Gregory Ellwood

Select another critic »
For 162 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Gregory Ellwood's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 I Lost My Body
Lowest review score: 25 Wakefield
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 162
162 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    Despite a very frank and welcome illustration of gay sexuality rarely seen in modern media (in this manner at least), Greater Freedom continually teases us with storylines and subject matter by choosing to frame this era through a relationship that it cannot rationalize.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Gambis, who is both a director and a biologist, has crafted a piece of art that captivates as much as it informs.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    It’s a subtle and poignant performance that makes you eager for Richardson to have an even bigger spotlight in he next endeavor.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Despite Davis’ lyrical direction, the obvious gaps in the screenplay provide too many holes for what strives to be a definitive portrait of an exceptional talent.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    The film’s saving graces is not only Ahmed, who, as you’d expect, elevates the material every chance he gets, but his on-screen connection with Chauhan. Somehow, the relatively unknown Canadian actor gives one of the best performances from a young actor in recent memory.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    You can certainly respect Sharpe for taking a big swing in this regard, but he can’t bring the proceedings back to earth when the audience needs some sort of emotional investment. This also ends up hampering Cumberbatch, who is giving one of the most committed performances of his life, but only to find it buried under all of the film’s extracurricular aspects.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    This version of Cyrano feels less fresh or contemporary than it wants to be. Something is missing either in the songs, the staging, or, more likely, the screenplay. That being said, the core story will still be compelling to many as it has for over 120 years.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    The filmmakers are beyond lucky to have the performances from Smith and Ellis, as well as Venus’ own incredible story, to keep you captivated when it matters most.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    The storyline is so predictable, in fact, that despite Lafosse’s skills at crafting a scene the narrative simply leaves you wanting. The actors, on the other hand, carry most of your attention because they simply have to.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Of course, you can also just enjoy Red Rocket for Baker and cinematographer Drew Daniels’ gorgeous twilight landscapes or Rex’s irresistible charismatic performance. Or laugh at Stabler’s exploits (although we admit, the film could genuinely be a bit funnier) or fall under Strawberry’s charm. Or you can see more.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Despite what may initially seem to be a somewhat straightforward contemporary drama, Hamaguchi has crafted a rich, skilfully layered masterwork with flawless performances and a script that is a screenwriter’s holy grail. It sticks in your brain for days and nudges you to take it in again.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    No one would deny Sisto clearly has a vision of what he’d like to accomplish and shows flashes of humor here and there, but the almost overt influences of any number of other filmmakers (Michael Haneke, ‎Yorgos Lanthimos, and Sean Durkin immediately come to mind) have the cumulative effect of making the proceedings feel numbingly familiar.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    What’s strikingly revolutionary in Pleasure is how Thyberg’s gaze provides Bella’s story much-needed context by embracing the mundane aspects of this particular world.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    To say it’s a stellar feat of cinema is something of an understatement.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    It becomes pretty obvious early on that CODA is one of those movies where you know where the story is going pretty much the entire time, but the elements harmonize so beautifully it still sucks you in.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Ewing makes a creative decision in the final act of the picture which simply sucks all the air out of the room.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    What there is, however, is Nasibullina and she makes you root for Velya despite all the character’s faults
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Nine Days is the sort of original cinematic art that, these days, is few and far between.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Despite the efforts of Hopkins and an outstanding ensemble, Zeller can’t divorce his feature directorial debut from its theatrical origins.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    There is barely a manufactured minute in the film. Everything fits together organically and in a narrative film that is much harder to pull off than it sounds.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    At almost two-hours Worth somehow feels almost twice as long. Granted, we understand it’s a cliché to describe a film in such terms, but Colangelo and Borenstein are trying to cover too much ground that is, for lack of a better word, repetitive.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    What you take away from Wendy, however, is that Zeitlin’s talent to soar cinematically remains intact. He can transport you to a fantastical world without the benefit of massive CG effects or a massive set on a gigantic soundstage.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Dominic Cooke’s Ironbark is blessed with fantastic turns from Benedict Cumberbatch, Jessie Buckley and Rachel Brosnahan to up the stakes and make it all feel a bit fresher than it actually is.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Blank knows exactly what narrative territory she’s in and uses the dramatic conflicts at bay to make a number of decidedly funny and oh, so painful points.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Simien’s strengths come to the forefront once again and that’s what makes it so difficult to pinpoint why the final product doesn’t exactly gel together as it should.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    The only aspect of the film that even makes it watchable ends up being Shannon’s portrayal of Westinghouse.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Gregory Ellwood
    Simply put, this is an expertly directed first feature. Clapin’s willingness to be patient as a scene unfolds, to let the hand experience the surreal images from its perspective, to let the quiet captivate the audience is beyond impressive.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    The problem, unfortunately, is that Hope Gap is based on Nicholson’s play “The Retreat from Moscow” and the proceedings never really leaves the theater. Despite the director’s attempts to throw in [a few] drone shots to break up the drama and make the affairs inherently more cinematic, there are few scenes that don’t seem as though they would be more intriguing played out in front of a live audience.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    What elevates Hustlers from an entertaining con job flick to something noteworthy is that the racket isn’t inherent to the story Scafaria wants to tell. Many filmmakers will say their film tackles female empowerment, but few do the legwork to make an integral and authentic part of the story.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    A hodgepodge of a story that only really works when Glaisher and Wren are in the sky. And when they are it’s absolutely gorgeous.

Top Trailers