Jeannette Catsoulis

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For 1,343 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Ixcanul
Lowest review score: 0 America the Beautiful
Score distribution:
1343 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie’s emotional potency is undeniable, its slow crescendo of wounded feelings and shimmering photography leaving unexpected imprints on the eyes and heart.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Anna feels more like a device than a person, a collection of eccentric behaviors (her job involves counting molehills) that support an aesthetic of excessive cuteness.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If you like your torture movies tight, twisty and decently executed, then Pledge is for you.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Some squinting will be required to block out the race and class stereotyping, as well as the puddles of sentiment scattered throughout the highly predictable plot. Yet Jon Hartmere’s script has genuinely funny moments and is blessedly short on crassness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Corfield is fine in a role that gives her little opportunity to do more than run and fight, but a woman this empowered removes the question mark from her survival — and the tension from the movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    While Jorgen Johansson’s windswept photography creates a credible sense of isolation (he filmed in part at the Mull of Galloway lighthouse), we sense the ominous rhythms of impending calamity.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    While fragments of past, present and who-knows-what events flash past, Cage, bless him, fully commits to the nuttiness.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Neither remotely credible nor more than minimally entertaining, Stacy Cochran’s New York City romance, Write When You Get Work, presents rich folk as gullible idiots and blue-collar crooks as heroes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    In prioritizing Crowhurst’s psychological frailty over his physical challenges (both conveyed more evocatively in the excellent 2007 documentary “Deep Water”), Firth and his director find something quietly touching, even soulful, in the character’s wretchedness. In this somber tragedy, the real demons are never anywhere but right inside that boat.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This beautifully realized movie casts a sensitive, secretive spell.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Erik Molberg Hansen’s relaxed camera movements and fuzzy-soft compositions are quite beautiful, and the performances — including the superb Trine Dyrholm as the baby’s Danish foster mother — are pitch-perfect. Best of all is the magnetic August, whose open, mobile features can slide from plain to lovely with just a shift in the light and whose embrace of the character is a joy to watch.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Rich in information and dense with quiet outrage, Shraysi Tandon’s debut feature, the investigative documentary Invisible Hands, jumps into the murky and shameful world of child trafficking and forced labor.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    While the movie is rightfully more interested in lauding her bravery than highlighting her sometimes abrasive personality, these small moments help to humanize a portrait that can at times seem more awestruck than enlightening.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With its achingly slow build and understated performances, The Clovehitch Killer strains to surmount its lack of urgency.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cam
    Cam is more successful as an oddly feminist tale of gutsy self-reliance than as a fully developed drama.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Lousy with stereotypes and filthy language, the sordid Pimp wraps 21st-century blaxploitation in a lesbian love story as unconvincing as every other relationship on screen.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cheerfully derivative yet doggedly entertaining, Number 37 benefits from Dumisa’s slick execution and impressive acting by her small cast.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The upshot is a gentle, gossamer movie that, like its soundtrack, goes down easy and is almost instantly forgotten.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The tone is unabashedly partial, yet the women are such entertaining company it’s hard to mind.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Anchored by Rosamund Pike’s powerhouse lead performance, this restive, raw movie slowly accumulates the heft to render its flaws irrelevant.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With visuals as kinetic as its language, Joseph Kahn’s Bodied is an outrageously smart, shockingly funny satire of P.C. culture whose words gush so quickly you’ll want to see it twice.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Using real experiences shared by the homeless in story workshops, Omotoso — who was also a creator of the South African television series “A Place Called Home” — directs with empathy and without sentimentality.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 0 Jeannette Catsoulis
    London Fields, directed by Matthew Cullen and adapted from Martin Amis’s 1989 novel, is, quite simply, horrendous — a trashy, tortured misfire from beginning to end.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like a photograph slowly developing before our eyes, Shirkers (which was also the title of the original picture) is both mystery and manhunt, a captivating account of shattered friendship and betrayed trust. The skill of the editing (by Tan and two colleagues), though, is key.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Programmatic and groaningly trite, What They Had, the debut feature from Elizabeth Chomko, would be impossible to swallow without its star-studded cast. Even so, it requires all their considerable skills to stop this soapy family drama from sliding into complete banality.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfolding in real time, this immediately involving story bends and turns in surprising, sometimes horrifying ways. Enriched by Oskar Skriver’s marvelous sound editing, which takes us from a speeding van to a bloodcurdling crime scene with equal authenticity, the movie smoothly blends police procedural with character study.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This isn’t a wisecracking, tongue-in-cheek picture: Green wants us to believe in his Bogeyman, and Curtis is his ace card. Leaving no room for winks or giggles, she makes Laurie’s long-festering terror the glue that holds the movie together.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Fluidly capturing the trajectory of a ruinous obsession, the writer and director, Sara Colangelo, skillfully fudges the line between mentoring and manipulation, and between nurturing talent and appropriating it. Suffusing each scene with an insinuating, prickly tension, she remains ruthlessly committed to her screw-tightening tone, offering the viewer no comforting moral escape hatch.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Reports of excessively punitive training of female gymnasts surface with some regularity, so in that sense Over the Limit is not unexpected. But the Polish director Marta Prus, brilliantly constructing a very particular look at a sport in which the arch of an eyebrow is as important as that of a spine, remains coolly impassive.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Suffused with a sentimentality that Wilde himself would have deplored, The Happy Prince is narratively mushy and meandering. Yet, beneath the prosthetics, there’s genuine pathos in Mr. Everett’s portrayal of a man bitterly aware that his talents are unreliable armor against the perceived sin of his homosexuality.

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