For 43 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 95% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 5% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Clark Collis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 83 The Poseidon Adventure
Lowest review score: 42 Underworld: Blood Wars
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 31 out of 43
  2. Negative: 0 out of 43
43 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Clark Collis
    The Australian setting brings a fresh, and epic, quality to this now done-to-death genre, and the directors introduce a few nice new kinks to the zombie mythology, notably a desire on the part of the undead to literally — and hauntingly — bury their heads in the sand. But the real treat is Freeman.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Clark Collis
    Hale and Posey are likable leads and director Jeff Wadlow (Kick-Ass 2) injects proceedings with a propulsiveness which allows you to mostly ignore the odd plot strand which doesn’t really pay off or the general air of preposterousness.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Clark Collis
    Finding Your Feet leans heavily on its cast of British screen greats. Luckily, Staunton, Imrie, Spall, Lumley et al are up to the task of dancing around most of the plot’s more tired or ill-considered moments.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Clark Collis
    Two films in, The Strangers has already become a horribly familiar franchise.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Clark Collis
    Happy Death Day is directed with vim, vigor, and heart by Christopher Landon (Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse), and boasts a winning central performance from Rothe.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Clark Collis
    Peckover’s sharp directing keeps things nicely nasty without ever going too far over the top — though it’s possible some gore-averse Scrooges may disagree. If you want to gift yourself a holiday film that decks the halls with blood, this is one to put under the tree.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Clark Collis
    The film’s real treat is its deep acting bench with franchise veterans Scott, Pill, Liev Schreiber, Kim Coates, and Marc-André Grondin joined by Elisha Cuthbert, TJ Miller, and, of course, Russell, a real-life former hockey pro whose troubled villain is worthy of a redemptive spin-off film.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Clark Collis
    The climax makes for a satisfying conclusion to the franchise—an ending which this writer expects, and even hopes, all concerned will studiously ignore when they get around to making the next one.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 42 Clark Collis
    While the film may justify its title in terms of the viscera on display, it is badly in need of a funny bone.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Clark Collis
    Like "The Strangers," the result is a simple but skillfully told shocker.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Clark Collis
    Under the Shadow is a skilled, chilling feature debut that might follow you around a while after seeing it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Clark Collis
    The result is first-class throughout.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Clark Collis
    Despite its epic length, The Wailing never bores as Na slathers his tale with generous supplies of atmosphere and awfulness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Clark Collis
    Flanagan’s taut direction reinforces his rep as an up-and-comer we will hopefully be hearing much more from.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Clark Collis
    The result should appeal to Austen aficionados and horror hounds alike—which is not a sentence you get to write too often.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Clark Collis
    The niftily claustrophobic use of actual Jerusalem locations offers a nice holiday from the more familiar backdrops favored by the POV genre.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 58 Clark Collis
    The frankly preposterous nature of the film’s setup is rendered slightly less so by a couple of second act reveals. But, by then, many viewers will have lost interest in a movie with a very high bodycount but a very small amount of grit, either emotional or literal.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Clark Collis
    This is the first Shyamalan movie in a long time that viewers may be tempted to re-visit just to see how he pulls off his magic trick.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Clark Collis
    In short, this Josh Trank-directed reboot had a very low hurdle to overcome to become the best FF movie so far. The most fantastical aspect of the movie is that it may not achieve that goal.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Clark Collis
    The only really frightening thing about the 2015 version of Poltergeist is how haunted it is by the original.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Clark Collis
    Though not particularly ground-breaking — last year’s Elijah Wood-starring Open Windows pulled the same trick, and much more ambitiously — we’re still going to “like” the result.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 83 Clark Collis
    Horror fans should keep their eyes on the filmmakers — and Essoe, who gives a star-making performance.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Clark Collis
    While this Blumhouse production may be a less ruthlessly efficient scream machine than, say, its corporate sibling "Ouija," it is much more atmospheric and benefits from a winning central performance from Snook.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 83 Clark Collis
    Tusk lands close to Human Centipede territory in gross-out-ness — a warning, not a complaint — but it also has a genuinely haunting quality as Long's ties to humanity become ever more tenuous.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Clark Collis
    If all this sounds like a souped-up episode of "The Twilight Zone" or "The X-Files," then you're in the right ballpark — or underground bunker.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Clark Collis
    The wordy end product may be short on demons and murderous droids, yet Coherence is a satisfying and chilling addition to the ever-growing pal-ocalypse subgenre.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Clark Collis
    The first two thirds of Chef crackle with hunger-inducing imagery and laughter-provoking gags.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Clark Collis
    To be fair, Eckhart is physically impressive and Bill Nighy and his raised eyebrow do their best in the role of demon leader Naberius. But I, Frankenstein shares something else with it's monster-hero, something much worse than its patchwork nature: The film is distinctly lacking in the soul department.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 67 Clark Collis
    The first, pre-'quake half hour is such a patience-testing slow burn that director Nicolás López runs the risk of extinguishing the viewer's interest altogether. But when things head (metaphorically) south they do so with an escalating, apocalyptic ferocity which continues until the very last second.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 58 Clark Collis
    Unfortunately, no one involved seems to have bent over backwards to make the movie either original or even all that scary.

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