Full Throttle Remastered Image
Metascore
76

Generally favorable reviews - based on 17 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.3

Mixed or average reviews- based on 40 Ratings

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  • Summary: Released by LucasArts in 1995, Full Throttle is a classic graphic adventure game from Tim Schafer, telling the story of Ben Throttle butt-kicking leader of biker gang the Polecats, who gets caught up in a tale of Motorcycles, Mayhem and Murder. Now over 20 years later, Full Throttle is backReleased by LucasArts in 1995, Full Throttle is a classic graphic adventure game from Tim Schafer, telling the story of Ben Throttle butt-kicking leader of biker gang the Polecats, who gets caught up in a tale of Motorcycles, Mayhem and Murder. Now over 20 years later, Full Throttle is back in a remastered edition featuring all new hand-drawn and 3D high-resolution artwork, with remastered audio and music.
    Players can switch back and forth between classic and remastered modes, and mix and match audio, graphics and user interface to their heart’s desire. The've also included a concept art browser, and recorded a commentary track with the game’s original creators. [Playstation.com]
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PlayStation Store - PLAY Collective Weekly Releases - Spring 2017
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 17
  2. Negative: 0 out of 17
  1. Apr 28, 2017
    95
    If I do a top games of 2017 list at the end of the year, I can already tell you that Full Throttle Remastered will be on it. This is point and click adventure gaming done right during the best and brightest days of the genre. Double Fine has done a superb job remastering and re-releasing it; don’t miss it.
  2. Apr 18, 2017
    90
    Full Throttle Remastered is essentially the perfect rework of a classic. Barring a couple of minor issues, LucasArts’ old title has been brought up to modern standards by Double Fine, boasting a brand new look that gives a lot of vibrant detail while maintaining the things that earned Full Throttle its reputation in the first place. It’s clear that Double Fine put a lot of effort into this project, not least because of how important the game is to Tim Schafer, but it’s a great game regardless. Whether you’re a seasoned veteran or an adventure game newcomer, if you’re looking for a game that provides a fun experience with a well executed story then you should get Full Throttle Remastered.
  3. Apr 19, 2017
    80
    There’s no getting around that Full Throttle is a 22-year-old adventure game and still plays like it. The puzzles are occasionally frustrating. Your character moves at a slow pace, and some of cultural humor is outdated. Still, the quirks of the original game are as attractive today as they were then, and this version does a fine job smoothing out the rough edges, making Full Throttle Remastered a road trip worth taking.
  4. 80
    Full Throttle Remastered is a no-nonsense package that does exactly what it sets out to do by updating the audiovisual experience whilst retaining the original game. It has its faults, borne of its age and shift towards what would become the modern adventure game style, but it remains a fine game, and an important part of the history of point n’ click adventures.
  5. May 17, 2017
    77
    Quotation forthcoming.
  6. 70
    Full Throttle Remastered is a great example of a remaster done well with loads of added extras and different ways to tailor how you play it. Adventure games are a niche corner of the market nowadays though and I doubt if this will have broad appeal to attract the attention of anyone other than fans, but for fans this is pretty much all you could ask for.
  7. Apr 20, 2017
    60
    The one LucasArts game that didn’t need a remaster gets one anyway, but it can’t do anything for the game’s brevity or lack of challenge.

See all 18 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of 1
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Jun 4, 2018
    6
    You either buy into this game's premise or you don't. It's a point-and-click adventure game, a genre that was never particularly popular,You either buy into this game's premise or you don't. It's a point-and-click adventure game, a genre that was never particularly popular, even in its heyday. It's set in a dystopian post-apocalypse in which petrol-based vehicles have been overtaken by electric hover cars. The voice acting is utterly superb and the script is extremely witty, with lots of great in-jokes (for Star Wars fans on most occasions). The original game had, for its day, she incredible visuals, a mixture of great pixel art with occasional 3D-rendered models. The music/soundtrack is about as appropriate as you can imagine; The Gone Jackals may not be terribly well-known, but their biker rock is absolutely spot on for this adventure.

    What you're getting on PS4 (and other platforms) is the exact same game, but with an updated art style in 16:9 (the original was 4:3) and remastered audio. You can switch seamlessly between the two (by pressing the touchpad on the PS4 controller). Switching to the original visual style also switches to the original audio quality.

    The new art style is unfortunately a bit of a letdown, looking a like the kind of Flash animations we used to see in websites of the early 2000s. The huge missed opportunity is for the original pixel art to be extended to 16:9, or an option that doubles/quadruples the pixels while retaining the original look. This is particularly noticeable in the Mine Road section, where the grittiness of the original is replaced by an overly bright aesthetic that would look more at home in a Roadrunner cartoon. It's as if whoever was in charge of this remaster had failed to notice how popular pixel art is in the late 2010's.

    There's also an annoying and entirely superfluous spinning CD icon that appears in the top left of the screen every time you start a new dialogue with a character. Not a dealbreaker, but certainly something that shows a distinct lack of finesse.

    Absolutely nothing else about this game has been updated or improved, besides an optional "Director's Commentary" and 147 examples of concept art (the latter is unlocked once you complete the game). There are some sections of the game rendered far more difficult than they should be due to the lack of a mouse input. I won't spoil any surprises here, but one or two sections require quick reactions to events, and at this point you can suddenly find your cursor is on completely the wrong area of the screen. The very end of the game is more challenging than it should be, due to this.

    Additionally, the save/load system is extremely cumbersome on PS4. The Save menu takes around 15 seconds to load before you see the available save slots and then another 22 seconds to save your game. The Load menu takes about 18 seconds to load and then another 5 seconds to load an actual save point. There are some points in the game where you will want to be saving regularly, so this becomes painful to use.

    As such, and given the extremely short play time (about an hour once you already know the solutions to the puzzles) and lack of replay value, it's hard to recommend this to anyone other than the most hardcore LucasArts fans.
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