Softpedia's Scores

  • Games
For 698 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 21% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 Red Dead Redemption 2
Lowest review score: 20 Robotex
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 13 out of 698
699 game reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The Invisible Hand could have been a great if simplistic stock trading-focused game, if it dropped the satire elements, choosing to focus on how the market can be manipulated and on how rivalries develop between traders. The title could also have been a solid satire of modern wild capitalism and the way it lacks morals or compassion if it allowed itself to invest more in relationships and good dialogue and less in the actual stock-based gameplay. The problem is that the development team wants to deliver on both concepts and fails to reach the potential of either of them. The limited appeal of the presentation does not help with either of them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Resident Evil Village is one of the best entries in the series, hands down. It has some minor issues, but nothing to interfere with the overall experience. There are tons of extras and plenty of replay value from new levels of difficulty, to new weapons, challenges to the new Mercenary mode. You will have to discover this for yourself, along with the story, since we do not want to cross into spoiler territory. You can rest assured that although the innovations are not as obvious as in the case of Biohazard, Village refines the gameplay experience and fixes the shortcomings and critics of the previous episode. We highly recommend Resident Evil Village to all fans of video games.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    World Splitter has a killer core mechanic. The dimensional rift introduces a wide array of possibilities even in a relatively simple level. I spend a lot of time moving it around, seeing how it affects enemies and the environment, trying to see the best way it can help me get from left to right. The game also knows when and how to introduce new elements and twists to keep the gameplay fresh through the six big worlds. The problem is that discovery and experimentation are directly linked to failure and frustration. My rabbit dies repeatedly and sometimes I don’t exactly understand why, so I kill him some more to test out theories. After some time I understand what and how to do and finish a level with a decent result (the targets the game sets are for much better players). I only wished the development team offered more ways to cut down frustration to make more gamers enjoy World Splitter for longer periods.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Base One is a mostly solid game that never impresses. The story and writing are not a big part of the management genre but here they are so bland that they actively hurt the experience. Managing a space station is a chore when the narrative gives me no reason to look forward to new objectives and cool interactions. The game also feels limited by the fact that everything happens on one plane. A futuristic base will need to use space in complex ways and three dimensions to truly maximize efficiency and create a structure that can be easily defended or moved. Base One is too conservative in its take on the future, its approach to mechanics, and its story to create an experience that can keep gamers engaged with the campaign in the long term. The custom game mode offers ways to engage with all core mechanics in a variety of player-defined scenarios.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Poker Club is fully functional, but a totally bland experience. You have many gamification elements implemented on top of the actual poker game, like the customization options and the clubs. But these do not bring added value, since they do not have real effects on the gameplay experience. Having fixed most of the technical and visual bugs that plagued the initial release, Poker Club cannot overcome the issues that haunt all the poker simulators. The unpredictability of the human element brings tediousness and a slow pace, without being able to replicate the thrills of playing face to face with another human being.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Legends of Ellaria is one example of how too much ambition can lead to a hard to enjoy the final product. There’s simply too much here to have fun. The transitions are too long. The strategic layer does not add any sort of fun. The management can be enjoyable but does not mesh well with the rest of the experience.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Legend of Keepers is a good mix of ideas that could use some more variety. For the first 10 to 15 hours it has the pace and content to throw new ideas and new options out. It’s very fun to take down new groups of more powerful heroes and see what’s the best combination of monsters and traps to sap their spirit or to destroy their health points. The game also has plenty of long-term goals. But once I learned more about the monsters and the enemies I found it hard to get excited, even when I got a new powerful creature or when a powerful hero dropped in. Goblinz Studio understands the two genres it is mixing but it should have added a pinch more innovation to make Legend of Keepers into a long-term fun experience.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Buildings have feelings too! is based on a unique and interesting concept, but it falls short in execution. Those looking for a city management game will be disappointed since this is a puzzle game in a clever disguise. Despite the stylish visuals, the game overall feels like the victim of a limited budget and does not manage to reach its full potential. The game leaves little room for error and it is frustrating that it does not allow you to retry a specific chapter, rather it forces you to restart the entire game. Even if you like solving puzzles, the level of difficulty will be off-putting because they are paired with clunky controls.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Silicon Dreams has a good main concept and careful, expressive writing. Each scenario offers a dilemma to deal with. The situations are very emotional and the decisions are always challenging. Even after playing through a situation, I found something new to think about or to explore when the game made me return to it. Every fan of “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” or works influenced by it will find something to love in the tight experience that Clockwork Bird has designed. There is also plenty of space for them to expand both the story and the mechanics in meaningful ways in future titles set in the same universe.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you like horror adventure games, DARQ Complete Edition is definitely worth trying. If you played the game already, you can now replay it in its complete form with better framerates. If this is your first contact with DARQ, the Complete Edition offers the best experience possible. Still, it is hard to forgive the length, the lack of the story, and the fact that after you played or, replayed it once more, there is nothing more to do here. The atmosphere is special, the puzzles are well thought out, and the environment is very detailed, but each player has to decide for themselves how 2-3 hours of fun should translate into a price tag.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    If Disco Elysium The Final Cut would have been launched a bit later, with the subsequent patches already incorporated there would have been little to complain about. It is a masterpiece that needs to be played by every RPG fan out there. Despite the state the game was released in, the developers went through a lot of trouble to bring the experience they promised. Right now Disco Elysium The Final Cut is damn close to that vision. It is not often that I can forgive a messy launch, but the fixes that patched up things quite quickly and the experience itself outweighs any issues that are already in the past. If there was any game from the ones presented in a while that I wholeheartedly recommend, this is the one.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Ashwalkers has a few good ideas that it executes well. The problem is that the development team wants to make the game seem to be more than it actually is. If everything moved faster and with clearer decisions then it would be worth an extended time investment. As it stands after a first completed expedition I had no desire to try another. The characters stay the same and the management element never adds new twists. The end screen for each playthrough shows quite a few possible conclusions to work towards but the world never feels interesting enough to try and get them all. Unless you truly love slow, moody stories and choice-focused titles avoid Ashwalkers unless updates deliver a tighter, faster version of the experience.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall Superliminal is a great puzzle experience, and you feel throughout it that the developers had fun putting it together. This is a dream therapy that actually works, being funny and creative at the same time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Say No! More is an example of what a small team with a clear message and design direction can deliver. Studio Fizbin has crafted a short but happy game that explains why uttering a certain word is necessary and makes players feel powerful while saying it. I felt like a better human being after I finished it, even if it might not actually lead to more instances of “No” in my own life. There’s a little bit too much earnestness in the writing at times, especially during the final third, but once one buys into the premise it is easy to get past it. Say No! More talks about the importance of choice and self-expression and curious players should ignore its thesis and say “Yes” to this narrative-driven experience.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Everything that Capcom included in Monster Hunter Rise feels like it's been curated by a perfectionist. The soundtrack, visuals, gameplay mechanics, monster-hunting loop, and multiplayer have been thoroughly designed to offer players the ultimate Monster Hunter experience on a handheld device. With a little bit more investment in the narrative, Monster Hunter Rise could have been a perfect game. Without that it's just one of the best games in the series, a must-play title for every Nintendo Switch owner. I'm amazed that after two incredible Monster Hunter games, Capcom still finds a way to outdo itself and push out another nearly perfect monster-hunting title.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Signs of the Sojourner presents itself as a contemporary art piece, where the truth and the beauty are in the eye of the beholder. It is carefully put together, it conveys a series of messages and it is based on an original concept. Unfortunately, it fails to create harmony between the gameplay and the story, so the result feels fractured. The story is too slow, the card play is not engaging enough, and the gap between the two elements is never actually bridged. Signs of the Sojourner remains a bizarre experiment, that had potential, but where the artists stumbled being tripped by their own feet.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Lost Words: Beyond the Page is a great story with minimalistic gameplay. It feels that through the entire game the developers focused mainly on the diary, Estoria being more of an afterthought. Still, overall, the magic is there and the game is worth a playthrough especially by young adults. There are some original and innovative ideas in the game, but in the end, is a very casual experience. Those who love a good story will love Lost Words: Beyond the Page. But those who are looking for deep gameplay, have nothing to see here.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Nanotale – Typing Chronicles manages to put words at the heart of both the action and the story in a unique way. The centrality of typing is justified in the world that the developers have created and makes for some interesting challenges for gamers. The more classic exploration elements, based around the word magic system, also work well. The biggest problem is that the constant keyboard action can become a little tiring. Keep sessions to a little under an hour to make sure that you do not simply burn out from spelling. Nanotale is also a video game that would benefit immensely from an investment in a very good keyboard.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Black Legend is a game that has potential but fails to fulfill enough of it to keep a player interested. The tactical, hex and turn-based, battles are good. The humors are intriguing. But the game offers nothing to make them meaningful.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Paradise Lost is a story worth exploring once, the alternative ending targeting those who were roped in by the story and the character development of Szymon. Sadly, there won’t be too many, because despite the strong start, the magic fades and ultimately Paradise Lost proves to be a walking simulator that could have been very interesting in theory, but actually it is just conventional and flat.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    El Hijo A Wild West Tale is a stealth game that also tries to juggle puzzle elements, and the balance is lost along the way. It is not a bad game, but one that starts you hiding in the environment, but by the end of your adventure, you will remember mostly the puzzles. It teases you with all the possible approaches but does not grant you enough freedom to actually put them into action. Although it targets the whole family, it can be recommended only for those who are looking for the challenge due to the steep difficulty level. Still, El Hijo A Wild West Tale radiates candor and innocence, two qualities that recommend it to everyone.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Redout: Space Assault is a relatively simple game that satisfies some very arcade itches. Taking out enemies while dodging waves of attacks and finding some time to take stock of the situation can be exhilarating. But in its current form, the mechanics are simply too limited to make the game engaging for more than a few hours. Its phone-based origin is clear. The big battles are, at first, fun and exciting. But the fourth or fifth time when almost the same scenarios appear it is hard to summon the energy to do it all again. More variety is needed to make this on-tails space combat experience attractive in the long term.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Star Renegades although borrows many elements from other games, manages to feel fresh and entertaining. It offers plenty of content, and though you will have to go through several attempts to crack it, the game manages to avoid feeling repetitive. The deep combat system, the different heroes, the procedurally generated maps, the different difficulty levels all contribute to the high replay value of the game. Star Renegades builds on the nostalgic factor and is targeting mainly the fans of TBT, but it proves to be enjoyable by anyone who decides to try it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Neurodeck is an engaging take on the deck-builder genre. The enemies are varied, the cards have cool synergies, the runs in their entirety integrate combat and other activities well. Some difficulty spikes feel unfair. The good news is there are no opponents that cannot be taken down with good card selection and battle strategy. The game does not have the breath or innovation of the best of its class. But the focus on phobia, mental health, and stress make it an interesting experiment. Neurodeck shows how you can create a video game that offers information about the real world without looking preachy while also offering good core mechanics.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Newcomers to the franchise will find Battle Brothers very hard to pick up, especially due to the lack of a proper tutorial. I do love those games that don't hold your hand, but I think Battle Brothers is in a league of its own and some more complex aspects should be made more clear. Although the learning curve is quite steep, once you get the hang of it, Battle Brothers is actually a very enjoyable experience. I strongly recommend those looking for a challenging turn-based RPG to give Battle Brothers a try, not just for the complexity of building the perfect company of brothers, but also for its stunning soundtrack and art style.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Hot Brass is an intriguing game that restricts its ability to keep players engaged. The SWAT fantasy is well transferred into mechanics but the overall look of the game makes it hard to fully enjoy. The missions are designed for multiple approaches but different ways of engaging with the title do not deliver a variety of thrills or failures. The focus on real-time action is probably the biggest drawback because it undermines the importance of planning. While the pressure and tension work well the top-down action title is too confusing at times. Trying for an objective, again and again, becomes frustrating.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The developers have nailed the sense of progression and the tension that the genre is built around. The presentation is very old-school, which can be a problem for players who have never interacted with MS-DOS titles. It is also integral to the spirit of this game. Loop Hero is a great game for fans of its genre and has plenty of cool mechanics and hooks for those who want to try it out for the first time.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Monster Jam Steel Titans 2 is fun, at least for a couple of hours. After that, you will not be inclined to run the game again, because you will already have figured out everything it has to offer. It feels like even the developers designed the game as a temporary distraction, aware that the magic quickly fades out. It is only a small improvement compared to the first Monster Jam Steel Titans and even with a more modest price tag and online multiplayer, it is hard to recommend for someone. Monster Jam Steel Titans 2 is way too arcade for the fans of the sport and offers very little to anyone else.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Atelier Ryza 2 brings new, interesting gameplay features into the series, but it doesn't revolutionize the Atelier franchise. The alchemy system hasn't been simplified, but it's much easier to pick up if you're a newcomer to the series. There are new biomes to explore thanks to the introduction of the swimming and mount abilities, but the balance between combat, alchemy, and exploration is what makes Atelier Ryza 2 an enjoyable experience. There's no doubt about it, Ryza 2 is the most refined experience you can get playing an Atelier game as long as you're not expecting a top-notch story. Aside from the lighthearted tone, nothing stands out when it comes to Atelier Ryza 2's story; it's as generic as it can be and there's nothing wrong with that.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Sword of the Necromancer is a game that will scratch a very particular itch for fans of rogue-lite experiences that feature more narrative than the genre is known for. The gameplay mechanics deliver one cool idea, the monster resurrection, but fail to make full use of it, especially when players need to deal with bosses or the more capable enemies of later levels. I wanted the game to give me more reasons to use the monsters I revived, to understand them, to build strategies around the ones I chose to carry around. The development team clearly understands how important is to ground players into a narrative. But they need to make sure that there’s deeper integration between the world and the gameplay to create a successful rogue-lite. Right now Sword of the Necromancer is like one of its monsters, intriguing at first but quickly dropped when it no longer seems useful.

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