John Anderson

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For 290 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Get Low
Lowest review score: 0 Bio-Dome
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 32 out of 290
290 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    What Mr. Parker has committed to the screen is a righteously indignant, kinetic and well-acted film — Mr. Parker, as Turner, delivers a fierce, complex performance. At the same time, his film is remarkably conventional. The framing and the camera movements are all very routine, even dated; one would have said it looks like television, before television gained its current lustre.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 10 John Anderson
    Mr. Garman’s showcase has very little to do with anything else, but he’s a pal of Mr. Smith’s and, at the very least, his performance is a filet of wit amid a heaping helping of comedic byproduct.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    A mixed bag of a thriller that exploits two primal fears—of artificial intelligence, and precocious children.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Everything in The Light Between Oceans is deeply felt and dramatically precise, in a way that seems destined to become profoundly personal for each and every viewer.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The upshot is an emotionally satisfying fusion of the mixed up and the magical.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    There’s much amusement to be had in the film. Very little of it stupid.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Jakubowicz has made a muscular, messy and vulgar film based on a life that has been all those things.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The psychology of The Club is warped and gnarled, the thinking of its members less-than-jesuitical.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Few viewers anywhere will be immune to the movie’s charms, or the performances, notably that of Mr. Sigurjonsson, who makes Gummi a slightly mournful, enormously lovable and quixotically heroic figure.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    A dispiritingly vitriolic, only sporadically funny satire of ’50s Hollywood, Hail, Caesar! verifies a suspicion long held here, that the Coen brothers, Joel and Ethan, really hate the movies.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    As a work of nonfiction, it deserves its own nomenclature. "Docu-poem" is too inelegant; "masterpiece" works, although it's been used before.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    As Tiberius, who seems not to have been based on any Tiberius of history, Mr. Brody brings to the film a combination of heroin-chic and Basil Rathbone. Also, an extraordinary level of sadistic cruelty. People are burned alive, crushed like insects, hurled from rooftops. They may not deserve all this. But neither do we.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Mr. LaBute is not a moralizer as much as a lamenter — his people usually bring unhappiness upon themselves. In the gently joyous Dirty Weekend, though, they are capable of finding a flight path to contentment.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    The filmmaking is fluid and electric; the acting, precise; the archetypal storytelling, seamless and brutal. What happens in “La Jaula de Oro” might enrage audiences, and probably for a variety of reasons. But there’s no getting away without it leaving a mark.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Consistently daffy, consistently amusing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    As pure comedy, The D Train is far more cringe-worthy than outright hilarious. But as a study in human nature, it’s beyond provocative — and maybe even instructive.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Hot Pursuit is about two women finding sisterly common ground despite ethnic, religious, philosophical, temperamental and/or phonetic differences. It also seems an inevitable stop on Hollywood’s perpetual recycling drive, which caters to an audience perfectly content with the creaky and familiar.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The visuals are kinetic, the pacing frenetic; the violence, or at least its aftermath, doesn’t just border on the excessive, it makes major incursions. But given the criminal milieu at hand, nothing less would have seemed plausible, or equal to the heightened, sordid sensibility Mr. Johnson creates in the film’s opening moments and maintains right up to an ending that is among the more perverse in recent memory.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    For those more concerned with what “The Avengers” movies do best — outsize spectacle and wry comedy — Age of Ultron has to be declared a victory.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Adult Beginners presents itself less as humor than as a study in Gen-X sociology and psychology. What happens when people raised in relative ease and who expect to live an even better life than their parents are left emotionally unequipped for reality? It might be touching. It might even be important. But it’s not exactly a lot of laughs.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    “Montage” is about expression. As such, it’s a more honest tribute to Mr. Cobain than any conventional documentary could pretend to be.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The problem for Mr. Krieger is that his film has been trying to dazzle us with all manner of sleight of hand and hokum and now undertakes the construction of a conventional romance. The movie starts spinning its wheels.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    A very entertaining black comedy for very mysterious reasons.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Mr. Ostlund positions his troubled characters in an environment of polished ash and Scandinavian spotlessness, under which there are dark mutterings — the constant creak of tow cables and un-oiled metal.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    White Bird in a Blizzard is an alibi for Mr. Araki to flex his considerable muscle as a visual artist, using a palette that ranges from the blissful to the grotesque, and an atmospheric score by those eminences of the ambient, Harold Budd and Robin Guthrie.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    There are not a lot of moments in documentary cinema that equal Citizenfour. Ms. Poitras was already at work on a film about government surveillance when Mr. Snowden presented himself, and she’s something of a lightning rod, too, one with little evident sympathy for Obama administration data mining.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Camp X-Ray isn’t anti-American, despite much of Ali’s rhetoric. It is about the evils of ignorance, wherever it rears its ugly head.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    World War II is often called the “last good war,” which has also meant that it was the last global conflict out of which the studios could make an unabashedly heroic movie. Fury is not that movie. And because it is not, it provides a few psychic disturbances beyond its shocking gore, burning soldiers blowing their brains out, children hanged from trees by the SS and imminent rape.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Naturally, Mr. Murray is a joy to watch. And he has brought so much joy to so many grumpy people he deserves whatever accolades he can accrue, even for a career-assessment comedy like St. Vincent.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    It also happens to feature a pair of performances that eclipse all else around them.

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