For 77 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Josh Kupecki's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 89 Out of the Blue (1980)
Lowest review score: 11 Reality Queen!
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 59 out of 77
  2. Negative: 4 out of 77
77 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Josh Kupecki
    Much like the behavior of Sheriff Ambrose as he investigates the murders occurring around him, the story is best served as something to be glanced at rather than examined too closely. If you stare too long at fool’s gold, it loses its fleeting appeal.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Josh Kupecki
    A sapphic blending of Westerns and mythology (Boorman via Cocteau?) shot through a filter of Seventies sci-fi paperback covers, After Blue is the second proper feature from French experimental filmmaker Bertrand Mandico – although his output of shorts is abundant – following 2017’s The Wild Boys.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Josh Kupecki
    The film offers a familiar structure of family, friends, and experts speaking of O’Brien’s struggle, of the need for more awareness, and of the growing health care crisis that looms in the not too distant future.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Josh Kupecki
    A standard setup for a horror film, but filmmaker Jane Schoenbrun (who, among other projects, was ringleader/executive producer for the equally slippery SXSW 2016 feature collective:unconscious) has not made a horror film, but a fractured portrait of teenage malaise, of deceptions (both of self and others), and of the awkward probing of a cocoon’s inner shell.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Josh Kupecki
    Stearns’ film is less interested in examining the complexities of our duality than it is with displaying our societal follies with an irony and disaffection that is Stearns’ trademark. When Dual’s clone confrontation lands on its O. Henry finale, it’s both inevitable and satisfying, another darkly comic deposition to add to the archive.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Josh Kupecki
    Alice stitches together an intriguing premise, but ends up weaker than the sum of its parts.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Josh Kupecki
    One would think that a film concerning ghosts, time travel, and righting past wrongs would clearly lay out the rules, but Do and screenwriter Christopher Larsen are more interested in pastoral atmosphere than logic and with examining the emotional toll of regret, of mistakes, and how those things can follow you forever.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Josh Kupecki
    It is nothing less than a tapestry detailing the human desire for, yes, money, but more importantly, for connection.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Josh Kupecki
    With a modest budget that belies the eye-popping visuals at play, filmmaking duo Kentucker Audley and Albert Birney have affectionately crafted a sweet romance surrounded by the tart crunch of satire.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Josh Kupecki
    Roth delicately captures the weight of weariness that burdens Neil, as he shuffles the streets in his Birkenstocks, briefly showing signs of life in the company of Berenice. We are locked on to Neil for those signs, and Roth’s performance is utterly absorbing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Josh Kupecki
    Last and Future Men is a haunting film of melancholic beauty, but hidden within are stubbornly persistent elements of hope.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 89 Josh Kupecki
    In sharing his story with the world, Amin and Rasmussen have given us a truly generous gift.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Josh Kupecki
    Jude and Cărbunariu have brought Mugur Călinescu back to life, and woven him into a complex tapestry that reveals a country’s history as a most fragile trompe l’oeil.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Josh Kupecki
    King Car has moxie and its heart is in the right place, even if it feels like dialectic materialism for motorheads.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Josh Kupecki
    Joel Coen’s The Tragedy of Macbeth is an outstanding gem of form and content, and I take solace that future generations of English students now have a new text to learn from.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Josh Kupecki
    Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn is a frustratingly brilliant (and brilliantly frustrating) experience that formally doesn’t really have a contemporary cinematic referent, an eyeball-slicing polemic by a bomb-throwing provocateur.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Josh Kupecki
    The interplay of setback and triumph of the sports film genre, here informed by both racial and socioeconomic concerns, is comfortably familiar, and Green, with writer Zach Baylin, never met a tennis serve/time transition they didn’t run with, but they keep their gaze on Papa Williams and his provocative eccentricities, dutifully lionizing the man as good as any royal biographer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Josh Kupecki
    While India Sweets and Spices adds a veneer of depicting the contemporary Indian American experience, beyond the gorgeous lehengas and saris, past the insert shots of perfectly arrayed cuisine, lies a bland, uninspired story cut from a well worn template.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Josh Kupecki
    Co-fabulists Pablo Larraín and writer Steven Knight have made a film that marries the former’s elliptical, experimental style with the latter’s penchant for alternative histories stuffed with archetypes. But it is Stewart’s performance at the center of it all that is the most startling aspect of Spencer. She brings a theatricality in the way she moves and speaks that transcends impersonation yet falls thankfully shy of camp.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Josh Kupecki
    Shot in black and white with some quirky wipe transitions thrown in (haven’t seen the classic page-turning wipe in a while), El Planeta orbits around an aesthetic and sensibility rooted in Eighties indie films. But mother and daughter have a comfortable chemistry that surpasses the deadpan material.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Josh Kupecki
    An anthology film of five segments, it is an indulgent celebration of that venerable weekly magazine whose collective bylines helped shape the cultural preoccupations of the last century, not to mention informing much of Anderson’s work.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Josh Kupecki
    It’s the lack of tension, overlong running time, and ultimately mawkish message that makes Needle a nonstarter.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Josh Kupecki
    Focusing her camera on the rising cogs in the machine of China’s insatiable consumer culture, Jessica Kingdon expands on her 2017 short “Commodity City” with the visually stunning feature Ascension.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Josh Kupecki
    The phrase “searing indictment” is an overused idiom in the critic’s toolbox, but in this instance, it couldn’t be more appropriate.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Josh Kupecki
    Carnahan and co-conspirators Kurt McLeod and Mark Williams are clearly having a blast orchestrating this symphony of Grand Guignol.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Josh Kupecki
    While some of the re-creations of clandestine meetings and shots of faceless men transporting the painting can be a bit cloak-and-dagger cheesy, that’s the only stumble in a film that tells a strange tale populated by a cast of eccentric and dangerous characters.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Josh Kupecki
    Is there such a thing as too much pathos? Trick question, because there is not. So, should you find yourself a bit emotionally imbalanced these days, and the aggressively optimistic charms of Ted Lasso have proven to be a placebo, come see how the other half lives and seek out The Macaluso Sisters, a beautiful bummer that is the perfect elixir of Aristotelian purgation, and a restorative for your soul.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Josh Kupecki
    As he did with his previous doc, 2018’s John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection, Faraut finds and obsesses over the rhythm of bodies in motion, using repetition and cross-cuts of the team’s training footage and gameplay with anime sequences and textile manufacturing. These collisions, set to music from Portishead and Grandaddy’s Jason Lytle, are the heart of Witches, hypnotic patterns of serene velocity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Josh Kupecki
    Keeping the camera on Fournet and Garland may reduce the screentime of the actual humpbacks, but Xanthopoulos is more interested in the research process, the passion and devotion the two have for their work, and capturing not just the thrills and the agony, but also more contemplative moments of of reflection and motivation.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Josh Kupecki
    The film, anchored by interviews with Moreno and her co-stars and contemporaries, positions Moreno as a trailblazer, a barrier-breaker, and a role model, but more interestingly, it ultimately tracks a journey of self discovery.

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