• Network: HULU
  • Series Premiere Date: Feb 14, 2020
Metascore
69

Generally favorable reviews - based on 26 Critic Reviews

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 26
  2. Negative: 1 out of 26

Where To Watch

Stream On

Critic Reviews

  1. Reviewed by: Allison Shoemaker
    Feb 14, 2020
    90
    Empathetic, textured, funny, surprising, and affectionate reimagining.
  2. Reviewed by: Judy Berman
    Feb 3, 2020
    90
    While it’s hard to imagine rooting for Cusack’s dour, womanizing Rob 20 years later, this revision works. ... What’s even more satisfying is how a change in casting shifts the meaning of Hornby and Frears’ stories. ... In a blow against essentialism, these characters are multifaceted human beings before they’re representatives of their gender, race or sexual orientation.
  3. Reviewed by: Kelly Lawler
    Feb 14, 2020
    88
    "Fidelity" works as a new take on a well-known story while standing on its own. Elements from the book and film are playfully reimagined here. ... The writing is sharp and concise, and at 10 half-hour episodes, it feels exactly the right length.
  4. Reviewed by: Steve Greene
    Feb 14, 2020
    83
    Viewers expecting a tight, compact album might be pleasantly surprised to see this season take on a more open-ended Spotify playlist feel, designed to keep playing and be enjoyed knowing that the end is still far in the future. At times, it’s an eclectic mix of ideas and execution, but there’s a great amount of satisfaction in just letting it all wash over you.
  5. Reviewed by: Dave Nemetz
    Feb 11, 2020
    83
    By the time Episode 5 rolls around, with the great Parker Posey guest-starring as a kooky artist looking to unload her cheating husband’s mega valuable record collection, High Fidelity has established a funky, unassuming charm all its own. It’s kind of like your favorite local dive bar: nothing too flashy, but a reliable combination of fun people, a killer jukebox and good vibes.
  6. Reviewed by: Gwen Ihnat
    Feb 7, 2020
    83
    The series sets up myriad intriguing possibilities and wows with enough stellar soundtrack songs and pop culture-laden dialogue to keep us on the hook for more. By the final episodes, the previous High Fidelity seems less like a copied original and more like an inspired springboard to enable a more engaging character to improve her life and herself.
  7. Reviewed by: Erica Campbell
    Feb 4, 2020
    83
    Yes, she’s insufferable, and yes there are times I had to press pause from second-hand embarrassment to yell at the screen, “WHAT ARE YOU DOING ROB?”, but as a woman of color who once cried over the mere thought of someone taking her Led Zeppelin records post-breakup, it was nice to feel seen for once. Besides, even in her problematic self-indulgence, there’s something in Kravitz’s portrayal of Rob that makes you feel for her.
  8. Reviewed by: Krutika Mallikarjuna
    Feb 3, 2020
    81
    With Kravitz stepping into the role of Rob, now a queer black woman who owns a record store in Brooklyn, High Fidelity becomes a much more sincere project. By the very nature of the generational shift to millennials – and the change in leads – Hulu's adaptation has nary an ironic bone in sight.
  9. Reviewed by: John Anderson
    Feb 13, 2020
    80
    “High Fidelity”—both then and now—is about the timeless, vicarious narrative charms of any secret society/gang/club/superhero team. The insiders are outsiders and eccentrics who possess superpowers. In “High Fidelity,” the superpowers are in their ears. Their consequent oddities and obsessions only make them more endearing. Ms. Kravitz is particularly so, most of the time. ... If nothing else, the show drops its needle on a certain millennial hipster groove, without losing touch with its Gen X ancestor.
  10. Reviewed by: Matthew Gilbert
    Feb 13, 2020
    80
    It’s a slow-growing pleasure that does justice to them bones. ... After the rocky first half of the season, Kravitz becomes a fine lead, with a winning mixture of hipness, sadness, and loyalty. She is a woman who can be a creep — but because she knows it, she radiates the possibility that she can change. Chill, quietly charismatic, she ultimately makes for a great hang.
  11. Reviewed by: Kristi Turnquist
    Feb 12, 2020
    80
    In addition to Kravitz’s performance, the most enjoyable elements of “High Fidelity” are the music (good luck getting “Come on Eileen” out of your mind after the first episode), the glamorized sense of place (Brooklyn comes off as a gentrification postcard), and the R-rated but totally entertaining back-and-forth between Rob and her record-store employees, Simon (David H. Holmes) and Cherise (Da’Vine Joy Randolph).
  12. Reviewed by: Jen Chaney
    Feb 7, 2020
    80
    In keeping with High Fidelity’s musical sensibilities, it seems correct to describe the show not as a remake but as an interesting, fun cover of the classic original.
  13. Reviewed by: LaToya Ferguson
    Feb 5, 2020
    80
    The series is a love letter to its source material, to the music that plays throughout, to New York City (with a gentrification undercurrent within the season), and even to the rom-com genre.
  14. Reviewed by: Meghan O'Keefe
    Feb 3, 2020
    80
    High Fidelity uses its brilliant cast, sharp writing, and hypnotically cool set design to examine how relationships have and haven’t changed in the modern era.
  15. Reviewed by: Alan Sepinwall
    Feb 3, 2020
    80
    Rob is arguably the quintessential John Cusack role, but Kravitz winningly steps into those shoes. ... Even if this TV mixtape of High Fidelity misses some fundamental ideas behind the source material, it's still a delight. [Feb 2020, p.86]
  16. Reviewed by: Richard Roeper
    Feb 11, 2020
    75
    Just when it seems like Rob might be a little too cool for school, she wins us over with her childlike eating habits (she’s forever spooning “meals” from a bowl) and her openness about how silly and stupid and irrational she has sometimes behaved in the name of love.
  17. Reviewed by: Willa Paskin
    Feb 13, 2020
    70
    High Fidelity has many charms. But it does also have a recurring dissonance, a bunch of vestigial generational and dude behaviors that make the record skip.
  18. Reviewed by: Robert Lloyd
    Feb 3, 2020
    70
    The scenes that serve this theme [come to terms with the serial failures of her romantic life] are fine, and often funny. ... The romantic narrative is less interesting than Rob’s scenes with Simon and Cherise, or their scenes without her. Randolph is the show’s stealth star, as Jack Black, in the analogous part, was in the film. ... But it’s all well-played, good-looking, enjoyable modern light entertainment, with a side of social satire. I’m inclined to recommend it.
  19. Reviewed by: Margaret Lyons
    Feb 14, 2020
    60
    I get that the main character is afraid to commit, but her show seems afraid to commit, too. At 10 episodes, it still feels superficial — beautiful, certainly, with an aesthetic that’s glowy but never sweaty, but vague.
  20. Reviewed by: Adrian Horton
    Feb 14, 2020
    60
    The result is a show which is sometimes grating yet sneakily beguiling, in the way that beautiful, curated messiness can be.
  21. Reviewed by: Daniel D'Addario
    Feb 3, 2020
    60
    The story needs more help than Kravitz can give it, leaning on a fairly simple and uninteresting sort-of-love-triangle (she misses her ex, who is now engaged to someone else) that would not exist without coincidence and fairly unbelievable behavior on the part of all parties. ... Sometimes, though, this (despite it all!) very watchable show snaps into being something more.
  22. Reviewed by: Robert Levin
    Feb 18, 2020
    50
    The creators of this "High Fidelity" TV series fail to expand on the material to the point where 10 episodes can be sustained.
  23. Reviewed by: Kristen Lopez
    Feb 14, 2020
    40
    High Fidelity may have a rollicking soundtrack, both on-screen and in its pace, but its depth is fairly shallow.
  24. Reviewed by: Hank Stuever
    Feb 13, 2020
    40
    The cynical prickliness of the material — along with Rob’s incessant fourth-wall narration, describing her woe-is-me mismanagement of her own feelings — is too easily recognizable as a forgery.
  25. Reviewed by: Troy Patterson
    Feb 6, 2020
    40
    “High Fidelity” has always concerned itself with nostalgia for youthful heartbreak, but, this time around, the mists of memory haze obscure the hero. The show unfolds in some atemporal nostalgia zone; Rob seems like a middle-aged person’s idealized view of a heartbroken young person. The song remains the same, but the playback device is somehow obsolete.
  26. Reviewed by: Inkoo Kang
    Feb 3, 2020
    30
    Nearly every major decision, from the premise to the casting to the grueling callbacks to the film, is a fumble. The show isn't just unnecessary; it's a largely soulless cover that doesn't understand what made the original distinctive. Perhaps most dispiritingly, the marvelous wit and poignancy of the two episodes whose storylines appear to be wholly invented by the show's writers suggest that a great deal of talent was wasted on trying to give life to a seemingly DOA concept.
User Score
6.7

Generally favorable reviews- based on 18 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 18
  2. Negative: 5 out of 18
  1. Feb 16, 2020
    9
    The original High Fidelity film has a massive cult following so this new reinterpretation would have its detractors by critics and film buffs.The original High Fidelity film has a massive cult following so this new reinterpretation would have its detractors by critics and film buffs. But dare i say it, its much better then the film and can see a second season happening (it would be welcome to see development with characters). Pace wise, twists and turns of all the main characters are relevant in regards to ambition of adults, growing up in your 20s "Cool,party going,freedom to not care" dragging reluctantly into your 30s responsibilities of marriage, engagement and parenthood. The subtle ridiculing of the vacuous social media generation, and the way the gentrification of New York has occurred sadly is poignant too. Zoé Kravitz suits this new "Rob" in an ideal role as a record shop owner and how music shapes her life and knowledge of music bordering on the obsessive. The sub characters seem at plain hipsters or wannabes but are all social outcasts by not being the stereotype in race or by gender identity and whilst revolving around Robs selfish messed up universe. Even deep down if they do find her to be a lost cause sometimes but as episodes develop you see more to find out about making the interlink between episodes intriguing. Without giving much away with spoilers it follows the film in a basic thread but its more developed and I hope it will be a success as it deserves to be... Full Review »