Clayton Dillard

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For 259 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 25% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 72% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Clayton Dillard's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Nocturama
Lowest review score: 0 Always Woodstock
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 90 out of 259
259 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    Alison McAlpine's documentary lacks urgency beyond its persistent pondering of the sky's eternal mysteries.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Clayton Dillard
    Despite the film's bleak premise, writer-director Radu Jude finds dark humor within the certainty of death.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Clayton Dillard
    The pleasure of Denis Côté's film radiates not so much from its storytelling as it does from the meditative force of its formal construction. Read our review.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    It adheres too rigidly to news-cycle replications of barbaric governmental acts, and without putting them into greater perspective.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    The film is enlivened by an acute grasp of the impossibilities that abused Indonesian women face in a society predicated on their continued physical and emotional subjugation to men.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    The film seems to think that the mere recognition of Gabriel as a narcissist sufficiently complicates the character's sense of entitlement.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    On the Seventh Day brings a certain levity to wrenching matters of daily survival by thoroughly humanizing its characters, thus preventing them from feeling as if they're being written as stand-ins for thematic ideas.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Clayton Dillard
    The film's screenplay is impressive for how crucial plot points emerge as backdrops to the explicit purpose of a scene.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    As two-handers go, the film has a moderately compelling pair of performances at its center, with Claudio Rissi’s take on a fun-loving road warrior providing an amusing, if obvious, counterpoint to Paulina García’s reserved homebody.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    While many documentaries about notable figures feel the unfortunate need to legitimate their subjects with hyperbolic praise from recognizable sources, the film immediately runs the gamut in a manner that would be worthy of a mockumentary were it not completely serious.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    The film tends to literalize its theme of unfulfilled desire by having characters explicitly lament their lost pasts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    The film curiously steers toward surmising Hedy Lamarr's psychological state as it pertained to love and pleasure.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    Writer-director Attila Till is content to indulge a complication-free mix of bloodshed and pathos.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Clayton Dillard
    Agnès Varda and JR's film develops into something approaching a manifesto for the possibility of shared happiness.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    Elvira Lind's film is closer to an advertisement for Bobbi Jene Smith than a film about the contemporary dancer.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    The Future Perfect has the texture of a novella that keeps reworking the same idea in successively intricate ways.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    Inherent to director Theo Anthony's misappropriation of the essay form is a conflicting account of precisely which history his documentary seeks to investigate.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    Whereas the more grounded scenes of Death Note anchor a startlingly bloody fantasy of power run amok, the scenes that fixate on super powers and code-busting seldom manage to rise above the realm of serviceable YA fiction.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    Justin Chon fumbles the take on how his characters' anger fits into the greater landscape of a L.A. during the aftermath of the Rodney King beating.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Clayton Dillard
    Bertrand Bonello constructs a clear-eyed sense of how technology keeps getting closer and closer to replacing human consciousness.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Clayton Dillard
    The film’s rhythmic editing contextualizes Ferguson’s streets for their relevance to a black populace’s want for stability and peace.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    A routinely assembled mélange of provocative material consistently undone by its maker's perplexing need to foist himself into the center of every conversation.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    The divide between meaningful journalism and ethical filmmaking seldom seems as wide as it does in The Wrong Light.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Clayton Dillard
    The House's limp comedic pieces are only sporadically enlivened by a game cast.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    It too quickly opts out of its Scenes from a Marriage-like potential for what amounts to an augmented take on The Straight Story.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    Bertrand Tavernier's exquisite documentary consistently avoids mere hagiography by looking to the films themselves.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Clayton Dillard
    The documentary mistakes its access to quotidian behaviors as evidence of the need for comprehensive educational and financial reform.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Clayton Dillard
    Andrzej Wajda's film is a lean, unwavering look at the effects of artistic idealism in the face of fascist doctrine.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    The film hovers between being a straight-up biopic of Zweig and a diagnosis of neoliberalism's recent ceding to neofascist policy and nationalistic fervor.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Clayton Dillard
    The choice of low-grade, handheld digital images further reduces the film to the clichés of revisionist literary filmmaking.

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