truly engaging. Some good decisions make for highlights, like interesting environments and one-off narrative events, although adventuring is stymied by a "helpful" floating drone who just can't seem to read the room.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Broken Edge is a multiplayer fencing game that offers up a great chance to roleplay a number of distinct fighting classes in a 1v1 battle. Single player is essentially just practice for online play, which is a shame since replicating moves isn't always a straightforward task and you may find yourself quickly outclassed by steadier hands. Most players may need a good amount of time in the dojo and in solo mode before you can not only replicate specific moves, but in a way that doesn't overextend outside of your headset's tracking volume.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Bonelab is similar to its predecessor in key ways—both the good and the bad. The game's physics driven world can be refreshingly immersive in the way that almost everything interacts together. But physics sometimes make the game less fun and even frustrating to play, especially when it comes to the game's many climbing segments. While there's lots on offer, including a campaign and several replayable mini-modes, they all suffer from the same core problems which is boring enemies with little variety, poor encounter & puzzle design, and bland weapons. In lieu of having those things provided for you, you'll have to extract your own fun by challenging yourself to execute stylish kills and physics-shenanigans with the game's all-you-can eat slo-mo feature. While the game repeats most of Boneworks key issues, this time around if offers proper modding support which could improve things significantly— that is... if the game's community is willing to spend the time building the toys this sandbox should have had from the start.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Into the Radius presents a large world that's about as dangerous as it is fascinating. While paying homage to the Soviet sci-fi classics Roadside Picnic and Stalker, the game easily provides 20+ hours of wasteland stalking and enemy encounters in an engrossing and well fleshed-out world. The game's attention to detail and immersive depth is shallowed somewhat by finicky object interaction and less than polished visuals that really should feel as solid as the game's ethos.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Red Matter 2 brings best-in-class graphics and interactions to Quest 2, a welcomed entry amidst a largely arcade-focused library—and stands as a solid PC VR title in its own right. Mostly good puzzling gameplay is mixed with a light helping of not-so-good combat, set against a backdrop of a 'radio play' plot that's not particularly engaging. With a stellar attention to graphical detail and direction, both large & small, and a richly interactive world, Red Matter 2 excels in the immersion department in a way that few VR games do. While effectively channeling titles like Lone Echo and Half-Life: Alyx, it doesn't quite reach that mark, but for a small team and a reasonable $30 price tag it's an impressive feat—especially considering the computational limitations of Quest 2.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    COMPOUND clearly has a love for the classics, as it provides its own take on the single-player shooter genre with some stylish and well-crafted pixel art. The game cleverly focuses on slowing down the pace by making default gun handling a very deliberate experience, so only those who can master its slightly unorthodox reloading scheme (or use the optional auto-loading mode) can go full bore. Plenty of progressive weapon unlocks and three selectable gameplay difficulties give ample reason for players to come back for more pixel-busting carnage well past beating the end boss for the first time.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Ruinsmagus is a definite treat for anime fans, as it serves up a thick slice of art and narrative inspired by some of the greats. The game's battle system is mostly efficacious, although it's hindered by a bad inventory management system. Its penchant to adhering to some flatscreen traditions is also a sore spot that makes it feel mechanical, and about as repetitive as its dungeons.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Last Clockwinder is a charming puzzle game that's about more than just robots growing fruit. The bulk of the game of course challenges you to optimize clone-driven contraptions, but there's a feeling of a real lived-in world under the surface that demonstrates some serious expertise in worldbuilding. The game's Studio Ghibli-inspired setting could be more interactive, and more narrative byways could help flesh out some of the downtime in between waiting for your harvest to mature, although it's hard to knock such a sweet and well-crafted tale.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Moss: Book II is a direct continuation of the first game in both story and core mechanics. Generally speaking, it's a longer and better experience than the original Moss thanks to the introduction of new weapons, mechanics, and more intriguing puzzles. The game is polished to the brim with stellar art direction, with each segment of the game being its own detailed diorama with top notch composition. Sound is strong and animations are superb throughout, with one of the game's enjoyable boss fights showcasing Polyarc's animation prowess in particular. Though the 'narrated book' story structure may have hindered the impact of the story and characters, Moss: Book II is a well rounded adventure you won't want to miss.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Virtuoso is more than just an immersive place where you mess around with virtual instruments. It's more of a beginner's music creation tool than a simple sandbox. With only basic knowledge you can easily create music, although drilling into the settings and massaging a more unique sound out of the looper will ultimately be the most rewarding use of this immersive little music machine.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At best, the campaign mode is a guided way to learn the game's range of unique mechs before digging into multiplayer, but if you're only here for the campaign then you'll probably be disappointed at its poorly executed story and characters, and the significant pacing issues that come along with them. While the game's campaign elements don't deliver, Vox Machinae creates a totally unique and immersive mech experience that really makes you feel like you're controlling a giant robot.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ultrawings 2 is a sight for sore eyes, giving fans of the original more of everything in a new and improved package. Outside of fun flight challenges, Ultrawings 2 introduces a smattering of military-style combat missions that take the franchise in a new and interesting direction that we'd like to see more of. The formula of grinding for cash doesn't feel very magical after a while, and object interaction is lackluster, making for a more frustrating flying experience, although it's hard to knock such a plucky little flight game that sits neatly somewhere between simulator and arcade flier.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Wanderer mostly delivers on its promise to immerse players in a sci-fi adventure that has you trekking across time, replete with fun and interesting set pieces that offer up plenty of objects to collect and use as you move forward (and backwards). Voice acting and its script are all on point, however clunky object interaction hampers the entire experience since you're constantly searching and manipulating items. That's more of a casual warning on what to expect than a solid reason not to play though.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After the Fall executes its vision of Left 4 Dead in VR with gusto, as it brings much of what made Valve's four-player co-op great back 2008. There's still room for improvement when it comes to enemy variation and object interaction, but fans of arcade shooters may have a hard time knocking it on this alone, as it competently brings PC, PSVR, and Quest 2 in one big cross-platform splatter fest.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Warhammer: Age of Sigmar – Tempestfall brings some good ideas to the table but only executes a few of them well. While the game’s ranged spellcasting is satisfying and fun, most of the focus is put into a shoddy melee system that’s functional at best and frustrating at worst, with enemy design and variety only exacerbating the issue. With inconsistent art direction and asset quality, weak sound design, amatuer-level animations, and poor writing, Tempestfall feels like a clear case of trying to do too much with too little.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Unplugged's rhythm-based gameplay replaces the dedicated Guitar Hero-style peripheral for an air guitar that relies entirely on Quest's hand-tracking, which still feels a bit too experimental to be the main focus of a game that shows such rock star-level polish and flair. With the right intention though, players can get a good taste of the fun and even build up the skills needed to attack songs on hard.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Resident Evil 4 for Quest 2 is a competent VR port of the survival horror classic, bringing to the game newly polished visuals and a first-person VR perspective that doesn't disappoint. Despite some awesome additions to make it feel more like a VR native, there are some unfortunate holdovers like 2D cutscenes which somehow make it feel less cinematic and immersive than it might otherwise feel.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    You can't craft your way to godhood in Song in the Smoke like in some survival games, but you can build a hardened resolve to make it through this primeval adventure, which challenges the player to get through each day in the face of hunger, cold, fatigue, and plenty of beasts that lurk in the shadows. Combat isn't super engaging, and visuals feel a little too muddy to be awe-inspiring, but Song in the Smoke can still leave you breathless with its large and complex levels that hide many secrets.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Lone Echo II brings us more about what we loved from the first game, but plays it quite safe and doesn't break much new ground. While it's nice to be introduced to some new and important characters, they don't see much development, which contributes to a plot that doesn't feel very impactful. The game doesn't do much to challenge the player in combat or puzzles, but it excels in immersion. Between its intuitive zero-G locomotion and (at times) open map design, it's just a bit magical to feel like you're really outside of a derelict space station orbiting Saturn. The game could have benefited from better pacing and a bit more threat and tension, but if you liked doing space chores the first time around, you'll enjoy it here too.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Rhythm of the Universe: Ionia guides you through simple one-off puzzles and frontloads an embarrassing amount of exposition and cutscenes that stubbornly put cinematic pretense ahead of user immersion. Ionia talks of big game, but this musical adventure is over before it truly begins, which considering the level of pretense isn't the worse thing about this meandering 45-minute experience.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    Fracked has a lot going for it: satisfying weapon interactions, a great visual style, a unique and very functional cover system, and a handful of side activities like skiing, climbing, and light puzzling to break up the game's pace. When it comes to combat, the game lacks the variety necessary to keep things interesting through the end, petering out early on with just three enemies and two main weapons. The story does its best to drive the action forward, but feels underdeveloped, leaving the player wondering what their motivations are and scratching their head at the perplexing ending.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    I Expect You to Die 2 may be more of the same, but it's a good slice of fun, espionage-flavored action that again tasks you with disarming cleverly-designed and deadly puzzles provided by the evil Bond-style Zoraxis corporation. While object interaction isn't the game's strong suit, the sequel offers up a good number of varied levels packed with truly intriguing puzzles, oftentimes containing multiple ways to die that always feel like the joke's on you.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although it's not "Mirror's Edge in VR," STRIDE takes some of the most visible influences from the game and nearly perfects them in VR. Offering a few humble arcade-style modes where the action plays out, the free running shooter serves up high-flying thrills that are importantly comfortable to the user. There's some learning curve to finesse the game's parkour locomotion and arcade shooting, and it's not without issue, but otherwise this Quest port is a good example of modern VR design implemented to make flatscreen-style action fast and accessible to VR users.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    YUKI is a nostalgia-soaked bullet hell shooter that puts you in control of an action figure-sized protagonist. As a roguelike game, YUKI is patently difficult and essentially requires a fair bit of grinding to get to the end boss. Fun and useful upgrades are dolled out often enough to keep you coming back for more though. We were left wanting more of the cool and stylish Japanese mythology-inspired bosses and inventive levels, but that may speak to just how fun and cohesive the entire experience is. It's best played standing, however seated mode may ask for simply too much movement to really be practical.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    True to its name, Sniper Elite VR delivers strong sniping mechanics, but the surrounding action doesn't do it justice. With a great VR sniper scope implementation and the franchise's signature x-ray kill cam, delivering those long shots can definitely be satisfying. Unfortunately the homogenous enemies and weapons blur together against a backdrop of unmemorable levels and story. The game's graphical presentation on Quest is surprisingly good, with long draw distances, sharp imagery, and great performance. Sniper Elite VR is also a very comfortable game with a wide range of comfort options, but the teleport mode is painfully slow—to the point that I wouldn't recommend the game if you must play it with teleport.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Larcenauts is a technically well made game with strong art direction, great performance, and a sense of progression with eight characters to unlock, each with different loadouts and customizations. In its launch state the gameplay feels more like a run-and-gun free-for-all than a team-based hero shooter, and it may take a balance pass (or two) to get things closer to the latter. While Larcenauts has the breadth of mechanics that you'd hope to see in a hero shooter, it's missing an immersive hook due to minimal VR-specific interactions. The developer has promised that more immersive interactions will be added down the line, but it's a shame they aren't part of the game from the get-to.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Though the concept really works and the experience is enjoyable and comfortable, A Rogue Escape would have benefited from more carefully tuning input for specific VR controllers, more polished audio, and more content length.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Demeo is a very solid tabletop game that hits the mark on balance, difficulty, and polish, but in its quest to offer up a more true-to-life tabletop game experience, it doesn't focus enough on leveraging VR mechanics to bring players more into the action.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Wraith: The Oblivion - Afterlife serves up a fairly substantial slice of fear and intrigue. Don't be too held back by the pulpy delivery of the game's narrative, or some bits with noticeably lower polish, because in the end this horror-adventure fundamentally delivers on its promise to get your heart racing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    From the outside looking it, The Climb 2 feels very much like the first, with its gamified freeclimbing and leaderboard-centric gameplay. But just under the surface is a newer, bolder game that goes in a few unexpected directions. New environments host fun gadgets like ziplines and moving platforms, and plenty of choice when it comes to self-imposed difficulty. Level design is spot on, although visuals could be better optimized for a more immersive experience.

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