Road to VR's Scores

  • Games
For 105 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 11% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Astro Bot: Rescue Mission
Lowest review score: 30 Deracine
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 58 out of 105
  2. Negative: 5 out of 105
111 game reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    Fracked has a lot going for it: satisfying weapon interactions, a great visual style, a unique and very functional cover system, and a handful of side activities like skiing, climbing, and light puzzling to break up the game's pace. When it comes to combat, the game lacks the variety necessary to keep things interesting through the end, petering out early on with just three enemies and two main weapons. The story does its best to drive the action forward, but feels underdeveloped, leaving the player wondering what their motivations are and scratching their head at the perplexing ending.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    I Expect You to Die 2 may be more of the same, but it's a good slice of fun, espionage-flavored action that again tasks you with disarming cleverly-designed and deadly puzzles provided by the evil Bond-style Zoraxis corporation. While object interaction isn't the game's strong suit, the sequel offers up a good number of varied levels packed with truly intriguing puzzles, oftentimes containing multiple ways to die that always feel like the joke's on you.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although it's not "Mirror's Edge in VR," STRIDE takes some of the most visible influences from the game and nearly perfects them in VR. Offering a few humble arcade-style modes where the action plays out, the free running shooter serves up high-flying thrills that are importantly comfortable to the user. There's some learning curve to finesse the game's parkour locomotion and arcade shooting, and it's not without issue, but otherwise this Quest port is a good example of modern VR design implemented to make flatscreen-style action fast and accessible to VR users.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    YUKI is a nostalgia-soaked bullet hell shooter that puts you in control of an action figure-sized protagonist. As a roguelike game, YUKI is patently difficult and essentially requires a fair bit of grinding to get to the end boss. Fun and useful upgrades are dolled out often enough to keep you coming back for more though. We were left wanting more of the cool and stylish Japanese mythology-inspired bosses and inventive levels, but that may speak to just how fun and cohesive the entire experience is. It's best played standing, however seated mode may ask for simply too much movement to really be practical.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    True to its name, Sniper Elite VR delivers strong sniping mechanics, but the surrounding action doesn't do it justice. With a great VR sniper scope implementation and the franchise's signature x-ray kill cam, delivering those long shots can definitely be satisfying. Unfortunately the homogenous enemies and weapons blur together against a backdrop of unmemorable levels and story. The game's graphical presentation on Quest is surprisingly good, with long draw distances, sharp imagery, and great performance. Sniper Elite VR is also a very comfortable game with a wide range of comfort options, but the teleport mode is painfully slow—to the point that I wouldn't recommend the game if you must play it with teleport.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Larcenauts is a technically well made game with strong art direction, great performance, and a sense of progression with eight characters to unlock, each with different loadouts and customizations. In its launch state the gameplay feels more like a run-and-gun free-for-all than a team-based hero shooter, and it may take a balance pass (or two) to get things closer to the latter. While Larcenauts has the breadth of mechanics that you'd hope to see in a hero shooter, it's missing an immersive hook due to minimal VR-specific interactions. The developer has promised that more immersive interactions will be added down the line, but it's a shame they aren't part of the game from the get-to.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Though the concept really works and the experience is enjoyable and comfortable, A Rogue Escape would have benefited from more carefully tuning input for specific VR controllers, more polished audio, and more content length.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Demeo is a very solid tabletop game that hits the mark on balance, difficulty, and polish, but in its quest to offer up a more true-to-life tabletop game experience, it doesn't focus enough on leveraging VR mechanics to bring players more into the action.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Wraith: The Oblivion - Afterlife serves up a fairly substantial slice of fear and intrigue. Don't be too held back by the pulpy delivery of the game's narrative, or some bits with noticeably lower polish, because in the end this horror-adventure fundamentally delivers on its promise to get your heart racing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    From the outside looking it, The Climb 2 feels very much like the first, with its gamified freeclimbing and leaderboard-centric gameplay. But just under the surface is a newer, bolder game that goes in a few unexpected directions. New environments host fun gadgets like ziplines and moving platforms, and plenty of choice when it comes to self-imposed difficulty. Level design is spot on, although visuals could be better optimized for a more immersive experience.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Medal of Honor: Above and Beyond proclaims to be a AAA production (and is priced as such) but falls well short of that bar. With simplistic core gameplay, uninteresting & daft enemies, and a lack of polish, the bulk of the game feels like a shooting gallery. The set-piece sequences which are supposed to deliver epic WWII moments are foiled by bad writing, pacing, and lack of player agency. A meaningful portion of the game (roughly 10–20%) largely ignores best practices of VR comfort and won't be comfortable for some players. Competitive players might find some fun in the game's fast-paced and largely competent multiplayer component, and the 'Gallery' mini-documentaries are exceptionally well produced, but a shame that they are locked in with a game that conflicts with their reverent tone.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Star Wars: Squadrons puts you in the lovingly reimaged cockpits from the storied franchise, making you feel like you've truly stepped into the Star Wars universe. All of the hallmarks of a AAA title are here, and the VR mode doesn't disappoint despite not being a true built-for-VR title. Although we were expecting a bloated tutorial-focused campaign, the story mode turns out to be a true highlight of the game, and introduced. Multiplayer still feels like its evolving, although there's at least the peace of mind that you'll always find a match thanks to cross-platform support across console and PC.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Until You Fall successfully brings together satisfying hack & slash gameplay with deeper combat systems that make for meaningful strategic choices about the weapons you bring to the battlefield and the way that you use them. The game's underlying systems could be communicated a bit more clearly to get players up to speed. As a rogue-lite, there's no compelling world, characters, or story to unravel, but challenging combat and the allure of enhancing your weapons or experimenting with new ones will make you want to play 'just one more run' over and over.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Gnomes & Goblins delivers a delicious appetizer but is spoiled by a rotten main course. After a lovely little prologue, the game opens up into a beautiful world with frustratingly little gameplay direction which is likely to drive players away rather than bring them back for more. To enjoy the game's best aspect—its visuals—you'll need a hefty rig; be sure to check the Minimum and Recommended specs before considering Gnomes & Goblins.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The Walking Dead Onslaught unfortunately suffers from a bad case of being overstuffed with filler, making you grind through inconsequential missions to move forward in the story. Although there's some fun to be had mowing down zombies and hunting for useful items in the wasteland for a while, after the first few hours it begins to feel like a chore, and not an exploration of the world envisioned in the TV series. This is offset somewhat by the game's excellent character design, weapon variety, and physics-based zombie killing, but it does little to mitigate the hours spent loading up on items that never seems like just recompense for the time spent gathering them.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    With one foot thrust into the present and one foot invariably still stuck in the past design-wise, Vertigo Remastered is not entirely polished to a mirror sheen, but it's a gem worth experiencing just the same. It does an admirable job of serving up a good degree of variety, fun set pieces, and an all around interesting experience that, despite pervasive physics-based bugginess, may be worth your time.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Phantom: Covert Ops should be commended for its innovative core design. The 'tactical kayak' may sound contrived but it really works and brings something very unique to VR. While it feels natural to steer with your paddle and manage your inventory as you glide across the waterways, it's the higher-level gameplay and storytelling that's missing depth and detail. Though it's nice to have the addition of Free Play (where you get to select your own loadout) and Challenges (where you test your mettle in kayaking and shooting), we would have much preferred to see these beats carefully woven into the core gameplay than tacked on as padding. [Tested with Oculus Rift S]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Iron Man VR isn't perfect, but it's the most complete and compelling VR superhero game to date. Studio Camouflaj has crafted a experience which feels whole by successfully weaving unique VR gameplay with an iconic character and a worthwhile story. Most of the game's ideas are well executed—especially its break-neck yet comfortable flying mechanics—including a few unique moments which you might not have expected from this game.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Pixel Ripped 1995 does an awesome job of taking you to the mid-90s with its unique 'game within a game' style, this time however zeroing in on the 16-bit and early 32-bit games, albeit with some cleverly-built knockoff games that ultimately pay homage to the era. Although it's a bit rough around the edges, the interplay between the 'real' world and the game world make for a fun, mind-bending trip that really hits the mark.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Half-Life: Alyx is one of the most richly detailed and immersive VR games to date, and a stunning take on the iconic franchise for virtual reality; City 17 and the sci-fi conflict at its core are incredibly well-realized throughout. Though it's slower than the run-and-gun pace of the originals, Alyx feels like a Half-Life game through and through as it successfully shifts between combat, exploration, puzzles, and even some notable horror. While the game doesn't offer much in the way of mechanical innovation, and the roster of weapons and enemies left something to be desired, Valve has polished the game to a bright sheen, the result of which is an absolute must-play experience.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Walking Dead: Saints & Sinners is a slightly tuned-down RPG that's just begging to be bigger in size, although it didn't bite off too much in its quest to deliver an engrossing story, excellent physics-based zombie killing action, and an immersive atmosphere that feels as gritty and deadly serious as The Walking Dead comic books.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Budget Cuts 2 takes the series in a slightly different direction, as it puts more emphasis on straight-forward storytelling and conventional action. That said, it still offers up a nice slice of adrenaline-soaked fun, as you plan your way around instant death, but it may leave you wistful for the first's patently fresh outlook on life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The totality of the game lacks effective pacing as it bounces back and forth from puzzle to combat with little sense of synergy and no apparent climax. For those that are compelled by Boneworks' combat, the Arena and Sandbox modes offer up a great opportunity for extended gameplay, though we would have liked to see an emphasis on user-generated levels so that the community might flesh out concepts that didn't hit their stride in the campaign.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Although Star Wars Vader Immortal - Episode III is meant to be an exciting conclusion to the series, with massive robot battles, escapes down cavernous tunnels, and duels to the death, it's hard to feel too excited when these experiences crash head-first into its paint-by-numbers locomotion scheme and general lack of player-to-character interaction, which effectively muffles what should have been a resounding and climactic finish. It still however serves up one of the most visually stunning VR experiences to date, although its flaws ultimately compound in the third episode, making it somewhere between good and great.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Espire 1: VR Operative excels in delivering some familiar stealth combat in a new, more immersive package, albeit with a few hiccups along the way. In addition to its superhuman acrobatics, you may find Espire 1 a serviceable Metal Gear-style game, although it is still somewhat rough around the edges due to stupid AI, a standard but forgettable story, and a general lack of haptics and solid world geometry that might otherwise have sent this high-flying stealth combat game yet higher.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Stormland has delivered on its ambitious vision of making VR open-world adventuring a reality, thanks to smart design on both macro and micro scales. While there's some rough edges, the game brings enjoyable combat, innovative world traversal, and satisfying interactions to the table in a way rarely executed as well on their own, let alone together in a single experience. With fully-featured two-player co-op and the potential for long term replayability in the Cycling World, Stormland sets a new bar while at the same time laying out a well-formulated framework that will benefit VR games of the future.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By combining shooting, dodging, and rhythm, Pistol Whip gets you moving in a unique and compelling way. The game is at its best when it leads you into a strong sense of flow where dodging and shooting fuse into a cohesive dance. It isn't without occasional frustration—having your flow broken by seemingly unfair deaths can be annoying. A generous set of modifiers and options allow you to tweak the game in significant ways, especially the Dual Wield mode which changes (for the better, in my opinion) the way the game feels. Pistol Whip has undoubtedly strong fundamentals, though it seems like there's untapped potential waiting to be unlocked with better level mapping.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Asgard's Wrath may not offer the richest melee combat experience out there, but this epic Norse saga serves up a truly competent RPG that's not only strong in the visual department but is also packed with a full set of VR-native controls, something that's been so far missing in ported RPGs. There may be some wonkiness when it comes to object interaction, but the charming set pieces and excellent character design lend a level of immersion to this truly feature-length game that's hard to beat.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Star Wars Vader Immortal - Episode II continues the dark tale of Vader's search for immortality, and while it is just as well-conceived as the first, its main flaw is the lightning fast runtime of 30 minutes, which barely gives you enough time to get into the swing of using your new force powers before the credits roll. A second installment of the wave-based Lightsaber Dojo does an excellent job of keeping you entertained afterwards, although if you're just here for the story you may leave a bit disappointed.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Groundhog Day: Like Father Like Son may not feature the most engaging gameplay, or technically precise controls, however it delivers a hearty helping of genuine sincerity that definitely sticks with you. Tedium plays a fair part here, which can grate on your nerves, although it's definitely fitting considering the source material.

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