Jeannette Catsoulis

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For 1,680 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 10 Cloverfield Lane
Lowest review score: 0 The Tiger and the Snow
Score distribution:
1680 movie reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Lou
    Methodically violent and more than a little silly, “Lou” delivers a kick in the head to ageism.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The inescapable impression is of a picture buckling beneath the weight of its subject’s achievements. Yet there are moments when the focus shifts and the movie shrugs off its hagiographic shackles.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Kyle Warren’s screenplay is potent enough to generate several moments of suspense, and Watts, an exceptional actor sidelined too often by poor choices, is not the problem here. That would be the decision to jettison the children’s most creative cruelties — and consequently much of the movie’s tension — and a director, Matt Sobel, who’s determined to steer the audience toward a specific interpretation of events.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    On land and underwater, the verisimilitude of the violence is numbing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Gliding inexorably from squirmy to sinister to full-on shocking, this icy satire of middle-class mores, confidently directed by Christian Tafdrup, is utterly fearless in its mission to unsettle.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Punctuated by Gregory Corandi’s gliding, God’s-eye shots of meringue-colored desert and placid shoreline, Saloum has the extravagance of fable and folklore. The plot is ludicrously jam-packed, but the pace is fleet and the dialogue has wit and a carefree bounce.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like most of LaBute’s work, Out of the Blue is talky, sparsely staged and presented with his signature detachment. The two leads are fine.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Jamie Foxx might have top billing, but right there beside him are the professional contortionists whose eye-popping moves are more commonly seen in Las Vegas showrooms than on movie screens.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Spectacularly uninteresting...this dreary Antipodean curiosity is a yob-filled slog of hard-man posturing, all of it bathed in an oppressive testosterone funk. And I haven’t even mentioned the hairy buttocks.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite a female-empowerment theme and an adversary fairly bristling with fancy weaponry, Prey never builds a head of steam.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    While Resurrection harbors more than one theme — empty-nest anxieties, toxic men and the long tail of their manipulations — the movie feels more like an unhinged test of how far into the loonyverse the audience can be persuaded to venture.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Slow, sweet and subdued, A Love Song, Max Walker-Silverman’s lovely first feature, is about late-life longing and needs that never completely go away.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Blending sensuous imagery with jabs of feminist wit — at one point, a vibrator is weaponized against a male intruder — Colbert sends her heroine on a transformative journey of revenge and renewal.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Familiarity might be the point, but a screenplay this coarse leaves the actors little wiggle room, reducing them to mouthpieces for recycled jokes.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    However thoughtful and well-intentioned, this debut feature is too airless and long-winded to excite.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The running time is too long, and the finale’s screaming too prolonged; but, unlike childbirth, this good-natured movie delivers a dry, funny and utterly painless experience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    In place of gouting gore and surging fright, this enjoyable adaptation of Joe Hill’s 2005 short story has an almost contemplative tone, one that drains its familiar horror tropes — a masked psychopath, communications from beyond the grave — of much of their chill. The movie’s low goose bump count, though, is far from ruinous.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Strange and squelchy and all kinds of sick, Mad God comes at you with nauseating energy, its flood of dystopian images both playful and repulsive.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    At once polished and punky, Poser is about the maturing of a vampiric personality. Like its music, the movie feels exploratory and raw-edged, yet with a persistent pathos that clings to Lennon and isolates her.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Enigmatic and imperfect, but nonetheless absorbing and consistently unsettling, Cordelia offers a haunting visualization of a breaking-apart psyche.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    At its grungy heart, Alessandro Celli’s Mondocane is about the dissolution of a friendship. Yet this cynical, near-future crime thriller, with its Hunger Games morality and Mad Max aesthetic, is too busy glamorizing cruelty to allow its central relationship to resonate.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Skillfully merging menace and sweetness (when Anna begins to speak, her parents’ delight is incredibly touching), The Innocents constructs a superbly eerie moral landscape, one that the children (all of whom are fantastic) must learn to navigate.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With Shepherd, the Welsh writer and director Russell Owen shows us how to accrue a great deal of atmosphere with very little fuss.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Perhaps the most depressing thing about Sophia Banks’s Black Site — a dreary, underwritten thriller — is an ending that suggests a sequel might already be in the works. For the sake of its beleaguered star, Michelle Monaghan, I can only hope not.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 0 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A sequel so dumb that no effort by Willis could reasonably be expected to save it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A sometimes uneasy merger of monster movie and psychological horror — with a dollop of social-media satire — this inventive first feature mines tween confusion (there are nods to both bulimia and menstruation) for grotesque fun.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The durable director Lloyd Kaufman lobs multiple notions at the screen to see what sticks. In a movie held together with this many slimy fluids, pretty much everything does.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Glowing with grandiose pronouncements and uplifting sentiment, Return to Space, a draggy documentary about America’s first manned spaceflight since 2011, could be easily repurposed as promotional material for Elon Musk’s SpaceX.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    You Won’t Be Alone, the ravishing, wildly original first feature from Goran Stolevski, moves so hypnotically between dream and nightmare, horror and fairy tale that, once bound by its spell, you won’t want to be freed.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The killings themselves may remain off-camera, but the movie is still an uncomfortable watch. In Jones’s smoldering performance, we see a man stretched beyond his limits, a rubber band just waiting to snap back.

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