For 85 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Anita Gates' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 90 Pulse
Lowest review score: 20 Brush with Danger
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 39 out of 85
  2. Negative: 8 out of 85
85 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    It will probably please fans of this simple genre with its solid suspense, murky lighting and “gotcha!” scares.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    It’s a quietly compelling story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    In between the rampant four-letter words and the occasional partial nudity are likable attempts at humor — some sweet, some saucy.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    [A] thorough, powerfully straightforward documentary.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Anita Gates
    There is little new insight, although the film does create an instructive tension between admiring bravery and sacrifice and being appalled by war itself.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Anita Gates
    The film is exaggerated, ludicrous and simplistic. It shows a towering disdain for both men and women. But Angie and Marco have a certain good-natured charm, and there are some nice shots of Shanghai.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Anita Gates
    The concert itself was a bold, life-affirming project, but with a couple of additional extended music sequences, Mr. Xido’s film might have been more powerful and way more hardcore.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Anita Gates
    This quiet romantic drama never soars but keeps its sense of humor and its balance while taking its subject matter for granted in the best possible way.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    Articulate and sympathetic experts, a calmly authoritative narrator (Alfre Woodard), powerfully conversational subtitles and breathtaking scenery enliven the film’s message.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    A Requiem for Syrian Refugees is as powerfully direct as it is unfortunately heavy-handed, with lingering black-and-white close-ups of barbed wire and children’s wide eyes. But the film is eloquent, too, thanks to the voices of the refugees themselves.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    The film’s storytelling is straightforward, almost standard-issue, but the story itself is compelling, as is the testimony of devotees.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Anita Gates
    With enough tragic-restorative plot twists for a 12-hour mini-series, Botso is an enchanting film for two reasons: Mr. Korisheli’s humanity is magnetic, and no more beautiful case could be made for the psychological healing power of making music.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Anita Gates
    The film’s writer and director, Ivan Kavanagh, and his team pull off a few enjoyable, decently creepy scares, but over all, the action is too cryptic, and the pedestrian dialogue doesn’t help.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    Joanna Lipper’s documentary shapes one country’s recent history into an accessible and tragic family drama.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    Advanced Style is undeniably captivating, even uplifting at times. But Mr. Cohen and Lina Plioplyte, the director, present a disconcerting mixed message.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 20 Anita Gates
    Although the characters repeatedly express their worship of “original art” in gilded frames, the script consists of singularly unoriginal dialogue.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Anita Gates
    The film means well but feels generic, strained and claustrophobic (despite several scenes at a deserted beach), with tight close-ups and sudden confrontations.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    The two leads are so low-key that they almost disappear at times, but The Quitter is a textured, heartfelt drama that achieves its modest goals.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    In Peter Sanders’s sassy documentary Altina... there’s plenty of interesting ground to cover.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Anita Gates
    Having a mild-mannered writer tell this story by sitting in a chair in front of some pretty art in a house museum and just talking seems lackadaisical, but Mr. Moss’s message is clear, shrewdly edited and peculiarly interesting.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Anita Gates
    Thomas Carter, the director, whips us into a frenzy during the big winning-again-is-everything game, as all sports underdog movies must. But in the end, the only real impact is limited to a few scenes.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Anita Gates
    Things turn loud and desperate and stay that way.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Anita Gates
    There is no gore here, and no on-screen violence, but this is in every way a horror movie. With a devastating ending.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Anita Gates
    The script, by Mr. Greer and Helene Kvale, rolls along with lifeless, profoundly unimaginative dialogue.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    If the film is workmanlike at times, it is also elegantly cleareyed.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 40 Anita Gates
    The cast does a fine collective job, and Mr. Brill’s script flirts with clever charm here and there. But the whole film is a missed opportunity because the situations repeatedly defy credibility, and the humor never says anything remotely fresh about human nature or the world we live in.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    In some ways, this is just another underdogs-go-for-it sports movie. In others, it is as sensitive and observant as an Edith Wharton novel.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Anita Gates
    The message is repeated ad infinitum; this documentary is painfully long for a project of this kind.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Anita Gates
    At first, there is something a little too straightforward about the characters and their dialogue. But gradually, a group of strong, sure performances and the script’s twists... take hold, and we are fully involved.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Anita Gates
    Beatocello’s Umbrella could have been a terrible movie. In theory and largely in execution, it is little more than a promotional video for Kantha Bopha, a group of hospitals in Cambodia, and Dr. Richner, who has run them since the early 1990s. But what a guy!

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