Jeannette Catsoulis

Select another critic »
For 1,328 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters
Lowest review score: 0 London Fields
Score distribution:
1328 movie reviews
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Lousy with stereotypes and filthy language, the sordid Pimp wraps 21st-century blaxploitation in a lesbian love story as unconvincing as every other relationship on screen.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cheerfully derivative yet doggedly entertaining, Number 37 benefits from Dumisa’s slick execution and impressive acting by her small cast.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The upshot is a gentle, gossamer movie that, like its soundtrack, goes down easy and is almost instantly forgotten.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The tone is unabashedly partial, yet the women are such entertaining company it’s hard to mind.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Anchored by Rosamund Pike’s powerhouse lead performance, this restive, raw movie slowly accumulates the heft to render its flaws irrelevant.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With visuals as kinetic as its language, Joseph Kahn’s Bodied is an outrageously smart, shockingly funny satire of P.C. culture whose words gush so quickly you’ll want to see it twice.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Using real experiences shared by the homeless in story workshops, Omotoso — who was also a creator of the South African television series “A Place Called Home” — directs with empathy and without sentimentality.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 0 Jeannette Catsoulis
    London Fields, directed by Matthew Cullen and adapted from Martin Amis’s 1989 novel, is, quite simply, horrendous — a trashy, tortured misfire from beginning to end.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like a photograph slowly developing before our eyes, Shirkers (which was also the title of the original picture) is both mystery and manhunt, a captivating account of shattered friendship and betrayed trust. The skill of the editing (by Tan and two colleagues), though, is key.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Programmatic and groaningly trite, What They Had, the debut feature from Elizabeth Chomko, would be impossible to swallow without its star-studded cast. Even so, it requires all their considerable skills to stop this soapy family drama from sliding into complete banality.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfolding in real time, this immediately involving story bends and turns in surprising, sometimes horrifying ways. Enriched by Oskar Skriver’s marvelous sound editing, which takes us from a speeding van to a bloodcurdling crime scene with equal authenticity, the movie smoothly blends police procedural with character study.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This isn’t a wisecracking, tongue-in-cheek picture: Green wants us to believe in his Bogeyman, and Curtis is his ace card. Leaving no room for winks or giggles, she makes Laurie’s long-festering terror the glue that holds the movie together.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Fluidly capturing the trajectory of a ruinous obsession, the writer and director, Sara Colangelo, skillfully fudges the line between mentoring and manipulation, and between nurturing talent and appropriating it. Suffusing each scene with an insinuating, prickly tension, she remains ruthlessly committed to her screw-tightening tone, offering the viewer no comforting moral escape hatch.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Reports of excessively punitive training of female gymnasts surface with some regularity, so in that sense Over the Limit is not unexpected. But the Polish director Marta Prus, brilliantly constructing a very particular look at a sport in which the arch of an eyebrow is as important as that of a spine, remains coolly impassive.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Suffused with a sentimentality that Wilde himself would have deplored, The Happy Prince is narratively mushy and meandering. Yet, beneath the prosthetics, there’s genuine pathos in Mr. Everett’s portrayal of a man bitterly aware that his talents are unreliable armor against the perceived sin of his homosexuality.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    While most movies of this type simply peter out, “Instructions” maintains such an unswerving commitment to its dark purpose that its final, gorgeously tenebrous images will leave you wobbly for days.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Trouble makes a whole lot of noise without saying very much. The direction is wooden and the cinematography dull, leaving the solid cast (including Julia Stiles as a daffy clerk and Jim Parrack as her knuckle-dragging boyfriend) to shoulder the weight.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A bit of low-budget Nordic nonsense that only makes you appreciate the visual finesse and rowdy discipline of the History channel’s “Vikings.”
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Turning black-white conflict into a laudably complex wash of gray, Mr. Green (inspired in part by a conversation he had with a police officer about the 2014 death of Eric Garner) favors reason over outrage. The political heat rises but the movie stays cool, its smooth, smart climax in keeping with its levelheaded tone.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite a somewhat soft middle section, Free Solo is an engaging study of a perfect match between passion and personality.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A movie that, for all its operatic allusions and actorly expertise, feels dismayingly passionless.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Don’t Leave Home is a frustratingly befuddled movie that’s nevertheless fascinating.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Lizzie isn’t perfect — the pacing can flag, and the lovely Kim Dickens, as Lizzie’s older sister, barely registers — but Ms. Sevigny’s intelligence and formidable control keep the melodrama grounded. Her empathy for Borden, whose fragile constitution belies a searing will, is palpable, as is the sense of inescapable peril surrounding the two female leads.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    All right, then, let’s rip off the Band-Aid: Destination Wedding is torture. And not just because this would-be romantic comedy is grating, cheap-looking and a mighty drag: it also turns two seasoned, likable actors into characters you’ll want to throttle long before the credits roll.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Wistful but never sentimental, it quietly turns the fortunes of one little store into a comment on the fate of many.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A Whale of a Tale is a rambling blend of complaint, tourism and straw-men arguments. What it’s not is persuasive.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    While you don’t require familiarity with the dozen or so earlier titles to enjoy this one, you do require a sense of humor that’s easily triggered and a gag reflex that isn’t.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Fragile yet resilient, We the Animals has an elemental quality that’s hugely endearing, using air and water and the deep, damp earth to fashion a dreamworld where big changes occur in small, sometimes symbolic ways.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Wrapping a political-corruption yarn in a blanket of bullets and blood, the Filipino director and co-writer, Erik Matti, slides visual and textual jokes into the mayhem in ways both sly and blatant.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Sauvaire’s approach may not be for everyone, but his skill and audacity are invigorating — and, strangely, liberating.

Top Trailers