Softpedia's Scores

  • Games
For 854 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 Red Dead Redemption 2
Lowest review score: 20 Robotex
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 13 out of 854
855 game reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Floppy Knights has a clear mechanical core and executes it well. The tactical and card puzzles of the levels are well-designed, with plenty of scope for experimentation and moments of surprise. Making progress can be surprisingly hard, given its cute presentation, for players who don’t examine enemy capabilities and prepare potential moves at least one turn in advance. But the core concepts are not innovative in any meaningful ways. The narrative space does what it can to add reasons to move forward but, despite their bubbly nature, Phoebe and Carlton don’t have much depth. Rose City Games understands the mix of genres it is working with but needs to take more risks to stand out in an already crowded space.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Eternal Threads has an intriguing idea at its core and its small scope means that it can introduce a lot of detail to a situation, challenging players to find out everything they can before making choices. It will be interesting to see if gamers actually connect with the characters as written or if they don’t bother to get the best outcomes for the entire cast. The biggest issue with the game is that it asks for an investment of time and emotion that the narrative might be unable to support. Gameplay is both limited and repetitive, which means that the universe needs to carry all the weight of engagement. Eternal Threads has potential in terms of storytelling but it does need a little more than a solid premise to keep players watching.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    orbit.industries is a good management experience that will appeal to anyone who has ever sketched a space station in a notebook or thought about the complexities of building in orbit. Its three core systems might not seem too deep, taken individually, but they interact to create satisfying complexity. It is hard but cool to put together a space station that functions as close to optimal as possible and also looks suitably sci-fi. But the game doesn’t seem to aim to expand to audiences that don't already loves this genre. The presentation is functional but never pushes past that. There’s little world-building to create a sense of immersion. orbit.industries is a clear sign that LAB132 know their mechanics but they need to work on their ability to create a sense of wonder to attract a wider slate of players.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Farm Manager 2022 is a fascinating title that has just one problem: it doesn’t necessarily play well with consoles. I’m not talking about graphics or gameplay but about the controlling system, as this genre makes more sense on a PC where the mouse input is much more natural. But at the end of the day, Farm Manager is, as I said, not only a major upgrade over its predecessor but also a great way to see what the life of a farmer is all about. And since you end up learning a lot by simply playing it, no matter if we’re talking about crops, animals, logistics, or machinery, Farm Manager 22 is definitely worth trying out.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Citizen Sleeper creates a strong universe and gives the main character an engaging story with plenty of choices. Erlin’s Eye feels like a small part of a well-designed narrative space that can support more exploration. The visual design fits in with the wider themes of the game and the characters never become preachy. The problem is that the developer also cares about gameplay and the concept of investing for a result. The dice system is adequate enough, but everything takes so long and requires too many clicks. Citizen Sleeper would have probably worked better as a more classic visual novel, with the resources assigned to mechanics re-routed to deliver more story.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Overall, the folks at Complex Games have done a great job adapting one of the most popular tabletop games in the world and turning it into a video game. Ironically, Warhammer 40,000: Chaos Gate – Daemonhunters feels like the natural evolution of the XCOM franchise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Kaiju Wars is the sort of video game that understands that huge monsters make for incredible threats, which in turn allows players to derive a lot of satisfaction from stopping them in their tracks. The game has the narrative, the mechanics, the scenario design, and the presentation to keep gamers always engaged, guessing how they can pick up an extra medal or tackle a mission on Hard. The development team has been quick to react to player feedback, adding more options. And I hope that they will also introduce more scenarios and, maybe, a few extra mega-monsters to deal with. Kaiju Wars is not revolutionary, but it delivers a tight strategy package that celebrates its inspirations while spoofing them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Trek to Yomi makes a great first impression. The black and white, combined with the first uses of the combat system, suggests an experience that will allow players to step into the sandals of a samurai. The story might not be extraordinary but there’s enough sentiment in it to keep players engaged. But combat quickly reveals itself to be repetitive, with little need to experiment or to use all the combos. And the presentation does not enhance the gameplay, even if it delivers good screenshots. Trek to Yomi has some good ideas but never uses them to their full potential, which is a shame given its initial promise.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    King Arthur: Knight’s Tale is a clear departure from the King Arthur titles that Neocore Games is known for. It’s not just the new setting, but also the combat mechanics and the management aspect of your base of operations that makes the game very engaging. Although I’d hoped King Arthur: Knight’s Tale would be something different than what we’re used to, I certainly didn’t expect it to be so good. If you’re a fan of turn-based strategy games and love a compelling, yet dark story, I can’t recommend King Arthur: Knight’s Tale enough, it’s an exceptional game.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Galactic Civilizations IV has a solid foundation, in terms of mechanics and presentation, but needs to add polish. I like the wide-ranging customization offered at the start of a campaign and how the early game moves. But the experience needs more excitement for the middle game and extra variety in terms of events and challenges. The title is too sculpted to suit the tastes of those who has picked up the previous two titles in the series. It rewards solid planning and careful execution; it asks players to learn the connections between mechanics and to exploit them. But to truly flourish, Galactic Civilizations IV needs to try to add a little revolution to its evolution-driven approach to turn-based strategy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I’m not sure that the narrative element of the game works as well as the presentation and the focus on choices. But Trolley Problem, Inc. is a quick, enthusiastic, and very different experience, compared to what the medium mostly delivers, and I encourage players to take a few hours out of a week to see what it has to offer.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The story is there just to make you mildly interested in the game, which is kind of disappointing. Such an interesting world truly deserves much more exposition and deeper characterization of the cast, but if you’re looking for these traits in Ghostwire: Tokyo, you’re not going to find them. What you’ll find though is an interesting eerie world and lots of Western-like gunplay where you’ll be using your fingers to spit out psychic abilities rather than bullets, and that’s perfectly fine.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Royal Frontier is a simple game that can serve as an introduction to the rogue space but does not have the unique or interesting elements of the best of its genre. Combat is interesting at first but becomes rote very quickly. Unlocking new blessings does not feel important or cool enough to keep players engaged. But this could still be a slightly fun rogue and combat experience if it weren’t for the QTEs. They cannot be avoided, add little to the gameplay, and make everything take a lot more time than it should. Rogue Frontier understands what makes its chosen genre interesting for players but fails to introduce any unique mechanics of its own.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Insurmountable gains a new gameplay layer with the 2.0 update, which gives the experience a clearer structure and players more clear goals to aim for. Climbing peaks, with limited resources and careful planning, continues to be compelling. There are plenty of strategies to try out, many events to deal with, some mysteries to untangle. The problem is that there’s not enough variety, even with the newly added campaign structure. After 5 or 6 climbs, nothing is surprising. The player can try new synergies or new ideas, but the mountains remain largely the same. Insurmountable has a great concept and some solid mechanics but can struggle to entice players to reach more than one summit.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Circle Empires Tactics is an interesting take on strategy, with a focus on small engagements and careful preparation. I like the fact that the options to restart an engagement is always available, allowing players to try out ideas and push for success. The repetitive nature of the entire experience can only succeed if the price for failure is small and the developers understand this. The problem with the game is that, apart from love of its mechanics, there’s nothing to keep gamers engaged with the singleplayer. The lore is limited and there’s not enough variety. The game is more interesting in multiplayer, where humans can deliver some cool tactical moments. Circle Empires Tactics has some good ideas but needs more depth to appeal to modern strategy lovers.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the optimization issues, the network problems with the Shift servers that cause momentarily framerate drops, the fact that there are some unexplainable crashes and various bugs, Tiny Tina’s Wonderlands is a truly wonderful experience for all Borderlands fans. It is different enough, so veterans won’t see it just a reskin, and familiar enough to get lost in the game world. The voice acting is the best up to date, with a tremendous performance from actors like Will Arnett. Tina’s voice is Ashly Burch, who gives a very different performance here compared to Horizon’s Alloy. Tiny Tina’s Wonderlands has plenty of issues and there is room for improvement, but it is a good game with plenty to keep you entertained.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nightmare Reaper is a good retro FPS experience that will be incredibly satisfying to all gamers who liked the genre since Wolfenstein and have kept up with its recent evolution. Shooting enemies, juggling weapons, and looking for secrets, all these ideas work well. There’s enough difficulty to make progress a challenge without too much frustration and death is never the end. The biggest obstacle to a bigger audience will be the graphics. I understand why developers choose this pixelated, low-fidelity approach and I like it in small doses. But it might drive some players who are used to more modern graphics away. Nightmare Reaper might not be for everyone but fans can look forward to tens of hours of enjoyable FPS action.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Forgive Me Father is a good first-person shooter that, despite embracing the retro concept, does not rely on nostalgia to draw players in. I played it relatively cautiously, conserving ammo when I could, and I didn’t feel like the madness system worked against me. But the game is at its best in the big arena fights, with big groups of enemies, a shredding soundtrack, and no option but to take the fight to them. The limited narrative works well for it, mostly because players can focus on the combat and on how they can improve their performance. The game should deliver more combat arenas and fewer jumping puzzles, but overall Forgive Me Father is one of the best retro FPS experiences of the moment.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At the end of the day, Agent Intercept is a fun game to try on a rainy weekend day, but I don’t think too many people would play it again after completing the story mode. And unfortunately, this doesn’t take more than a few hours once you learn how to be a lethal agent.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Weird West has a great set of gameplay mechanics that don’t always deliver the best experience. The five-character stories have great moments, although the side-quests are often more engaging. You can take down an important enemy in three ways or more, but the chaotic aftermath might be impossible to handle. Using all the money obtained from a job to replace bullets and medicine is not a way to make progress. But I appreciated the interaction between systems, the way the world reacts to player actions, and the many unexpected encounters. Weird West does have frustrating elements but it offers the kind of experience that’s rare in modern games, one filled with surprises, mysteries, and consequences.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Beholder 3 has a few good ideas that fail to shine through the limited and repetitive mechanics. Some conversations, especially some with family members, elicit emotion and create genuine dilemmas. But I never was interested in the tenants, their problems, or my co-workers, and always played Frank as a survivor who can’t and won’t try to make the world a better place. I like how this actually fits well into the totalitarian framework of the game’s world. But much of my detachment is also linked to the mechanics, repetitive and lacking imagination, which eliminated emotion. Beholder 3 delivers a world worth exploring but fails to give the players the means to get engaging moments from it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Gunborg: Dark Matters is in many ways a fun game not only for those who have already fallen in love with platformers but also for those who are new to this genre. In many, it’s a fun yet extremely challenging side scroller whose only shortcoming appears to be the very short story and the weird control system that takes some time to get used to. However, Gunborg is the kind of game that more or less grows on you as you give it more time. You may not be too impressed at first if you’re already a diehard platformer gamer but the more you play it, the more you discover its exciting side.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Ascent is far from perfect. It has so many issues that normally I would not give it a second look. Despite all the issues and the fact that the gameplay is pretty basic, the story completely forgettable and it lacks any depth, I had fun with it and once I started playing it I was lost to the rest of the world. It is more a twin stick shooter adorned tackily with superfluous RPG elements. It is raw, unrefined and basic, but the atmosphere and the overall experience recommends The Ascent as a game that is worth a shot after a few patches and a serious discount.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    35mm tries hard to be more than just a walking simulator. It stumbles in this endeavor and forgets that a good walking simulator can still be a pretty entertaining experience. The game falls short of the experience offered by popular titles in the same genre like Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture or What Remains of Edith Finch. If you find yourself on a rainy weekend, looking for some brooding, short and not exactly challenging experience, 35mm might be worth a try thanks to its atmosphere. Otherwise, there are much more enjoyable and memorable walking simulators out there.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The Last Cube is a solid puzzle and platforming mix, with a focus on solid planning and careful execution. I like the pure nature of moving through the levels, constantly trying to keep in mind which face of the cube can interact with what element of the environment. But this is an experience enjoyed in small doses before the drabness of the universe gets to you. The narrative is the weakest part of the game, which would have been overlooked a few years ago. But the genre is getting increasingly crowded. The Last Cube can have good ideas and implementation but it also needed an interesting universe and better presentation to stand out.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    République is proof that mobile games can have depth and can be as complex as their PC or console counterparts. Despite the many improvements it brings, the Anniversary Edition cannot shed its touch screen heritage and the control on the gamepad is still cumbersome. The possibility to control Hope directly subtracts from the initial innovative experience, without offering a real added benefit. The five chapters offer around 15 hours of mixed experience, where fun will alternate with frustration. République: Anniversary Edition is a game that can thoroughly enjoyed only by the fans of older stealth games, like the classic Metal Gear Solid.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Young Souls is a solid beat-em up that intelligently adds role-playing ideas to enhance its core gameplay. The bosses are well-designed and mostly fun to fight, especially if the player wisely diversified what the pair can do. The narrative is not groundbreaking but gives players plenty of interesting moments and cool banter (again, with plenty of swearing that can be filtered out). Players should not be afraid of dropping the difficulty level if they feel the game is too hard. And experimentation, when it comes to both equipment and tactics, can solve plenty of combat puzzles. Young Souls is fast, engaging, deep enough, a good example of how a classic genre can be updated for modern sensibilities.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Normally, I’d say that Dawn of Ragnarok is just more Assassin’s Creed, but in a different environment and with different enemies. However, I do believe it’s time for Ubisoft to get rid of the Assassin’s Creed naming scheme from everything related to Eivor’s Viking saga. I think this is just piggybacking on the Assassin’s Creed franchise without bringing anything new into the mix. Despite all of that, Assassin’s Creed fans will find Dawn of Ragnarok an enjoyable experience. There are plenty of new activities and the main story is decent for the most part. The new powers look more impressive on paper rather than in-game, but props to Ubisoft for trying. My advice is to play this like a brand-new game rather than an Assassin’s Creed expansion, although it will be hard to get past the series’ dull grind mechanics, which are quite present in Dawn of Ragnarok too.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Hero’s Hour shows how compelling and fun the Heroes of Might & Magic formula can be when a developer gets the core mechanics right. It takes a little time to get used to the real-time battles and the limited direct control, but the formula works well and delivers interesting choices and solid challenges. There’s a lot of variety when it comes to both maps and setup options, while the AI knows how to play to win. The only thing I feel is missing is a core campaign that uses the mechanics and the factions. Even without it, players who love the genre will spend a lot of time exploring the variety on offer and finding the best strategic approach for each side. Hero’s Hour might seem derivative at first but it is a joy to play.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Distant Worlds 2 is a rich space-based, real-time strategy experience that can provide hundreds of hours of fun to a dedicated fan. The writing and narrative aren’t interesting enough but the mechanics more than make-up for this weakness. The automation options are deep and make it easier to focus on certain aspects of the 4X concept, delegating the rest to a decent computer algorithm. But before anyone jumps into Distant Worlds 2, they should set aside time and patience. Make extensive use of the in-game help, read forums if you need to, delegate a lot at first, and only engage with what you like. Code Force has delivered a solid strategy package, which means updates and DLC can only improve it and add accessibility and fun.

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